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View Full Version : All this for a whopping 10 cents?


FuzzyKitten99
03-12-2008, 07:05 PM
Last night, about 10 minutes to closing, I had a woman come through and buy a bunch of school supplies. Anyway, I finish ringing up, and I give her the receipt. She leaves.

She comes back, and says that there is a possible price discrepancy on a pack of markers.

I look, and it says the markers were rung up as $2.99. She insisted they were marked $2.89 on the shelf. So, I go over and look, and sure enough, the price tag hadn't been changed yet, and it read $2.89. Usually they get changed on Sundays, if any need to be done, and the tags that need to be changed for price automatically print out on our printer. Corporate does this for us. Looks like the markers were missed.

She wants her money back. We will price over-ride if a sign was up that advertised a lower price, but maybe forgotten to be taken down.

So, I can get her money back to her account. However, the only way I can do this, is to return the markers and repurchase them and manually override the price difference, and the whole 10 cents will be put back on her account. I also need the actual marker pack to scan as a return. If I don't scan it, the system won't allow the return.

Well, she left the bag in the car, and thought it was a HUGE problem to go out and get it again. I told her there was nothing I could do without the marker pack. So she huffed off and got them. I went ahead and did the whole procedure, all the while we had other customers waiting behind her and mine is the only register open. When it gets to 15-20 minutes to closing, the MOD will pull all but one front drawer.

So I went through all the trouble, spending almost 10 minutes just on her, to refund her a whopping 10 cents.

Peppergirl
03-12-2008, 07:25 PM
God. Would you have been allowed to just give her the damned dime, and then slipit back into the till out of your purse so that you balanced? I think that's what I would have done.

Hell, even as a customer I've been known to dig in my purse for a quarter and offering it to an SC who is holding up the line for some miniscule amount. :lol:

cravenmorhead
03-12-2008, 07:44 PM
She did have a valid claim here.

In Canada, there is a voluntary procedure that many major retailers adher to, the Code of Practice Scanner Price Accuracy. What it basically says is:

If the scanned price of an non-price ticketed item is higher than the shelf price or any other displayed price, the customer is entitled to receive the item free, up to a $10 maximum. When the item has a price tagged, the lowest price applies. When identical items are incorrectly priced, the second one will be sold at the correct price. Under this code you are eligible.

She could have gotten, and anyone else who was paying attention, those markers for free. It doesn't look like this establishment has implemented those codes though. It also doesn't excuse her behaviour by any stretch of the imagination.

Anakah
03-12-2008, 08:19 PM
If the scanned price of an non-price ticketed item is higher than the shelf price or any other displayed price, the customer is entitled to receive the item free, up to a $10 maximum. When the item has a price tagged, the lowest price applies. When identical items are incorrectly priced, the second one will be sold at the correct price. Under this code you are eligible.
.

Was this in Canada?

I think that is really stupid. Why should they be entitled to something for free because of human error??? Yes, they would get the item for whatever price they saw it for but it why free?
I'm not trying to be mean to anybody but it just seems like the biggest bend over backwards and take it up the A$$ thing I've ever heard of. I understand there is a maximum of ten dollars but thats still something the store should not be loosing. Sometimes there just isn't time to change all the prices.

But anyway to the poster, yeah ten cents big deal! I'd understand if it were like five dollars and up but ten cents is pretty sad.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
03-12-2008, 08:43 PM
Was this in Canada?

I think that is really stupid. Why should they be entitled to something for free because of human error??? Yes, they would get the item for whatever price they saw it for but it why free?
.

My guess is to encourage the stores to make sure their items are signed with the correct prices every time.

I don't believe we have the same code here in Cheeseland, but we do have state pricing auditors who visit the store from time to time and can issue us penalties of some sort if we keep having items ring up at the wrong price. Plus local TV news departments who love to run exposes on stores whose prices are rigniong up wrong at the registers.

cravenmorhead
03-12-2008, 08:45 PM
Was this in Canada?
Aye.


I think that is really stupid. Why should they be entitled to something for free because of human error??? Yes, they would get the item for whatever price they saw it for but it why free?
I'm not trying to be mean to anybody but it just seems like the biggest bend over backwards and take it up the A$$ thing I've ever heard of. I understand there is a maximum of ten dollars but thats still something the store should not be loosing. Sometimes there just isn't time to change all the prices.


It closes the door for legitimate false advertising lawsuits. In this case that would be a completely valid reason to take that company to court. That being said any judge/lawyer would laugh in your face and tell you to go home and quit wasting your time. The purpose of it, based on the Retail Council of Canada (http://www.retailcouncil.org/advocacy/cp/issues/scanner_acc/print/scanner_accuracy02_eng.asp) website concerning this code is:

1. Visibly demonstrate retailer commitment to scanner price accuracy;
2. Provide retailers with a consistent national framework for dealing with scanner price accuracy issues; and
3. Provide the retail industry with a mechanism for consumer redress in scanner price accuracy cases, to be managed by the industry through an industry committee.

It is completely voluntary. Though in some places, such as wal-shart, getting such a value is like pulling teeth.

FuzzyKitten99
03-12-2008, 08:49 PM
God. Would you have been allowed to just give her the damned dime, and then slipit back into the till out of your purse so that you balanced? I think that's what I would have done.

Hell, even as a customer I've been known to dig in my purse for a quarter and offering it to an SC who is holding up the line for some miniscule amount. :lol:

If I had a dime in my pocket, I would have. But I rarely carry cash, so it is even rarer to have any change on me.

IvorTangrean
03-12-2008, 08:53 PM
When I worked at WM the customer had to ask to get the $10 off. The funny thing was that each till had a sign for it right next to the cashier. I know I was never asked to do it.

Tito
03-12-2008, 10:15 PM
I think that I was caught behind that lady once in line. She was giving the cashier a hard time over a 10 cent coupon. It was very tempting to reach into my pocket, pull out a dime, and tell her 'here's your damn dime, now beat it!'

marasbaras
03-13-2008, 12:42 AM
I would've been tempted to pull a dime from the till, give it to her, then make it up later when I was closing out the till .. nearly closing, people waiting ... geez.

Stupid SC. It's a DIME. Not even worth your time coming back from the car.

Andara Bledin
03-13-2008, 01:16 AM
I know that one of the grocery stores I used to frequent had a policy that if you found a price discrepancy on your receipt and took it to the customer service desk, they'd give you that item (or up to $10) back. They did it as a service to reward customers for catching their mistakes, and so they could get them fixed in a timely manner.

But, still. I wouldn't have even bothered to walk back into the store for $0.10. My time is worth more than that.

^-.-^

Listerfiend
03-13-2008, 02:14 AM
I'd be tempted to give her the dime out-of-pocket, but would probably do the return and re-purchase to waste her time and make her wait (I know it wouldn't teach her a lesson or anything, but I would enjoy pissing her off).

mattm04
03-13-2008, 02:43 AM
MY store has a policy along the lines of if the price rings up wrong you get 1 free and the rest at the advertised price. I am happy as long as I get it at the correct price. I realize mistakes happen and NOBODY even SC's and store/corp managers are perfect.

evilhomer
03-13-2008, 02:56 AM
If I catch that kind of thing as it's being rung up, I'll say something but there's no way I'm going back to the store, even from the parking lot for such a small amount.

I'm glad you went through the whole song and dance rather than giving in to temptation and giving her $0.12 (Canada, you have to add the tax :D ). It may have been annoying to all affected, but maybe she'll clue in to how much earning that whopping sum cost her in time spent.

fish3k1
03-13-2008, 11:36 AM
She did have a valid claim here.

In Canada, there is a voluntary procedure that many major retailers adher to, the Code of Practice Scanner Price Accuracy. What it basically says is:

If the scanned price of an non-price ticketed item is higher than the shelf price or any other displayed price, the customer is entitled to receive the item free, up to a $10 maximum. When the item has a price tagged, the lowest price applies. When identical items are incorrectly priced, the second one will be sold at the correct price. Under this code you are eligible.

She could have gotten, and anyone else who was paying attention, those markers for free. It doesn't look like this establishment has implemented those codes though. It also doesn't excuse her behaviour by any stretch of the imagination.

I don't know too much about small-cost items, but I know over in the UK we have a system whereby if an item is incorrectly priced, the store is NOT required to honour the misprice, so long as they correct the displayed price within 24 hours of being made aware of the issue.

This has actually come up in my job, where something (like for example, a 200 mountain bike) was on half-price one week and back to full-price the next, and one or two of the sale-price self-service tickets have managed to go unnoticed (or more likely, the customer took it home with them the week before _). We get people demanding we sell the item at sale price, insisting that we're obliged to do so.

Nakajo
03-13-2008, 07:08 PM
We have stickers on most our media items, so with that Canadian "mislabeled" rule, I feel it could open a huge doorway to theft and fraud by those lines. People would be switching tags all day to get free stuff.

Had an moron come up with a huge $300 DVD box set (full series of something) that they had obviously "re"labeled at $60. SC threw a fit when the manager said they couldn't have it at that price. When the manager mentioned that we caught them on tape switching the tags, they ran out of there. Hilarious.
The cashier that caught the relabel got EOTM. :)

Andara Bledin
03-13-2008, 10:11 PM
In practically every law regarding pricing accuracy, any time a price is obviously a mistake, such as a $300 boxed DVD set for $60 (yeah, nice try, pal), that it's not a valid cause for a complaint.

It's only when the price could be reasonably expected for the item.

^-.-^

earl colby pottinger
03-14-2008, 03:10 AM
However, there is no protection for stores when no-one at the store understands what they are selling.

I missed out by just one day, but years ago the local WalMart mis-priced a solar panel/battery combo that should have been priced $199.99 (that was the introductory price, probably another reason no-one realize something was wrong.)

They priced it on the floor and on the cashier terminals as $19.99 each. I would have bought two if I had known. They sold at-least five before they ran out/caught the error.

cravenmorhead
03-17-2008, 10:29 PM
However, there is no protection for stores when no-one at the store understands what they are selling.

I missed out by just one day, but years ago the local WalMart mis-priced a solar panel/battery combo that should have been priced $199.99 (that was the introductory price, probably another reason no-one realize something was wrong.)

They priced it on the floor and on the cashier terminals as $19.99 each. I would have bought two if I had known. They sold at-least five before they ran out/caught the error.

That is how I got to england, and then turkey a few years back. They had a package to get to london for $1150 per person, but the advertised price was $115. It almost cost us more to get to Turkey, then it did to get to London. This is from Western Canada (Calgary).

Lace Neil Singer
03-18-2008, 01:24 PM
I once got a brand new hardback book for 1 cuz it was incorrectly priced; it should have been 10. I would have bought the book anyway, I just thought I'd try my luck. So at the till, I asked politely if I could have the book for a pound, as it was priced for a pound... and they let me have it! XD

As regards to the OP, you think that's bad? I once had a customer who practically blew a bloodvessel cuz he'd been overcharged by, get this, 1p. Yeah, that's right, one lousy penny. His paper had rung up at 25p, not 24, so he returned to bitch and whine about it. Normally the procedure is to send these people to Customer Services, but I didn't want to subject the nice people there to this idiot, so I gave him a penny out of the till just to get rid of him. A penny wouldn't show up as being over by any stretch of the imagination; in any case, I heard nothing about it.

Beckpatton
04-25-2008, 04:48 PM
Some stores here in Australia have that policy also, if an item scans above the shelf price they get the first one free, and the rest at the lower price. It's not a law or anything, and it's not regulated as far as I know, but it is a policy that some stores do implement.

Many years ago I worked at a hardware store that did not have this particular policy and I spent many many minutes explaining to a SC that this is not law, that it is a policy some stores carry, (mostly supermarkets). My store did not have that policy, so he would only be getting the goods at the lower price. He was such a smug prick I just wanted to beat him over the head with a hammer, (I did say it was a hardware store right) He kept saying, "I think you'll find it is in fact the law, and you are now breaching that law and I should get the goods for free" I kept saying "I'm sorry sir, but it is not law it is a policy some stores have, we however do not have that policy. Feel free to contact consumer affairs, but I am sure you will find that you are actually wrong! Now... Do you want the goods or not?"

I am sorry, but just because I was on the serving side of the register does not mean I am an idiot! You SC are the one being a fool, I however am a CS legend and your pissy attittude does not phase me in the slightest! BUH-BYE!

Apathy
04-25-2008, 05:44 PM
At my store, the pricing team was wildly understaffed, so there were tons of wrong prices out on the shelves. I can't imagine how much the store would lose if they gave those things away for free.

Mark Healey
04-25-2008, 07:41 PM
So I went through all the trouble, spending almost 10 minutes just on her, to refund her a whopping 10 cents.

This is one of those situations where it is good that someone decided to be the Designated Dick.

Yes, it'sa trivial amount.
Yes, it's annoying to be the person behind them.

But you have to keep in mind that whenever journalists check on scanning discrepencies they always net in the stores favor. This is because they are really careful about making sure things don't scan for below the price but rather sloppy the other way. With a big chain a few exxtra cents off a small percentage of purchases can mean millions in extra profit.

If they get away with it on some old ladies Ensure, they will be tempted to do it on my Coke Zero.

greensinestro
04-25-2008, 09:21 PM
Was this in Canada?

I think that is really stupid. Why should they be entitled to something for free because of human error??? Yes, they would get the item for whatever price they saw it for but it why free?
.

You really ought to visit South Florida some time. I mean no disrespect toward any nationality or race, but many northerners who spend the winter months down here often pull this all the time at stores. It's a whopping ten cents and to us normal people, this would not be a big deal. I myself would have said "Screw it" and left. Yet, these snowbirds that we have will always find a way to get a free item under a policy like this. It's probably not implemented down here due to the problems it would cause places of business. It's bad enough we already have that crap going on at restaurants and other places of business.

depechemodefan
04-25-2008, 09:47 PM
I was at a store (known as Hell-mart) when I bought some vitimins. The tag stated $3.49. At the check-out counter I'm charged $5.12. I leave the store and while I'm looking at the receit I see the overcharge. So I go back in the store, without the bottle and double check the barcode (the receipt has the barcode number on it) on the tag and it's the same number. I go back outside to get the bottle (I did't want to bother to get the greeter to put a return sticker on it if I was wrong) and the greeter is doing something I haven't seen before. I guess someone's merchandise went off, so the greeter was writting on a form the serial number or something from the box and other info., but wasn't keeping the item. Anyway, that took a while and finally I got my return sticker.

I Go to Customer Service, went with the woman to the shelf, she double checked the barcode and we went back to CS. Now I paid with a cc but she gave me cash back, which is cool.

Lot of times, though, the tag says one thing and the receipt another thing. I hate that. I know it's a big store but the prices never ring up lower than the tag*.

In fact, one day I bought these barrettes. Now there were more than 10 on the hook. The price rang up differently. I go back and see the barcode on the tag was different from the one on the package. I should have gotten a refund but I didn't. I could see one barrette package on a wrong hook because someone picked it up and put it in the wrong place, but it looked like whoever restocked just stuck all her/his stock of those barrettes in the wrong place.

*I did one day buy something with a red clearance tag on it. Normal price $24, clearance was $15. It was a bedspread that came in a clear plastic pouch. The barcode was inside the pouch, on cardboard (which has a picture of the bedspread) that wraps around the bedspread. The clearance tag is on the outside. The cahier scans the barcode on the inside of the pouch and it rings $12. She is surprised and she said she had to check with the supervisor. Ugh, all this not to give it too me for $12. Even though the barcode scanned wasn't something that was removeable.

jb17kx
04-25-2008, 09:57 PM
Some stores here in Australia have that policy also, if an item scans above the shelf price they get the first one free, and the rest at the lower price. It's not a law or anything, and it's not regulated as far as I know, but it is a policy that some stores do implement.

That's mostly correct - the Code of Practice for Computerised Checkout Systems in Supermarkets is a voluntary guideline administered by the Australian Retailer's Association.