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AnaKhouri
07-25-2013, 11:57 PM
No, really. Tell me something I don't know.

I'll start.

David Bowie, from a distance, appears to be heterochromatic (have eyes of different colors). But he really doesn't; both eyes are blue. As a kid he was injured in a fight and one pupil is permanently dilated, giving the impression that the injured eye is darker.


OK CS'ers, give me more useless knowledge! What is your favorite random fact?

Jay 2K Winger
07-26-2013, 12:24 AM
The plastic tips at the end of shoelaces are called 'aglets'. Their true purpose is sinister.

morgana
07-26-2013, 12:36 AM
Johnny Depp, in addition to starting his show-business career as a guitarist, is a very talented watercolorist.

Jay 2K Winger
07-26-2013, 12:39 AM
Benicio Del Toro wears a ring with a wooden stone in it, so that when he needs to "knock on wood," he can do so easily.

jedimaster91
07-26-2013, 12:41 AM
The plastic tips at the end of shoelaces are called 'aglets'. Their true purpose is sinister.

Justice League quote for the win!

MoonCat
07-26-2013, 12:43 AM
Dave Thomas, the father of David Boreanaz, once hosted a children's TV show in Buffalo called Rocketship 7.

Bright_Star
07-26-2013, 12:43 AM
"Rocky" won an academy award for best picture of 1976.

Jay 2K Winger
07-26-2013, 01:33 AM
Max Brooks, the author of The Zombie Survival Guide and World War Z, is the son of Mel Brooks.

AnaKhouri
07-26-2013, 01:44 AM
A group of owls is called a paliament. They are also called wisdoms or studies. Crows come in murders, and a group of ravens is called an unkindness. Which seems...unkind.

firecat88
07-26-2013, 02:28 AM
Ireland has the highest rate of people born with Spina Bifida in the world. North Carolina has the second highest.

Tama
07-26-2013, 02:38 AM
Christopher Lloyd refrained from blinking while on camera as Judge Doom in Who Framed Roger Rabbit in order to, per the Wiki article, "perfectly portray" the character.

violiavampyr
07-26-2013, 02:42 AM
Dalmatians are completely white at birth. Their spots don't come in for another few weeks.

Sunshine
07-26-2013, 03:15 AM
My grandmother taught george w in elementary school. Had to paddle him for misbehavior too. It didnt take apparently....lol

fireheart
07-26-2013, 06:17 AM
A group of owls is called a paliament. They are also called wisdoms or studies. Crows come in murders, and a group of ravens is called an unkindness. Which seems...unkind.

A group of rhinos is called a crash. :D

Also for completely random facts, Australia is home to one of the deadliest spiders in the world, but there haven't been any fatalities recorded for just over 30 years now. :)

sms001
07-26-2013, 09:36 AM
Spock shoots porn. :eek:



(Actually, Leonard Nimoy is a great photographer, some of which are nudes. And he's rather good.)

hinakiba777
07-26-2013, 10:26 AM
The dot on the letter i and j is called a tittle.

Benicio Del Toro wears a ring with a wooden stone in it, so that when he needs to "knock on wood," he can do so easily.
The Purpose of "knocking on wood" is to awaken Wood Sprites to grant you wish. When Christian's adopted the practice it was said to be the same as knocking on the true cross, which makes no sense really.

A group of owls is called a paliament. They are also called wisdoms or studies. Crows come in murders, and a group of ravens is called an unkindness. Which seems...unkind.

A group of Ferrets is called a business. A group of unicorns is called a blessing. A group of zombies is called a shambling. A group of God is called a Himself. (That being the Judeo-Christian God, not gods as in a pantheon. That always made me giggle. I used to have a graphic with the group names for all animal groups both Mystical, mythical, and real)

EricKei
07-26-2013, 11:56 AM
Before he started doing movies, Elvis spent some time performing at the (long-since closed) Pontchartrain Beach amusement park in New Orleans.
The Purpose of "knocking on wood" is to awaken Wood Sprites to grant you wish. When Christian's adopted the practice it was said to be the same as knocking on the true cross, which makes no sense really.
Another (supposed) Christian interpretation is that worms which may be living in the wood are spies for that mean red dude who lives down below, and convey poorly-chosen words to him that people have said (read: their JOB is to give the evil GM ideas) if they say something that is just "begging for trouble" -- knocking startles and confuses the little buggers, so they forget whatever it was that you said.

fireheart
07-26-2013, 01:43 PM
In the South Park film, this scene occurs: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IiNYmiM0Nfw (definitely nsfw!!) originally that scene was going to involve cartmans mum engaging in certain acts with animals. :D

Funnily enough, keeping in with the theme of ass-related jokes in the film, the piano that is played during big gay als song later in the film is labelled "felcher and sons." :lol:

CoffeeMonkey
07-26-2013, 02:01 PM
Natural bread starters are mixtures of flour and water that have colonies of yeasts that were started with fruit skins and gathered from the air. Wild yeasts float all around us, especially in watery areas. A starter is basically immortal, as long as it's fed and its environment is maintained. san Francisco sourdough starter has been alive for 150 years.

Starters (or preferments) encourage gluten strength, assist in rising and extend shelf life. Along with the yeasts, different kinds of good bacteria grow, and the acids they produce give bread complex flavor. they are what makes sourdough sour.

There are lots of different kinds of preferments. You can make levain (a natural starter) by soaking raisins in water for a couple of days, and then over a week or so feeding it doses of flour and water. Once the levain has grown, you can start using it, and keep it in your fridge to slow it down. Only problem for the home baker is that you have to feed it every couple of days in the fridge or the yeast will run out of food and die. If you don't bake a lot, this can lead to a bread monster that will take over a small town. To make starter for just one loaf that is super easy, try poolish. Mix eight ounces (by weight) of flour and water with half the yeast from your recipe. Cover and let it hang out in a warm place overnight. Then just add the rest of your ingredients and mix as normal.

Kal
07-26-2013, 05:55 PM
A group of baboons is called a "flange". This was made up for a comedy show called "Not the Nine O'Clock News", somehow made its way into a scientific usage, and is now the official term for it.

Antisocial_Worker
07-26-2013, 11:12 PM
Christina Hendricks, of Mad Men fame, in addition to possessing perhaps the finest natural bosom in Hollywood, can also play the accordion. She is a natural blonde, but began dyeing her hair red after reading Anne of Green Gables as a child... and speaking of, she's from Knoxville, Tennessee.

Aislin
07-27-2013, 12:21 AM
Hippo milk is naturally pink.

firecat88
07-27-2013, 01:03 AM
A tie-in novel was written for the game The 7th Guest. It goes into better detail about the lives of Stauf and the guests.

(Picture by me. :D Because I just got a copy of it today.)

sms001
07-27-2013, 01:31 AM
Christina Hendricks, of Mad Men fame,

And Firefly!

paintballworker
07-27-2013, 02:22 AM
In the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster, a new mineral was discovered. Chernoblyite was found in the corium lava(the glassy material formed after a meltdown), and is highly radioactive(up to 10% of it's content is uranium).

Chernobyl is also one of two Level 7 INES(International Nuclear Event Scale) disaster - the other being Fukushima Daiichi.

Three Mile Island, the other (in)famous* nuclear accident, rates a 5 on the scale.

This has been a service of the PBW School of Nuclear Trivia.

*any discussion on my use of these words should be left to fratching or a pm.

SongsOfDragons
07-27-2013, 10:17 AM
Urk. You try to think of useless factoids and they all swim out of your head. XP

Benicio Del Toro wears a ring with a wooden stone in it, so that when he needs to "knock on wood," he can do so easily.

I just tap myself on the head...my surname is Wood. :D

In the aftermath of the Chernobyl disaster, a new mineral was discovered. Chernoblyite was found in the corium lava(the glassy material formed after a meltdown), and is highly radioactive(up to 10% of it's content is uranium).


I have a morbid fascination with radioactive stuff. I remember reading about the 'Elephant's Foot', corium from the Chernobyl meltdown that ended up several stories below the reactor in a massive two-tonne lump that was so radioactive it borked the camera-on-wheels they had to send in to look at it, let alone getting a man in close proximity. I recently saw this photo (http://nuclearvault.tumblr.com/post/53895102913/the-elephants-foot-chernobyl-the-grainy-effect)... and went :eek::eek::eek: what are you doing there man?!

AnaKhouri
07-27-2013, 12:14 PM
I read a book of interviews with Chernobyl survivors. Prolonged radiation sickness has to be the absolute worst way to die.

On a lighter note, Barbie's (the doll's) full name is Barbara Millicent Roberts.

fireheart
07-27-2013, 01:29 PM
On a lighter note, Barbie's (the doll's) full name is Barbara Millicent Roberts.

Fun fact: in Iran/Saudi Arabia, they've banned the sale of Barbie (no surprises there) because of her indecent clothing and lifestyles. (to them. I can understand this to a point since they seem to have focused on more fashion-conscious Barbie and less "good role model" Barbie)

Instead, they've promoted the sale of Fulla dolls, which are also sold in a number of other countries. She's designed to be a role model to Muslim girls. Therefore, all the clothing covers shoulders and the skirts are longer than knee length. They've also put more focus on the careers, but she doesn't have a boyfriend :)

Iran also introduced dolls called Sara and Dara, but unlike Fulla, it's a girl/boy combo. :D

paintballworker
07-27-2013, 01:38 PM
All things nuclear fascinate me, from reactors to nuclear weapons, from Darlington to Hiroshima.

I wrote a essay(just for fun) on the evolution of nuclear weapons and their usage. My laptop's background is the famous Operation Crossroads-Baker shot.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bb/Operation_Crossroads_Baker_in_color.jpg
That black smuge is said to be the 27,000 ton USS Arkansas

klhanson
07-27-2013, 05:23 PM
elephants cant jump

Jester
07-27-2013, 07:12 PM
Madonna's last name is Ciccone. (At least, it was before any of her marriages. No idea if she ever changed it.) Her real first name really is Madonna.

Stevie Nicks' real first name is Stephanie. As a young child, she could not pronounce her own name, and it came out as Stevie. And that's how she got that nickname. Also, she's from my home state of Arizona.

As is David Spade, though if you ever hear him talk about it, he clearly loathes the place. To be fair, Nicks grew up in lovely Scottsdale, and Spade is from Casa Grande, which is far more like what most people think of Arizona (dry, dusty, desolate, and boring) than Scottsdale or the Phoenix area.

David Bowie's real name is David Jones, but he adapted the stage name of Bowie to avoid confusion with Davey Jones of The Monkees.

Alice Cooper's real name is Vincent Furnier.

Cider and all malt liquor beverages are, by the strictest definition, beer.

St. Augustine's claim of being the oldest city in America is only partially true. They are the oldest continuously inhabited city. There is an older city in New Mexico that was abandoned for a time early in its history. But at least St. Augustine can claim oldest city in Florida without dispute!

The International Swimming Hall of Fame is in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Garlic is a member of the lily family.

The oldest logo/trademark it the world is the red star of Bass Ale fame.

The first North American football team, college or pro, to put an emblem, logo, or decoration on their helmets other than a stripe was the Cleveland Rams, when before a game, one of their receivers painted horns on his helmet.

Jester's Bar Bet tip: wager someone a drink they can't tell you which of the 32 current NFL franchises is the oldest continuously run franchise. Rare is the person that will know that the answer is the Arizona Cardinals, founded in 1898 as the Morgan Athletic Club, and run continuously since, through several cities. They were founded 23 years before the NFL officially formed. (I'm a great one for NFL trivia!)

Arizona Iced Tea is made in New York.
Arizona Jeans Company is based in Chicago.

Key West got its name because English-speakers tend to butcher the language. No, seriously! When the original pirates first found Key West, the found an uninhibited island that mysteriously had tons of human skeletons scattered across it. So they named it "Island of Bones." Since they were Spanish, the actual name was "Cayo Hueso." (Pronounced KIE-oh WAY-so.) When the English came along, they mangled "Cayo Hueso" into "Key West." And THAT is why a bunch of islands off the southern tip of Florida are called "Keys" rather than islands.

Andrew B.
07-27-2013, 07:48 PM
George Custer was only a Brevet Major General during the American Civil War. Afterward he was a Lt. Colonel. He was also acting in direct violation of his orders at the time of his infamous last stand.

Lady Legira
07-27-2013, 09:19 PM
There is a Maize Maze Assocation in the UK

BookstoreEscapee
07-27-2013, 10:09 PM
Leonard DiCaprio was kicked off the set of Romper Room at age 5 for being disruptive.

NecessaryCatharsis
07-28-2013, 12:10 AM
I love random trivia!

Speaking of which, trivia is latin for three roads; in ancient Rome where three or more roads met the Romans would put up signs with bits of news and information on them.

wolfie
07-28-2013, 04:24 AM
A group of baboons is called a "flange". This was made up for a comedy show called "Not the Nine O'Clock News", somehow made its way into a scientific usage, and is now the official term for it.

The name for the collection of spikes on a Stegosaurus' tail is a "Thagomizer". That's another one that found its way from pop culture (in this case, a Far Side cartoon) to scientific usage.

On a lighter note, Barbie's (the doll's) full name is Barbara Millicent Roberts.

Mattel's advertising implies that Barbie and Ken are girlfriend and boyfriend. Their names are actually taken from a real-life brother/sister pair :eek: (I believe they're the children of the chief designer). Barbie was also "inspired" by a German "adult" gag doll.

Cider and all malt liquor beverages are, by the strictest definition, beer.

I'd call a "no" on this. Under the strictest definition (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavarian_purity_law), cider and "malt liquor" are, by definition, NOT beer.

El Pollo Guerrera
07-28-2013, 05:21 AM
David Bowie's real name is David Jones, but he adapted the stage name of Bowie to avoid confusion with Davey Jones of The Monkees.

Movie director Duncan Jones ("Moon", "Source Code", the upcoming "World of Warcraft" movie) is David Bowie's son.

Remember Peter Billingsley?
http://www.thecinemasource.com/moviesdb/images/A_Christmas_Story_2_Disc_Special_Edition-DVD_Contest-Peter_Billingsley.jpg
He directs and produces movies now... including this:
http://images.moviepostershop.com/couples-retreat-movie-poster-2009-1010512375.jpg

sms001
07-28-2013, 01:14 PM
elephants cant jump

I actually knew this one. And thank goodness they don't! Scarey freaky :eek:



Jester's Bar Bet tip: wager someone a drink they can't tell you which of the 32 current NFL franchises is the oldest continuously run franchise. Rare is the person that will know that the answer is the Arizona Cardinals,

Only knew this from living amongst St. Lousians for so long.
'nother good bar bet/random trivia: Name the only two days no professional sports are played in the United States....


Speaking of whick, trivia is latin for three roads; in ancient Rome where three or more roads met the Romas would put up signs with bits of news and information on them.

lol. Two common Latin terms, and I never put any thought into their application to "trivia." Now I know.

bhskittykatt
07-28-2013, 01:31 PM
A sand spit connecting two pieces of land together is called a trombolo.

EricKei
07-28-2013, 01:42 PM
I would say that this thread has truly embiggened us all....What? It's a perfectly cromulent word!



On US food labels, the terms "lite" and "light" are effectively interchangeable according to the USDA, and may refer to lower amounts of certain components such as fat, sodium, or sugar (must be 50% less than the brand's "normal" version of the same product -- note that a drop in one often means more of the others), or calories (must have 33% fewer)....or, when the term is not specifically elaborated upon, simply the color of the product itself. Yes, this means that, say, chocolate ice cream that isn't quite as dark a brown as the company's "standard" chocolate ice cream (and is otherwise identical) can be legally labeled as "light" or "lite" ice cream, as long as they do not claim to have altered the nutritional content in any way.

fireheart
07-28-2013, 01:54 PM
If you happen to be at a zoo, you cannot tell spotted hyenas apart by glancing at their genitalia: the females appear to look like the males. (seriously)

Jester
07-28-2013, 02:55 PM
I'd call a "no" on this. Under the strictest definition (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavarian_purity_law), cider and "malt liquor" are, by definition, NOT beer.

Well played, sir. You are correct that the German Beer Purity Law is strict. But it is not the strictest definition of what beer is, merely the strictest law of what is allowed to be sold as beer in Germany. It's a small difference, but it is a difference.

So, while ciders and malt liquors would not be allowed to be sold as beer in Germany, they are still technically beer.

'nother good bar bet/random trivia: Name the only two days no professional sports are played in the United States....

The two days after the baseball all star game.

fireheart
07-28-2013, 03:12 PM
Some Pokemon anime trivia time!

-apparently the GS ball (featured in the orange island and johto arcs) was going to contain celebi and she/he/it would travel with ash and company for a while. They eventually decided to out celebi in the movie instead and the idea was scrapped.

-according to a staff member, the reason why they replaced Brock in the orange islands saga was because at the time, Pokemon was becoming more prominent overseas and they didn't want people getting the idea that Brock was a stereotype and/or a racist joke (compared to the more white-bread ash and misty). Hence the introduction of the most random travelling companion in the series.

-while the dub of the series keeps the pikachu sound bites from the Japanese version, in the first series, another actress had to provide the voice dubbing for pikachu when they couldn't fix the audio.

-in Pokemon black and white, the gym leaders for the first gym are known as cilan, cress and chili in the dub. Their names in the sub? Dent, pod and corn.

-and finally, one of pikachus moves in the series (volt tackle) is actually one of the rarest moves you can get. The ONLY way you can get hold of it, is if you breed a pikachu or a raichu holding a light ball, with a ditto or any of the other Pokemon it can breed with. The resulting pichu will know volt tackle. Other Pokemon will have it during events.

Dasota
07-28-2013, 05:37 PM
The tastiest part of a human is the bit of meat below the thumb on the palm of your hand.

The reason why you jerk awake when say falling asleep on the couch or at your desk is an evolutionary trick we learned from living in trees. Cuz if you fell asleep and fell forward, you'd fall to your death, thus we jerk awake to prevent ourselves from falling over.

The reason why we go "ssshhh" to crying babies and the like? It's the sound a snake makes, and so we instill fear subconsciously and get them to be quiet or else the snake will find them and eat them.

Jester
07-28-2013, 05:56 PM
The tastiest part of a human is the bit of meat below the thumb on the palm of your hand.

This brings up not one, but two pressing questions.

1. How do you know this?

2. How can it be stated objectively that something is the "tastiest," when the level of tastiness something has is a purely subjective thing?

sms001
07-28-2013, 06:00 PM
Name the only two days no professional sports are played in the United States....


The two days after the baseball all star game.

Glad this came up - my answer's always been "The day before and after the All-Star game" but apparently you're right, they had two days after in 2012 and this year. Good - makes the question lean people more toward holidays. :) (And I guess I'll start rephrasing is as "games" also - for those morons who think of the Derby as sport...)

... pressing questions.
How do you know this?


Glad someone asked....

CoffeeMonkey
07-30-2013, 04:06 PM
Light roast coffee has more caffeine than dark roast coffee. This is because the roasting process breaks caffeine down, much like how alcohol is cooked out of a sauce.

Also like alcohol in sauce, it's nigh impossible to get ALL the caffeine out of coffee. Trace amounts remain.

Both of these facts are a complete surprise to a lot of people. For some (those who insist that they cannot have even a micron of caffeine, else they would surely die...but they still drink decaf or eat chocolate. Or those that are unhappy because you're out of dark roast coffee and the light roast isn't strong enough) it's like telling a cat that cream is bad for it. It's true, but they refuse to listen.

Seraph
07-30-2013, 05:16 PM
Those little white ketchup/condiment cups you get at restaurants are meant to be expanded. That's why they have the little folded sides.

mjr
07-30-2013, 06:31 PM
The "French" in "French Fries" does not refer to the country, but the type of cut, a "french cut".

The Hundred Years' War actually lasted 116 years.

The Battle of Bunker Hill was not fought on Bunker Hill, but actually at Breed's Hill, nearby.

fireheart
07-31-2013, 02:46 AM
In Australia, Burger King restaurants are known as hungry jacks. This is due to the fact that when they originally expanded to the Aussie market, the name was trademarked by a takeaway shop in Adelaide. :D

protege
07-31-2013, 04:28 AM
The Porsche 911 was originally to be called the 901. It was only afterwards that French automaker Peugeot claimed a copyright on three-digit model numbers with a central zero.

When British manufacturer Morris was about to launch their Minor in '48, the car was judged too narrow. A completed car was cut down the middle. The two halves were then pulled apart a few inches. That's why the cars have the raised 'hump' on the hood and the painted metal plates on the bumpers.

...and not to be left out. The first 750cc car to exceed 100mph was an MG C-Type in 1931.

gremcint
07-31-2013, 05:38 AM
No, really. Tell me something I don't know.

I can push a broom with my belly button.

El Pollo Guerrera
07-31-2013, 07:51 AM
Pro wrestling trivia...

Mick Foley/Mankind's finishing move The Mandible Claw was developed by a wrestler named Sam Sheppard, who wrestled in the '60's. Sheppard was more well known as a former surgeon who was convicted of murdering his wife in the '50's after a lengthy trial, and later acquitted in the '60's because of blood spatter evidence. That trial became the basis for the television series (and popular 1993 movie) "The Fugitive". Sheppard turned to wrestling because no medical facility wanted to be associated with him, even after his acquittal.

Sunshine
08-01-2013, 06:50 AM
So a less personal one...all my random trivia left me before. A group of butterflies is called a schmeterling in german. I apologize if i misspelled that!!

MaggieTheCat
08-01-2013, 07:58 AM
Nobuo Uematsu, the composer of a lot of the music from the Final Fantasy series, has a personal rock band that he conducts/plays with. They play a combination of original songs and remixes of Final Fantasy (and other video game) music that Uematsu wrote. The band used to be called The Black Mages when Uematsu and a couple of the other members were employees of SquareSoft/SquareEnix. When Uematsu left the company to become a contractor, The Black Mages were disbanded. His band is now called The Earthbound Papas. One of their first "solo" (not part of a bigger concert like Distant Worlds) live performance in the United States was in 2011 at OniCon in Galveston, TX.

SailorMan
08-01-2013, 02:28 PM
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, urinals had bees printed or stamped in their bottoms - this was for the amusement of educated gentlemen: the Latin for bee was `apis.`

BookstoreEscapee
08-01-2013, 02:37 PM
The Battle of Bunker Hill was not fought on Bunker Hill, but actually at Breed's Hill, nearby.


Nathaniel Philbrick has a new book about the Battle of Bunker Hill (http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/bunker-hill-nathaniel-philbrick/1113858316?ean=9780670025442).

dalesys
08-01-2013, 04:16 PM
Grace Slick (Jefferson Airplane/Starship) was a magazine glamour model.
Janis Joplin was a folksinger.

SongsOfDragons
08-01-2013, 05:51 PM
In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, urinals had bees printed or stamped in their bottoms - this was for the amusement of educated gentlemen: the Latin for bee was `apis.`

:D

I've seen those too. I always thought it was there to give them something to aim at to reduce splashing. ;)

drunkenwildmage
08-01-2013, 06:03 PM
In Australia, Burger King restaurants are known as hungry jacks. This is due to the fact that when they originally expanded to the Aussie market, the name was trademarked by a takeaway shop in Adelaide. :D

In Central Illinois,(USA) there is a town called Mattoon that has ma and pa restaurant called Burger King that traded marked the name in Illinois before the fast food place started. As a result of the trademark, and court cases, the fast food place can't build a restaurant withing a 20 mile circle of the ma and pa restaurant, and call it Burger King.



Onto other Random Crap..


The developer of the neighborhood I'm current living in, is the father of one of the founding members of the rock band 'Boston'.

EricKei
08-01-2013, 06:44 PM
What most Americans call "yams" are almost always sweet potatoes. Actual yams are a tuber that grows in (generally) hotter climates. Actual sweet potatoes are part of the Morning Glory family. "New Zealand yams" are actually oca, yet another tuber. Actually. :yes::yes::yes::yes:

New Orleanians often use the term "making groceries" to refer to grocery shopping. They also use the term "brake tag" to refer to (usually annual) vehicle inspection stickers.
In Australia, Burger King restaurants are known as hungry jacks. This is due to the fact that when they originally expanded to the Aussie market, the name was trademarked by a takeaway shop in Adelaide. :D
HJ might have had to change their name if they had originally been Aussie and moved to the US ;) -- "Hungry Jack" is the name of a popular line of pancake/potato (etc) mixes here.

AnaKhouri
08-02-2013, 02:38 AM
I live quite literally about two miles from a bar that is so haunted it is called "The Gate to Hell". I've been in it once, experienced nothing but lots of drunk women falling off the mechanical bull, unfortunately.

EricKei
08-02-2013, 05:37 AM
The infamous Jolt Cola, which has 2X the caffeine of regular Coke, has HALF as much caffeine per unit volume as regular coffee.

Can you guess which one of these drinks is/was banned at one point in several states, at least in one case because a death was blamed on it?

fireheart
08-02-2013, 06:47 AM
The infamous Jolt Cola, which has 2X the caffeine of regular Coke, has HALF as much caffeine per unit volume as regular coffee.

Can you guess which one of these drinks is/was banned at one point in several states, at least in one case because a death was blamed on it?

You can still get JOLT down here. Unfortunately because energy drinks tend to be associated with the "buzz" you'd get from jolt, it doesn't sell that well.

Random fact of the day: the infamous fifty shades trilogy was originally a twilight fan fiction. :D (yes I know you folks know it already shut up)

firecat88
08-02-2013, 05:26 PM
I finished the last volume of the manga last night, so brace yourselves for some Sailor Moon trivia:

~ Not long before the first chapter of Sailor Moon was published, Naoko Takeuchi wrote another story called Codename: Sailor V. Originally intended to be a one-shot about Minako Aino, it became so popular that it turned into a 16-chapter story that ran alongside Sailor Moon's publication. Both series even ended at roughly the same time because, despite being shorter, Codename: Sailor V was published at a much slower pace.

~ The first thirteen episodes of the anime's second season have no tie-in to the manga. They were written exclusively by Toei in an attempt to give the manga (which, at the time, had only one storyline and nothing else) a chance to catch up to the anime. Which is why everything from that part of the season is never seen or heard from again in later seasons.

~ The reason Usagi has odangos is because Takeuchi often wore the hairstyle when she was in college.

~ Ever wonder why Chibiusa's hair is pink? Just look at the first draft design (http://static1.minitokyo.net/view/19/31/501569.jpg) of some of the characters. Originally, Usagi was going to have pink hair, but the idea was scrapped by the editor. The pink hair was still snuck in, though, in the form of Chibiusa. This has sparked much controversy and debate amongst the fans. Mostly the anti-Mamoru section who use it to claim that he and Usagi never really did have a kid together.

~ There are actually five storylines in the manga and, thus, five seasons of the anime. The last season, Stars, has never aired in any English-speaking country. The possible reasons for why range from Toei wanting more money for licensing, Cloverway losing its license, and the season having too much mature content. It did, however, air in non-English-speaking countries (The German dub of the final episode is fantastic) without any trouble.

~ The 'make up!' at the end of their transformation phrases supposedly comes from Takeuchi's wanting them to have transformation phrases, but without using the word 'transform' as it sounded too mecha.

~ Before the series was dubbed into English, DiC and a company called ToonMakers toyed with the idea of just making an American version of the show that would be loosely based on the original but have its own animation. Moreover, it was going to be half-animated and half-live action. Concept art and animation cels for the project can be found on eBay, and the trailer/music video/theme song for it can be found on YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODz7ankdTHw) (watch at your own risk, though, because...yikes). This idea, known as Saban Moon to the fandom despite Saban having no involvement, never made it to fruition. It was decided that doing an English dub of the original would be easier and less costly.

Seraph
08-02-2013, 07:54 PM
Speaking of Sailor Moon....

The reason why Sailor Stars was never aired in the USA was because Toei was TICKED at how the English dubbing companies handled it all. The overediting of scenes, and then the change of Uranus and Neptune to "cousins" made them so furious, that they refused to license it out.

That's why it's so amazingly hard to get a hold of the anime here in the USA, now. Toei was burnt.

Tama
08-02-2013, 08:20 PM
Wow. I mean, I know they couldn't do that they were gay, but cousins only?

Same for Malachite and Zoicite.

firecat88
08-02-2013, 08:41 PM
Speaking of Sailor Moon....

The reason why Sailor Stars was never aired in the USA was because Toei was TICKED at how the English dubbing companies handled it all. The overediting of scenes, and then the change of Uranus and Neptune to "cousins" made them so furious, that they refused to license it out.

That's why it's so amazingly hard to get a hold of the anime here in the USA, now. Toei was burnt.

So it really was because of that? o.o Oh wow. I'd heard that listed as one of the possible reasons, but I didn't know it was *the* one. Makes sense, though, given how heavily butchered the English dub was. If the new series gets an English dub, hopefully they'll learn from past mistakes (read: Not do anything that the first dub did).

Ophbalance
08-02-2013, 09:15 PM
How about this. Did you know that Pennsylvania had an NFL team other than the Eagles and Steelers? Pottsville PA, which is home to Yuengling, was also the former home of the Maroons. They only played in the '20s, and through controversy lost the NFL champion title in '25. Their home field has since become a strip mall with a really kick ass italian restaurant. There's a pub dedicated to them just down the road from the office I used to work in before moving to NC.

EricKei
08-02-2013, 09:19 PM
SM: I know they changed a number of the characters to different genders, too x.x

Anyhoo...back to the facts:

Nintendo, the huge game company/console maker, got its start as a maker of playing cards...in the 1800's.

Ever heard of a tiny little game development house called Squaresoft (now Square-Enix)? Back in the 80's, they were coming precariously close to going bankrupt. Given the choice between going out with a *pfft* and betting the farm on a huge risk, they opted for the latter. They made a Famicom (nee NES) game whose name was an overt reference to the distinct possibility of their impending doom. The game's name?

Final Fantasy.

lupo pazzesco
08-03-2013, 12:21 AM
Random food factoids:

1. A banana tree is not a fruit tree, but more of a giant herb. The banana itself is more a berry.

2. The Arab culture invented caramel...to be used as a depilatory on harem women, not to be eaten.

3. The first soup dates back to about 6000 BC...and was made out of hippopotamus

4. During the Middle Ages, a lemon slice was served with fish, not for flavor, but because it was believed that it would dissolve any bones that were accidentally swallowed.

5. Atila the Hun's warriors preserved their meat by placing fresh portions under their saddles. Continuous riding caused bouncing, which pressed out the moisture, and the sweat from the horse preserved the meat, and removed more moisture. Whenever they stopped? They'd have dried, salted meat to eat.

6. You might know that bread is considered a prime symbol of nourishment, and sharing bread is a symbolic gesture of companionship in most cultures. But did you know companion is derived from two Latin words "com" for together and "panis" for bread? Really does bring people together!

7. A row of corn always has an even number.

8. Americans will eat, on average, 28 pigs in their lifetimes. That's a lot of bacon!

Jester
08-03-2013, 02:30 AM
How about this. Did you know that Pennsylvania had an NFL team other than the Eagles and Steelers?

Related trivia: during World War II, back when professional athletes joining the military was the standard, not the exception, with a dearth of pro football players, the Eagles and Steelers merged into one team, often dubbed "the Steagles."

2. The Arab culture invented caramel...to be used as a depilatory on harem women, not to be eaten.

Bless those Arabs, even if they were misguided in their intent. (Caramel fiend here.)

3. The first soup dates back to about 6000 BC...and was made out of hippopotamus

Hippopotato soup. Makes sense.

8. Americans will eat, on average, 28 pigs in their lifetimes. That's a lot of bacon!

Some of us strive to be better than average. Jester Twin powers, BACONIZE!!!

Seshat
08-03-2013, 12:21 PM
On Australia's bicentennial expedition to the summit of Mt Everest, one of the climbers didn't make it to the top - because he had a math test he wanted to get to, back in Australia.

When his mother and his wife unpacked his gear for him back home, the interior of his tent was COMPLETELY covered with math equations.

That climber was/is James Strofeldt, my cousin, who has more graduate degrees than I can be bothered to keep track of.

He no longer climbs (or not seriously). He shattered his right forearm on a climb, and had to get the "second-best" osteo surgeon in Victoria to fix it. Why second-best? His description. Before he broke the arm, he was also an osteo surgeon.

He's now practicing psychiatry.

His brother is also a climber; but prefers rock climbing to mountain climbing. And once rode a motorbike across the Nullarbor Desert without bothering to tell anyone where he was going or when he expected to make it back. (Fireheart: this was before most of the current safety features were in place.)

bhskittykatt
08-04-2013, 10:50 AM
A wild baby bear is cute, up until you see mama bear. Then it becomes terrifying.

Your kid can make great bear bait as you flee to safety.

CoffeeMonkey
08-04-2013, 02:05 PM
A wild baby bear is cute, up until you see mama bear. Then it becomes terrifying.

Your kid can make great bear bait as you flee to safety.

Remember, you don't have to outrun the dragon. You only have to run faster than the slowest member of the party.

Jester
08-05-2013, 07:35 AM
Or to put it the way I always heard it, you don't have to be faster than the bear, you just have to be faster than the guy behind you. :lol:

NateTheChops
08-05-2013, 08:34 AM
The Purpose of "knocking on wood" is to awaken Wood Sprites to grant you wish. When Christian's adopted the practice it was said to be the same as knocking on the true cross, which makes no sense really.


Speaking of things Christians are widely known to believe in, your post is the 666th, often referred to as the number of The Beast.

Arcus
08-05-2013, 09:37 AM
Let's see... Here are a few random things


Donald Duck's middle name is Fauntleroy.

When business was slow in the early days of the Boeing Company, they had their woodworkers make furniture.

Henry Ford was a proponent of hiring the handicapped. In 1919, more than 20% of his workforce had some form of disability.

Dr. Seuss's real name was Theodor Seuss Geisel.

Pentheraphobia is the persistent fear of your mother-in-law.

In an average NFL football game there are only about 12 minutes of actual play time.

The Kit Kat bar got its name from the Kit Kat Club in London’s West End, a joint famous for bringing dance-band music to the city in the 1920s.

The hole in your shirt that you put your arm through is called an armsaye.

bhskittykatt
08-05-2013, 10:24 AM
Speaking of things Christians are widely known to believe in, your post is the 666th, often referred to as the number of The Beast.

In 2005, a fragment of papyrus (Papyrus 115) containing the earliest known version of the part of Book of Revelations that discusses that number gave 616 as the number. This agrees with other early manuscripts, indicating that it may have been the original number. The different numbers seem to correspond to different spellings of Emperor Nero/Neron's name, and was likely a code for that name. (Source: Wikipedia)

fireheart
08-05-2013, 11:20 AM
Dr. Seuss's real name was Theodor Seuss Geisel.


Speaking of Dr. Seuss, his publisher once bet him that he couldn't write a story using 50 different words. He proved him wrong. The book?

Green Eggs and Ham.

The Cat In The Hat contains 225 words.

dawnfire
08-05-2013, 01:23 PM
Speaking of Dr. Seuss, his publisher once bet him that he couldn't write a story using 50 different words. He proved him wrong. The book?

Green Eggs and Ham.

The Cat In The Hat contains 225 words.

and as a parent I have a love-hate relationship with that book. try not to be pulling your hair out after reading it 3 times in a row :lol:

Antisocial_Worker
08-05-2013, 03:18 PM
Run your tongue up the inside of your incisors. Do you feel a vertical trench running up the inside of the tooth, deeper at the top near the gum than at the bottom? If so, congratulations -- you have a fairly significant amount of either Asian or Native American heritage in your lineage. Native Americans and Asians are the only two populations in the world whose teeth bear that trench, which comes in handy (as you might imagine) should a skeleton be found. Helps narrow things down.

dalesys
08-05-2013, 09:21 PM
and as a parent I have a love-hate relationship with that book. try not to be pulling your hair out after reading it 3 times in a row :lol:
Do like my mom... tell them the story of the Pea Little Thrigs and the Wig Wah'd Bolf...

You'll have them jumping like popcorn in a popper.:devil:

TheSHAD0W
08-05-2013, 11:22 PM
The last state to join the USA was...

No, not Hawaii...

No, not Alaska...

It was Ohio? In 1953? Really?

Durp, I was wrong. It actually was Hawaii, in Dec '59. But Ohio was an unexpected 3rd from last.

Jester
08-06-2013, 12:13 AM
Durp, I was wrong. It actually was Hawaii, in Dec '59. But Ohio was an unexpected 3rd from last.

Still wrong, I'm afraid. And I don't just say this as someone from the State that WAS the third from last, Arizona in 1912. (We're Number 48!)

No, I say this because you have been fed some bad info, kiddo. I know, I know, there was some confusion a while back about the legitimacy of Onio's 1803 induction in the Union as the 17th State. But it was legitimate, and the confusion and why the original induction was actually legitimate is addressed here (http://www.thegreenpapers.com/slg/explanation-ohio-statehood.phtml).

joe20girl
08-06-2013, 03:08 AM
peanut butter has the same taste and texture coming up, as going down....

Tyg3rW01f
08-06-2013, 03:12 AM
okay, it's SHARK WEEK!!!

But I have an odd question that seems like a DUH, but it may not be: WHY is a Great White's breach attack (http://www.apexpredators.com/photography/images/Great_White_Shar_4c44452f52efc.jpg)called a "Polaris Breach"? I mean, does it have something to do with the fact that the longest-serving vert-launch missile in the Navy is the Polaris?

EricKei
08-06-2013, 02:37 PM
All Clownfish are born male (http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/why-clownfish-changes-sex). When it's time to mate, if there are no females around, the dominant male switches teams, so to speak.

sms001
08-06-2013, 06:48 PM
try not to be pulling your hair out after reading it 3 times in a row

You do not like it, Sam-I-Am?

:lol:

BTW, a little OT, but I remember this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPxPciXcJvc) fondly to this day. Rev. Jesse Jackson's rendition...

mjr
08-06-2013, 07:49 PM
All Clownfish are born male (http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/why-clownfish-changes-sex). When it's time to mate, if there are no females around, the dominant male switches teams, so to speak.

A specific species of Anglerfish has an interesting way of mating...

The males are significantly smaller than the females, and their sole "purpose" is to find and mate with a female. If they don't, they'll starve.

The male anglerfish essentially bites the female, and releases an enzyme that essentially fuses the two together. At some point, the male anglerfish atrophies, and it looks like the female has parasites attached to her.

mjr
08-06-2013, 07:51 PM
You do not like it, Sam-I-Am?

:lol:

BTW, a little OT, but I remember this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPxPciXcJvc) fondly to this day. Rev. Jesse Jackson's rendition...

There's also a version of "The Cat in the Hat" written in Latin...It's called "Cattus Petasatus"

SongsOfDragons
08-06-2013, 08:31 PM
A specific species of Anglerfish has an interesting way of mating...

The males are significantly smaller than the females, and their sole "purpose" is to find and mate with a female. If they don't, they'll starve.

The male anglerfish essentially bites the female, and releases an enzyme that essentially fuses the two together. At some point, the male anglerfish atrophies, and it looks like the female has parasites attached to her.

On this episode of 'Adventurous Sex of the Animal Kingdom'...

Flatworms!!

Flatworms and their epic mating sport of Penis fencing!!! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Penis_fencing)

They wage battle with each other, vying to be the one to stab the other first in this, the sport of invertebrate kings. The loser verily becomes the mother.

:D

Tama
08-06-2013, 09:45 PM
Funny you should mention the male anglerfish.

How the male angler fish gets completely screwed (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/angler)

BookstoreEscapee
08-07-2013, 03:34 AM
Funny you should mention the male anglerfish.

How the male angler fish gets completely screwed (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/angler)


Speaking of The Oatmeal...I met Matthew Inman in May and got a free autographed copy of My Dog, The Paradox. :D

The girl two ahead of me in line brought him a crocheted version of the dog that she had made. He drew a special picture in her book.

Matthew Inman is cute.

fireheart
08-07-2013, 04:32 AM
And I was wondering how many pages we'd get through until we had animal sex references.

Here's a fact/rumour that's been going around for a while:

In a number of high schools (and some private schools) in my state, students who test particularly well are known as SHIP students. It stands for Students with High Intellectual Potential. (I JUST missed the cutoff for that). Closest equivalent in the US would be honor students/AP students.

Usually the SHIP programs have students doing accelerated work in Years 8-10 and in Year 10, they may or may not do some high school certificate topics. :) For the non-academic topics (Languages, PE, Arts, Tech and Home Ec), they usually mix with the "normal" students.

The original name for the program? Students with High Intellectual Talent.

Yeah.....you can see why they changed it :lol:

Seshat
08-07-2013, 09:31 AM
The feedback loop that causes the literally heart-stopping illness neurocardiogenic syncope is the biological equivalent of a mathematical/computer science negative feedback loop. Or more precisely, one which has gone out of control: there's supposed to be both 'faster' and 'slower' signals to the heart, and an NCG Syncope attack occurs when the heart only gets the 'slower' signals.

The correspondence between the two fields was discovered when a computer scientist (my husband) developed NCG Syncope, and was referred to one of the research cardiologists in the field in Victoria, Australia. The cardiologist started explaining what was going on biologically to my husband - and then the pair of them geeked out as they realised what they'd found.

Sadly, that hasn't - yet - resulted in a way of resolving the biological version. But it's expanded the understanding of the condition.

Jester
08-07-2013, 11:45 AM
BTW, a little OT, but I remember this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPxPciXcJvc) fondly to this day. Rev. Jesse Jackson's rendition...

Freakin'. Hilarious.

AnaKhouri
08-07-2013, 03:11 PM
Contrary to popular belief, research scientists party like it's 1999 whenever they get the chance. These guys can DRINK.

(information courtesy of my husband, a research scientist)

fireheart
08-08-2013, 04:29 AM
I am assuming that MOST people on here would have seen or heard The Wiggles in some shape or form. Here's a few fun facts about them I've picked up recently (this is referring to the ORIGINAL group, not the new ones)

-Greg, Anthony and Murray were all studying to become preschool teachers and formed The Wiggles during or shortly after that time period. Of those three, Murray actually taught at a preschool for two years before the Wiggles became a hit.

-Of the different "shticks" that the Wiggles (and the characters) have, Jeff's came about originally because he was the only one without a early childhood background and he didn't have to do much at the time. (that is, he could just fall asleep :p)

-When the Wiggles first started, the roles of Henry the Octopus and Captain Feathersword were originally done by Jeff and Anthony respectively. Jeff still did the voice when other actors took over the bodysuit.

-The finger wiggle they do whenever they're with children originally came about after seeing bowlers do it on TV, but it also serves another purpose: with their hands in that pose, it prevents them from being sued by a parent claiming that one of the Wiggles touched their kid inappropriately.

-In their early performances, Anthony's shirt was green. They chose blue so that kids wouldn't mix him and Dorothy the Dinosaur up.

-Again with the early performances/videos, if you look closely, the Wiggles would intentionally make mistakes in their routines so kids could identify with them better. :D

El Pollo Guerrera
08-08-2013, 06:22 AM
The song "You Suffer" by Napalm Death (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybGOT4d2Hs8) is in the Guinness Book of World Records. It is the world's shortest recorded song, coming in at a heavy 1.316 seconds.

42_42_42
08-08-2013, 06:30 AM
One of my ancestors, Walter de Tirel, shot the arrow that (supposedly accidentally) killed King William Rufus (the son of William the Conqueror).

The element Hydrogen consists of only a single Proton and a single Electron. As a result, the positive ionic form is equal to a proton and H+ is used interchangeably with "proton" in much of chemistry.

Dmitri Mendeleev created the periodic table in 1869. Only elements 1-98 exist naturally, elements 99 and up have only been synthesized in the lab, existing for mirco-seconds only.

Contrary to the Paleo diet, humans have been harvesting, processing, cooking, and eating grains for at least 12,000 years.

Cheesecake is really a type of custard pie.
Boston Crème Pie is really a type of cake.

Woad, the blue pigment used by Iron Age British warriors as a type of camouflage, is derived from the leaves of a plant (Isatis tinctoria). These leaves are dried, ground and then the resulting powder is mixed with rendered beef fat, the whites of eggs, or semen and then rubbed over the entire body. British warriors would go to battle wearing only this paint.

The carnyx, the Iron Age British/Celtic war trumpet, produced a sound louder than the loudest modern wind instrument, the trombone.

Water is the only substance where the maximum density is not achieved when it is solidified. A given volume of ice will weigh less (have less mass) than the same volume of liquid water. If you were to freeze a liter of water, in the frozen state, it would weigh the same (have the same mass) as it did when it was liquid; the volume, however, would no longer be 1 liter, it would now be 1 liter plus 9 centiliters. This is the reason ice floats: as it solidifies, it becomes less dense.

Dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) is so called because it sublimates: when exposed to temperatures of −78.5 °C (−109.3 °F) or above it changes from a solid to a gas instantaneously without passing through the liquid phase.

Pure sodium (as in sodium chloride, or salt) when exposed to water will explode, forming sodium hydroxide and hydrogen gas (even the moisture in the air can cause this reaction). Fortunately, the element does not exist in its pure form in nature. Chlorine, in it's pure gas form, is highly toxic (this is the gas used in WWI to such disastrous effect). Both elements (chlorine in it's ionic form as chloride) are required for all known species of animal (chloride is needed for all forms of life).

SongsOfDragons
08-08-2013, 12:11 PM
One of my ancestors, Walter de Tirel, shot the arrow that (supposedly accidentally) killed King William Rufus (the son of William the Conqueror).

:) The Rufus Stone is an attraction in the New Forest on the location of the death, and is a Victorian triangular prism in black stone carved with the story. The actual medieval stone is hidden inside because it was being gradually worn down.

The New Forest is 'new' because Will the Bastard ;) decreed it was his new hunting ground when he conquered England. The name stuck. The word 'forest' originally had nothing to do with trees; it denoted a deer park.

Today the New Forest is still common land and people who live there are allowed to graze their livestock freely. As a result locals are used to feral horses and donkeys and wandering cows everywhere, crossing the roads with impunity and nomming on people's gardens; driveways have cattle grids in them. :D

Pure sodium (as in sodium chloride, or salt) when exposed to water will explode, forming sodium hydroxide and hydrogen gas (even the moisture in the air can cause this reaction). Fortunately, the element does not exist in its pure form in nature. Chlorine, in it's pure gas form, is highly toxic (this is the gas used in WWI to such disastrous effect). Both elements (chlorine in it's ionic form as chloride) are required for all known species of animal (chloride is needed for all forms of life).

What happens when you lob a two-pound block of Sodium into a lake?

Yes it's been done, and nobody died!! :D

http://www.theodoregray.com/PeriodicTable/Stories/011.2/

Aethian
08-08-2013, 01:32 PM
The Burma uprising happened in today's date in 1988.

So 8-8-88.

Bardmaiden
08-08-2013, 07:10 PM
The longest note held in a pop song was sung by Morten Harket, lead singer of the group A-Ha. In the song “Summer Moved On” released in 2000, he holds a note for 20.2 seconds.

I heard him sing it live and he held it for a good time then. :D That guy has a good pair of lungs and quite a voice. Also the packaging is rather nice ;)

bhskittykatt
08-08-2013, 09:06 PM
What happens when you lob a two-pound block of Sodium into a lake?

Yes it's been done, and nobody died!! :D

http://www.theodoregray.com/PeriodicTable/Stories/011.2/

In 1947 after the war, the War Assets Administration had barrels of surplus sodium to get rid of. The solution was to just dump them into a lake: http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=16a2dc6146

KellyHabersham
08-08-2013, 09:35 PM
Hitler was a high-school dropout.

Jester
08-08-2013, 11:48 PM
Cheesecake is really a type of custard pie.
Boston Crème Pie is really a type of cake.

The first one makes sense. The second one doesn't. I've had Boston Creme Pie. It is most certainly pie, not cake, unless the definitions have changed since my childhood.

Water is the only substance where the maximum density is not achieved when it is solidified. A given volume of ice will weigh less (have less mass) than the same volume of liquid water. If you were to freeze a liter of water, in the frozen state, it would weigh the same (have the same mass) as it did when it was liquid; the volume, however, would no longer be 1 liter, it would now be 1 liter plus 9 centiliters. This is the reason ice floats: as it solidifies, it becomes less dense.

Weight and mass are not interchangeable, identical properties, as you seem to indicate here. Just because something has less mass does not mean it has less weight. Now, that may be the case with water, but it is not always the case, as seems indicated here.

(Note that I say "seem." I have no idea what your intentions were. I was merely reacting to the way it read to me.

Jay 2K Winger
08-09-2013, 02:00 AM
The song "You Suffer" by Napalm Death (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybGOT4d2Hs8) is in the Guinness Book of World Records. It is the world's shortest recorded song, coming in at a heavy 1.316 seconds.

And here I thought it was "I'm So Sad, So Very, Very Sad" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYwWKEc8c88) by Crash and the Boys.

CoffeeMonkey
08-09-2013, 02:03 AM
Boston Cream Pie is two layers of vanilla cake with vanilla custard or pastry cream and topped with chocolate glaze or ganache. It is indeed a cake.

Pumpkin pie is also custard pie! There are two families of custards, stirred and baked. They both are defined as substances where the structure is formed by coagulated egg proteins. Pumpkin pie, cheesecake, creme brulee and creme caramel are all baked custards. Stirred custards are cooked on the stovetop, such as creme anglaise and pastry cream. French silk pie is filled with chocolate pastry cream, and thus is also custard pie.

...I love pie. so much.

Sunshine
08-09-2013, 02:19 AM
Piiiiiiiiiie. Cant think of a fact....be back later with one....After i eat some pie

42_42_42
08-09-2013, 04:53 AM
Weight and mass are not interchangeable, identical properties, as you seem to indicate here. Just because something has less mass does not mean it has less weight. Now, that may be the case with water, but it is not always the case, as seems indicated here.

(Note that I say "seem." I have no idea what your intentions were. I was merely reacting to the way it read to me.

Oh, I know mass =/= weight, but the average lay person doesn't. The average lay person says "weight" when what they really mean "mass."

Clear as mud?

El Pollo Guerrera
08-09-2013, 07:38 AM
Only one actor has ever won an Emmy for "Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series" and "Best Lead Actor in a Drama Series" playing the same character...

START SPOILER

Ed Asner in "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and "Lou Grant"

END SPOILER

Marmalady
08-09-2013, 08:30 AM
When a Lancaster bomber is started up, the No 3 (or starboard inner) engine is always started first because it drives the compressor that supplies air pressure for the radiator shutters and brakes.

Aethian
08-09-2013, 11:34 AM
Forum runner does not allow people to see the "whited out" spoilers. It would be great if we had a spoiler tag.

fireheart
08-09-2013, 01:01 PM
In a somewhat ironic twist, the TV show Thank God You're Here originated in Australia and lasted four seasons of around 10/11 episodes each, compared to the UK and US versions, which only lasted six or seven episodes each.

Why ironic? Several TV shows that have aired in the US and had Australia try to recreate their own version have not lasted as long as their US counterparts. This is so far the only instance I'm aware of where the REVERSE occurred. :D

(note to self: should I ever meet an alien, let him grope me) :p

sms001
08-09-2013, 04:18 PM
Only one actor has ever

I learned this yesterday, coincidentally. A FB friend had "I hate spunk." as their status, so while roaming around the various bios I ran across that fact.

I love serendipity.

AnaKhouri
08-09-2013, 08:09 PM
Oliver Reed was in the running to be the first James Bond, but the producers decided his real-life reputation was too bad for them to be associated with him (he was known as a heavy drinker and a womanizer prone to getting into violent fights). So Sean Connery was chosen instead.

Kind of ironic since James Bond is a heavy drinker and a womanizer prone to getting into violent fights. ;)

Sorry, he was in the running to be the second Bond and replace Connery, not the first Bond. I can't find the edit button for my last post, I'm sure I will see it as soon as I post this...:o

fireheart
08-13-2013, 10:59 AM
The book "The Very Hungry Caterpillar" was inspired in part, by a hole punch.

Crossbow
08-13-2013, 02:52 PM
The International Space Station is traveling so fast that if you play The Proclaimers song "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)" once through, the ISS will have traveled almost exactly 1000 miles.


Guess it beats walking.

crazylegs
08-13-2013, 05:34 PM
A defibrillator (the device used by medics to shock you during cardiac arrest) doesn't restart your heart, it stops it.

EricKei
08-14-2013, 07:33 AM
The book Fahrenheit 451 is about the evils of television and other mass media (including addiction to it and the resultant apparent "dumbing down" of people as a result), NOT about burning books or censorship. Well, at least according to some guy called Ray Bradbury, anyway, what would he know? ~_~ According to what is possibly urban legend, he has been "corrected" by at least one classroom audience during a speech about the work (at UCLA), causing him to walk out on them.
"Fahrenheit 451 is not about the topic of censorship. Rather, it is a story of how television destroys interest in reading literature, leading to a replacement of knowledge with “factoids”: partial information devoid of context." - attr. to Ray Bradbury
Some people refer to (roughly) 450F as the auto-ignition point of book paper; others say it's more like 450C. YMMV.

The book predicted, among other things: flat-screen TV's and "media walls", surround sound, the increasing spectre of the "death" of print media, and tiny little wireless electronic devices that sit in your ear that allow for 2-way communication over long distances -- in other words, Bluetooth headsets, wireless earbuds, and similar devices. IIRC, jetpacks, too, but we haven't quite mastered those. Yet. Oh yeah, and unmanned flying drones.

sms001
08-14-2013, 04:15 PM
The book Fahrenheit 451 ... NOT about burning books or censorship.

Saw a net pic along this line the other day - "You don't have to burn books if no one wants to read them." under a couch potato glued to his TV set.

Thanks for all the other info. Think it's time for a reread.

Mikkel
08-14-2013, 04:52 PM
It's some years ago I read Fahrenheit 451, but if it is about people not wanting to read books, why in the world should it be illegal to own them and why should firemen run around burning them?

EricKei
08-14-2013, 05:24 PM
Mikkel -- It's not so much that the people do not WANT to read books (some of them do, despite that being, in effect, a capital crime) -- it's that TV has supplanted print media completely, and books are seen as archaic and useless artifacts of the past in their society.

edit: started a thread on Fratching about the book, as I can see a discussion of its merits getting easily derailed and pushing that line ;) Please head on over that way if ya wanna join in the discussion (http://www.fratching.com/showthread.php?t=8251).

dalesys
08-14-2013, 09:32 PM
And then there are the bookleggers in A Canticle For Leibowitz...

PandaHat
08-14-2013, 11:09 PM
A defibrillator (the device used by medics to shock you during cardiac arrest) doesn't restart your heart, it stops it.

Yes indeed. Basically, in true IT style, you're trying turning the heart off and on again and hoping it reboots in a way that works.

SongsOfDragons
08-15-2013, 11:34 AM
Yes indeed. Basically, in true IT style, you're trying turning the heart off and on again and hoping it reboots in a way that works.

I remember not too long ago one of the medical practitioners on here - Sapphire Silk perhaps, I can't remember? - posted a fantastic old video about a doctor-lecturer guy doing a series of crazy little dances that demonstrated varying arrythmias of the heart and how the defib works at the end. :D It was so funny and informative too.

Tama
08-15-2013, 08:29 PM
So basically the defib is the biological equivalent of pushing the on/off button, holding, waiting for it to go off, rebooting, etc? Wow.

crazylegs
08-15-2013, 08:31 PM
So basically the defib is the biological equivalent of pushing the on/off button, holding, waiting for it to go off, rebooting, etc? Wow.

Pretty much.

A defib only works if there's some electrical activity going on in the heart, so if the heart is in asystole (flatlining) then there's no point in shocking the pt. This is why I get angry at medical dramas ;)

Tama
08-15-2013, 09:21 PM
What is SUPPOSED to happen for reviving them if they are flatlining?

EricKei
08-15-2013, 09:25 PM
Presumably, hope and/or prayer and/or "DAMMIT! NOT AGAIN! I WON'T LOSE THIS ONE!" or words to that effect. Other than that...? Pure dumb luck, I would suppose.

crazylegs
08-15-2013, 09:35 PM
What is SUPPOSED to happen for reviving them if they are flatlining?

ALS for asystole in the UK is CPR - 30 compressions to 2 rescue breaths (delivered by bag/valve/mask or airway device) and adrenaline delivered intravenously or via intraosseus access every 3-5 minutes.

The odds for getting someone back from asystole is unlikely if there's no reversible cause*. So again I get a bit shouty at the TV. A resus is most certainly not like it's portrayed - it's messy, brutal and can be very difficult to watch. Intubation (passing a tube into the throat for a definitive airway) is also far harder than it's portrayed on the TV and in the UK there are moves away from calling it a gold standard and allowing practitioners to simply use whatever works for that patient.

For a much better written synopsis here's the UK resus council algorithm :)

http://www.resus.org.uk/pages/als.pdf

*Reversible Causes
Hypoxia
Hypothermia
Hypoglycemia (and other metabolic disorders)
Hypovolaemia

Tamponade (cardiac
Thromboembolic obstruction
Tension pneumothorax
Toxins

sms001
08-16-2013, 01:28 AM
What is SUPPOSED to happen for reviving them if they are flatlining?

Well, first you have your Igor open the skylights.....

dalesys
08-16-2013, 03:27 AM
Well, first you have your Igor open the skylights.....
Yeth, mathter!

sms001
08-16-2013, 09:59 AM
Yeth, mathter!

:eek:Gah! Where'd you come from? And stop that ridiculous lisp.

dalesys
08-16-2013, 01:56 PM
:eek:Gah! Where'd you come from? And stop that ridiculous lisp.
You rang-eth.

Tama
08-16-2013, 09:51 PM
In Fallout 3, Fawkes CAN actually die.

Dytchdoctir
08-17-2013, 12:52 AM
A jack rabbit is not a rabbit. It is a hare.

A marsh hare is not a hare. It is a rabbit.

wolfie
08-19-2013, 05:43 AM
Well, first you have your Igor open the skylights.....

Yeth, mathter!

I hope Dr. Frankenstein keeps his laboratory tidy. Otherwise, if someone from the DEA hears Igor talking about it, the place will get raided.:D

sms001
08-19-2013, 08:05 AM
A jack rabbit ...

I did not know that.

fireheart
08-21-2013, 02:19 PM
Fun fact: having a teaching degree also means that I will be qualified to work/run a family day care program. :D

Jester
08-21-2013, 06:21 PM
Beer fact: Guinness Stout has less calories and carbs than Budweiser, Miller Genuine Draft, Coors, Corona, Heineken, Red Stripe, Yuengling Lager, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, or Samuel Adams Boston Lager, and only slightly more calories and carbs than the average American light beer, such as Bud Light, Miller Light, or Coors Light.

Don't take my word for it. Compare the numbers to any beer you want. In a 12 ounce serving, Guinness Stout contains 126 calories and 9.9 grams of carbohydrates. Few non-light beers have less, and no major ones that I found in my brief search.

Guinness, the original light beer since 1759!

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-fc/guiness.gif :cheers:

EricKei
08-21-2013, 06:46 PM
Fun fact: having a teaching degree also means that I will be qualified to work/run a family day care program. :D
I would have thought military experience would be better for that sort of thing :angel: Ideally, a few years serving as a Drill Sergeant...

fireheart
08-21-2013, 11:07 PM
I would have thought military experience would be better for that sort of thing :angel: Ideally, a few years serving as a Drill Sergeant...

Oh har har >_>

No, this came about as a result of the convo I had with the regional bossman last night. When I mentioned what I was studying, he said that I should look into applying for a supervisory certificate, which would give me the power to manage a program (on a fill-in basis) with my current job (not necessarily at my current site though). Apparently studying that for 2 years allows me to run for that and I also have it for life. So I could run an after-school program from my house.

AnaKhouri
08-21-2013, 11:48 PM
Hello Kitty has a pet cat. Her name is Charmmy Kitty and she looks exactly like Hello Kitty, except she's a quadruped and wears no clothes.

It's pretty disturbing, actually.

Tama
08-21-2013, 11:50 PM
Maybe Hello Kitty works like Narnia where some of them are mere beasts and some are...well, like Hello Kitty.

pzychobitch
08-22-2013, 12:18 AM
Tupac used to do ballet.

pzychobitch
08-22-2013, 12:21 AM
Beer fact: Guinness Stout has less calories and carbs than Budweiser, Miller Genuine Draft, Coors, Corona, Heineken, Red Stripe, Yuengling Lager, Sierra Nevada Pale Ale, or Samuel Adams Boston Lager, and only slightly more calories and carbs than the average American light beer, such as Bud Light, Miller Light, or Coors Light.

Don't take my word for it. Compare the numbers to any beer you want. In a 12 ounce serving, Guinness Stout contains 126 calories and 9.9 grams of carbohydrates. Few non-light beers have less, and no major ones that I found in my brief search.

Guinness, the original light beer since 1759!

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-fc/guiness.gif :cheers:

Holy fucking shit. No wonder it's my favorite beer.

In Fallout 3, Fawkes CAN actually die.

OH my god, how?!

I've tried everything I've thought of short of console killing him.

sms001
08-22-2013, 01:22 AM
Hello Kitty has a pet cat....It's pretty disturbing, actually.

Not nearly as disturbing as Gub-gub sitting down to a full english in the Dolittle books. :devil:

Thanks for the HK trivia. I'll spring it on my SiL, who's a junkie (at 53!)

Tama
08-22-2013, 02:09 AM
pzychobitch -- Heres how I did it. I thought he couldn't die, so...yeah.

There's the mobile thingamajigger in the Broken Steel expansion, where you get onto it during the quest to destroy the Enclave. As you know there's shitloads of security guys and all sorts of robots.

I get to the very top where you are basically running around on its roof/landing pad/whateveritis.

Fawkes goes off with his gatling laser...and I get "Fawkes has died."

So it pretty much takes a whole lotta people and one very narrow set of circumstances to kill him.

Jester
08-22-2013, 02:17 AM
Holy fucking shit. No wonder it's my favorite beer.

Nope. It's not your favorite beer because it's low in calories and carbs.

It's your favorite beer because it tastes unlike any other, because it is superior to almost all others, and because, let's face it, it's the nectar of the gods.

Mikkel
08-22-2013, 10:16 AM
It's your favorite beer because it tastes unlike any other, because it is superior to almost all others, and because, let's face it, it's the nectar of the gods.
But the low calories is a nice perk ;).
I think there are more Guinness in my future.

Jester
08-22-2013, 11:35 AM
But the low calories is a nice perk.

Oh, certainly! I was just saying that that was not THE reason it was your favorite beer! :lol:

AnaKhouri
08-28-2013, 11:03 PM
Judge Dredd's last name is actually Dredd. His first name is Joseph.

Joe Dredd.

Jay 2K Winger
08-29-2013, 12:48 AM
Judge Dredd's last name is actually Dredd. His first name is Joseph.

Joe Dredd.

He is not named Joe.

He is named DREDD. His first name is JUDGE.

He is THE LAW.

Jester
08-29-2013, 11:31 PM
The majority of pumpkin beers are not made with pumpkin, but with pumpkin pie spices.

And, since I don't care for pumpkin or pumpkin pie, it is not all that surprising that the pumpkin beers that are made with actual pumpkin don't really apparel to me, but as I do like the spices used in the pie, I do like most of the other pumpkin beers.

Edited to Add: there is an exception to my above comments. My new favorite pumpkin beer, Cigar City's Great Gourd, is actually made with real pumpkin. And I love it. It's the first pumpkin beer I've ever had that was better than Shipyard's Pumpkinhead. And when I say "new favorite," I mean I just finished my first glass of it. It is also the first ever non-German beer that I've given a score of 9 (out of 10) or higher to. (I gave it a 9.) Since I started rating and taking notes on beer several years ago, the only other 3 beers I can remember giving a 9 or higher to were Weihenstephaner Korbinian dopplebock (10), Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Weizen (9.5), and Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier Urbock (9). Rarefied air, indeed.

dalesys
09-01-2013, 02:50 PM
When auditioned by the legendary Shadow Morton, thirteen/fourteen year old Janis Ian (Society's Child, At Seventeen, Jesse), was not impressed by his sitting behind a newspaper reading throughout her demo.

So she packed her guitar, lit his newspaper on fire, and left.:worship:

He had to run down the hall to sign her to a recording contract.:roll:

AnaKhouri
09-01-2013, 03:14 PM
95% of people have a narural immunity to Hansen's Disease, a.k.a. leprosy.

Tama
09-27-2013, 06:37 AM
Originally, Patrick Stewart did the speaking intro for The Nightmare Before Christmas. But apparently anyone who saw this version was too busy going "Hey, it's Captain Picard!" and nerding out to actually watch the movie! :lol:

ADeMartino
09-27-2013, 07:20 AM
The plastic tips at the end of shoelaces are called 'aglets'. Their true purpose is sinister.

Ah! Another Question fan! Awesome!

The Skipper's name was Jonas Grumby.

Mary Ann's last name is Summers.

The Professor's name was Roy Hinkley.

Mrs. Howell's name actually IS 'Lovey'. It is not a nickname.

Gilligan's first name was 'Willie'. Though this fact was never revealed in the show; the producers would have revealed it had the show gone another season.

Originally, Patrick Stewart did the speaking intro for The Nightmare Before Christmas. But apparently anyone who saw this version was too busy going "Hey, it's Captain Picard!" and nerding out to actually watch the movie! :lol:

I seem to recall him doing the voice-over for a Pontiac commercial. The Pontiac Montana, if I'm not mistaken.

El Pollo Guerrera
09-29-2013, 03:15 AM
Patrick Stewart's first on-screen kiss was in the movie "Lifeforce".

With Steve Railsback (best known as Charles Manson in "Helter Skelter".)

MoonCat
09-30-2013, 01:37 AM
Oh here's one:

In the Western world, the first restaurants were places you went to eat soup, which was considered a "restorative", which led to the name "restaurant."

sms001
09-30-2013, 09:46 AM
...eat soup, which was considered a "restorative", which led to the name "restaurant."

I did not know that! :)

And after all these years of working in them. Thanks, good one.

DaDairyDruid
09-30-2013, 11:47 AM
over 90 percent of all the zippers in the world are manufactured in 1 factory

MoonCat
10-01-2013, 01:39 AM
Originally, Patrick Stewart did the speaking intro for The Nightmare Before Christmas. But apparently anyone who saw this version was too busy going "Hey, it's Captain Picard!" and nerding out to actually watch the movie! :lol:

I have the soundtrack, and it's definitely his voice doing the intro and the end. I'm embarrassed to admit that the first time I saw the movie I thought his voice was familiar but I couldn't place it :o

Jay 2K Winger
10-01-2013, 03:51 AM
The ampersand (&) used to be pronounced "and per se and," and was commonly considered the 27th letter of the alphabet.

fireheart
10-01-2013, 12:27 PM
South Aussie Trivia Time!

-South Australia is the only state in Australia to be surrounded by all other states barring Tasmania (that is, my state shares borders with every other state)

-Despite the well-known fact that Australia itself was established as a penal colony, South Australia was one of the few states NOT to be started by prisoners. We were meant to be the ideal embodiment of British society. Key word: "meant." (the rest is Fratching-worthy)

-We are the only state to have a guided busway, known as an O-Bahn. This basically is a bus travelling on a railway track. It starts in the CBD, but once it hits a certain point, it switches over to a railway-esque track. Despite the increased signage and warnings that "THIS IS FOR BUSES ONLY" several cars still go on the track-and subsequently lose their oil pans.

-In the early 90's, my state was going to have a Multifunction Polis, aka "City of the Future" erected just north of the capital. Unfortunately funding for it fell through, but it still lives on and is now known as Mawson Lakes and is more of a "planned suburb" if anything, albeit surrounded by high-tech industry and research.

-The film December Boys was filmed on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. The film Picnic at Hanging Rock was also filmed in parts of South Australia, as was Priscilla Queen of the Desert, Gallipoli, Jaws (yes-Jaws) and Rabbit-Proof Fence (apparently some of the scenes were shot in a national park a few short kms from my house :eek:).

-My state invented the double-cut roll, the frog cake and the pie floater.

-While, not nearly as prominent, on the list of "BIG" things around Australia, we have the World's Biggest Rocking Horse. :D Apparently this was originally used as a lookout by the Country Fire Service. We also have the Big Lobster in Kingston.

-If you've ever travelled on an airplane or come across Beerenberg jam/honey/marmalade in hotels, congratulations, you've just eaten something from my state. :D In fact, you can even visit the farm and pick your own strawberries during particular seasons. :)

Kit-Ginevra
10-01-2013, 12:54 PM
There are as many people on Facebook in 2012 as the entire population of the world in 1804.

The flags of Haiti and Liechtenstein were identical and they didn't know it until they happened to meet at the 1936 Olympics (this vexallological fact is brought to you by Ferninand T.Flagg)

Whilst many American sports teams have transferred to a completely different city,only one British one has-the MK Dons(and got rather lambasted for doing so).

Because of the change of calendar and the change of New Year from March to January, the year 1752 only lasted for 9 1/2 months.

crazylegs
10-01-2013, 10:40 PM
Paramedics in the UK don't work under doctors orders, they're autonomous practitioner who decide what drugs to use when, within national guidelines. If a paramedic can justify stepping outside those guidelines they may do so.

fireheart
10-02-2013, 06:55 AM
You are actually allowed to transport live stock on Sydney harbour bridge between 12am and 5am, provided that you also give notice. Because of the location however, nobody has invoked this in the last 50 years.

ETA: To further clarify, this means that you can shepherd them across the bridge :lol:

wolfie
10-02-2013, 08:16 AM
There are 2 sub-national jurisdictions (state/province/territory/etc.) that border on 4 of the 5 Great Lakes: Ontario, which borders on all but Lake Michigan, and Michigan, which borders on all but Lake Ontario.

fireheart
10-06-2013, 11:18 AM
This song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FHNfWEkrL9I) was originally banned on radio in every state APART from South Australia. No idea why, although Cold Chisel do have partial origins in Adelaide.

Jester
10-06-2013, 02:32 PM
In the Western world, the first restaurants were places you went to eat soup, which was considered a "restorative", which led to the name "restaurant."

The very first restaurant in the world was in France.

The food was probably great, and the service snooty, even back then. :lol:


The oldest magic trick in the world is The Cups and Balls. If you've ever seen any variation of a routine where the performer made balls appear, disappear, and pass through a set of three cups, that's it!

The trick is a classic, and has such has been performed for thousands of years. The best practitioner of it that I've ever seen is a magician by the name of Gazzo, who has appeared the world over, performing not only as a street performer extraordinaire, but also with some of the most famous magicians in the world, including (but not limited to) Penn and Teller. I was lucky enough to arrive in Key West when he was still performing at our famous Sunset Celebration at Mallory Square, and over my first several years here, got to witness his act hundreds of times, and actually got to know Gazzo pretty well. This is not a shameless plug for him, as I haven't a clue where he is these days, but I felt it would be remiss of me to mention the oldest trick in magic and not tell about the greatest rendition of it I've ever seen.

And it would be a bit rude of me to speak so highly of his performance and not share it with you. Gazzo's no longer performing at Mallory Square, but I found a great video of his act there. Yes, it's long. Yes, it's I'm three parts. Yes, it's worth it. Watch all three parts--unless you're easily offended, in which case, you won't want to watch any of it. Because, in addition to is amazing ability as a magician and street performer, Gazzo is known for being very, very obnoxious. :lol:

Part 1 (http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=_F25K-ZbtUU&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D_F25K-ZbtUU). Part 2 (http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pDq-OVK6uLA). Part 3 (http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=FXClzvpKOfU).

Kit-Ginevra
10-06-2013, 09:20 PM
Some slightly out of season music...

Summer Nights was still No.1 in mid-November 1978 and hung around in the Top 40 over Christmas.

Meanwhile,in 1985,Do They Know It's Christmas? and Last Christmas were still in the Top 40 at the start of March...

Jester
10-06-2013, 11:27 PM
It's been brought up in other threads, partly by me and my annoyance at being called an Arizonian, when in fact I'm an Arizonan, but here is a list of what you call people from each state:

Alabama: Alabamian
Alaska: Alaskan
Arizona: Arizonan
Arkansas: Arkansan
California: Californian
Colorado: Coloradan
Connecticut: Connecticuter
Delaware: Delawarean
District of Columbia: Washingtonian
Florida: Floridian
Georgia: Georgian
Hawaii: Hawaiian
Idaho: Idahoan
Illinois: Illinoisan
Indiana: Indianian
Iowa: Iowan
Kansas: Kansan
Kentucky: Kentuckian
Louisiana: Louisianan
Maine: Mainer
Maryland: Marylander
Massachusetts: Massachusettsan
Michigan: Michiganian (though I've always heard Michigander, pretty much from people from Michigan.)
Minnesota: Minnesotan
Mississippi: Mississippian
Missouri: Missourian
Montana: Montanan
Nebraska: Nebraskan
Nevada: Nevadan
New Hampshire: New Hampshirite
New Jersey: New Jerseyan
New Mexico: New Mexican
New York: New Yorker
North Carolina: North Carolinian
North Dakota: North Dakotan
Ohio: Ohioan
Oklahoma: Oklahoman
Oregon: Oregonian
Pennsylvania: Pennsylvanian
Rhode Island: Rhode Islander
South Carolina: South Carolinian
South Dakota: South Dakotan
Tennessee: Tennessean
Texas: Texan
Utah: Utahn
Vermont: Vermontian
Virginia: Virginian
Washington: Washingtonian
West Virginia: West Virginian
Wisconsin: Wisconsinite
Wyoming: Wyomingite

This list does not include common nicknames, such as Cheesehead, Hoosier, Tar Heel, Mountaineer, Volunteer, or Buckeye. Or less known regional nicknames, such as Zonies from Arizona or Cracker from Florida.

SongsOfDragons
10-07-2013, 12:01 PM
On the subject of demonyms, or 'words that describe where a.person comes from'...

The technically grammatically correct demonym for Venus is Venereal, not Venusian, which is described as 'awkward'. However since the correct demonym has a meanig which may not be appropriate, astronomers and others who study Venus use the demonym 'Cytherean' which serves just as well, being the Latin translation for the island where Aphrodite came ashore after her birth - Kythera.

Which is a genuine island in the Aegean, I think, with a little island close by called Antikythera, whose claim to fame was the discovery of a sunken ship containing what appear to be large-scale Ancient Greek computer parts. Current mainstream thought is that the Antikythera Mechanism was a giant orrery, a working not-to-scale model of the solar system. (Or at least it was a few years ago ;) )

wolfie
10-07-2013, 12:39 PM
Regarding demonyms and islands in the Aegean, does this mean it's possible for a man to be a Lesbian?:devil:

Kit-Ginevra
10-07-2013, 02:18 PM
Or are they Lesbosians?

sms001
10-07-2013, 05:00 PM
Antikythera Mechanism was a giant orrery, a working not-to-scale model of the solar system....

Anyone interested in either astronomy or ancient artifacts should check this out, it's crazy cool.

Zellie Crescent
10-07-2013, 06:41 PM
Hawaii has it's own time zone, and early concept art showed that the main character Sora of Kingdom Hearts was suposed to be a "Sonic type" lion that had a chainsaw sword instead of being a human with a keyblade.

Teysa
10-08-2013, 12:54 AM
The mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska is a cat. Juneau is the only state capital in the U.S. you can't get to by car.

Jester
10-08-2013, 04:14 AM
One last quick note on denonyms...

You can see from my earlier list that someone from Utah is a Utahn. Odd, but not too weird.

What you probably didn't know is that someone from Tampa is a Tampon. I know, I know, you're sitting there thinking, "Noooo, it couldn't be...."

It is. :lol:

El Pollo Guerrera
10-08-2013, 05:43 AM
The mask that (the character) Michael Myers wore in the original "Halloween" was a William Shatner mask painted white, with the eyeholes made a little wider. They bought it for $1.98.

corwin02
10-08-2013, 08:26 AM
Let’s muse for a second that a man with a Master’s degree in Special Education who was working with special needs children found a better career in a more sordid field of employment (I am talking about Ron Jeremy).

corwin02
10-08-2013, 08:30 AM
And as a timewaster

155 useless trivia

http://dogman0.tripod.com/useless.html

sms001
10-08-2013, 10:05 AM
mayor of Talkeetna, Alaska is a cat.
Juneau ...you can't get to by car.

Well, honorary mayor.

And wow, I did not know that!
Not by just a little bit either, it's a 90 miles/144 klick pair of ferry rides in the final stretch.

Teysa
10-08-2013, 01:54 PM
Well yeah, true about the honorary part but it's still pretty cool.

fireheart
10-08-2013, 02:16 PM
Juneau is the only state capital in the U.S. you can't get to by car.

Speaking of locations you can't get to easily...

-There was a story about a family who lived in some weird area that had a 3-hour commute to send their kids to school. Can't remember where it was, but part of it included a ferry (and the parents both worked, so kids were not able to be school-of-the-aired)

-You cannot fly to Kangaroo Island in South Australia-ferry only. (I believe)

-In the Anangu Pitjanjara Yankulitjara (I know I've spelt that wrong!) lands between South Australia, Northern Territory and Western Australia, you cannot access those lands without a permit. Said permits are only granted to workers who will be working in the area.

dalesys
10-08-2013, 02:39 PM
One last quick note on denonyms...
Could you mean denynonyms?:p

(Demonyms)

AnaKhouri
10-08-2013, 03:00 PM
Roald Dahl, on his deathbed, sweetly told his family that he wasn't afraid but that he would miss them.

Then he seemed to go unconscious, so a nurse injected him with morphine and he said his real last words, 'Ow! Fuck!'

bhskittykatt
10-09-2013, 11:00 AM
-There was a story about a family who lived in some weird area that had a 3-hour commute to send their kids to school. Can't remember where it was, but part of it included a ferry (and the parents both worked, so kids were not able to be school-of-the-aired)


I don't think it's a 3-hour commute, but on Lummi Island they only have an elementary school, so middle and high school kids have to be ferried to the mainland.

In Point Roberts they only have an elementary school, too. Point Roberts is on the mainland, but is cut-off from the rest of the US by Boundary Bay. Middle and high school students going to school in Blaine have to cross the US/Canada border four times a day - twice in the morning and twice in the afternoon.

wolfie
10-13-2013, 01:00 PM
What you probably didn't know is that someone from Tampa is a Tampon. I know, I know, you're sitting there thinking, "Noooo, it couldn't be...."

Gotta ask you this - are people from Tampa stuck-up c***s?:devil:

It's been brought up in other threads, partly by me and my annoyance at being called an Arizonian, when in fact I'm an Arizonan, but here is a list of what you call people from each state:


Michigan: Michiganian (though I've always heard Michigander, pretty much from people from Michigan.)

Courtesy of one of my brother's friends: a woman from Michigan is a Michigoose. Why? Well, if a man from Michigan is a Michigander...

Sunshine
10-14-2013, 12:44 AM
King ranch in texas is bigger than rhode island

El Pollo Guerrera
10-15-2013, 05:44 AM
Remember this scene in "Taxi Driver"? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQkpes3dgzg)

Improvised. De Niro was getting into character, and director Scorsese told the cameraman to turn the camera on and watch.

(P.S. - that one guy in the cab who was watching his wife cheating on him? That was Scorsese.)

fireheart
10-15-2013, 08:19 AM
Remember this scene in "Taxi Driver"? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQkpes3dgzg)

Improvised. De Niro was getting into character, and director Scorsese told the cameraman to turn the camera on and watch.

(P.S. - that one guy in the cab who was watching his wife cheating on him? That was Scorsese.)

Speaking of moments that shouldn't have been in the film, at the beginning of knocked up, jay baruchels character was screaming on the roller coaster. Apparently that was a genuine shot of him being freaked out-he didn't like roller coasters, so the producer could only get one take.

AnaKhouri
10-17-2013, 12:46 AM
If you accidentally spill Dayquil into the burner on your stove, tell yourself you'll clean it up later, forget to do that, then turn on the burner, it kind of smells like you're making candy.

Jester
10-18-2013, 02:09 AM
Here's something y'all probably didn't know: at one time, in the late 1800s, Key West was the richest city per capita in the USA. Between the cigar factories, the shrimpers, the spongers, and the wreckers, and because it was a port city with access to both the US mainland and the Caribbean, this place was THE place.

wolfie
10-19-2013, 01:28 AM
The scene in Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home where the crew is talking to a woman about Alameda was unscripted - the off-screen types had to chase her down to get a release in order to use the footage in the movie.

This movie was originally released during the Cold War, and Soviet censors went over movies from the West with a fine-tooth comb. One line that had people rolling in the aisles (and may have cost a censor his job for leaving it in) was "The bureaucratic mentality is the one constant of the universe". Another line that got left in (and definitely DIDN'T cost a censor his job) was "You are entering a primitive and paranoid society" when the crew arrived in the 20th century U.S.

Washington DC used to be considered a hardship posting for foreign diplomats, because the city was built in a malarial swamp.

darkroxas45
10-19-2013, 07:54 AM
Austin Powers once French kissed a horse (sorry if i got that wrong I haven't seen that movie in forever ) if it helps my case Mike Myers' friends thought his dad was weird

dalesys
10-23-2013, 04:48 PM
Homonyms that are antonyms:

Raised - Razed

sms001
10-23-2013, 05:25 PM
Austin Powers once French kissed a horse

Well, I've had a horse's tongue in my mouth, but not vice versa. (Yes, there was a lot of spitting and cursing involved. :lol:)

Kit-Ginevra
10-23-2013, 08:15 PM
Words that have meanings that are complete opposites:

Cleave,Resigned

Kittish
10-24-2013, 01:29 AM
The tarantula hawk (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarantula_hawk) is apparently reckoned to have the second most painful sting of any insect.

Thankfully, they also seem to not be very aggressive, unlike some of the bees around here.

darkroxas45
10-24-2013, 08:54 AM
Well, I've had a horse's tongue in my mouth, but not vice versa. (Yes, there was a lot of spitting and cursing involved. :lol:)
I've had a cow's in mine, only it was boiled for 3 hours and tasty with mashed potatoes :angel:

KhirasHY
10-24-2013, 09:43 AM
The "sucking" noise that Anthony Hopkins used in The Silence of the Lambs was completely ad-libbed; the director liked it, so they kept it in the final cut.

Of all the words in the English language, the word "set" has the most definitions.

"Ough" can be pronounced in eight different ways. The following sentence contains them all: "A rough-coated, dough-faced ploughman strode through the streets of Scarborough, coughing and hiccoughing thoughtfully."

"Second string," meaning "replacement or backup," comes from the middle ages. An archer always carried a second string in case the one on his bow broke.

There are roughly 6,500 spoken languages in the world today. However, about 2,000 of those languages have fewer than 1,000 speakers. The most widely spoken language in the world is Mandarin Chinese. There are 885,000,000 people in China that speak that language.

Victor Hugo's Les Miserables contains one of the longest sentences in the French language - 823 words without a period

Jester
10-24-2013, 11:58 AM
Homonyms that are antonyms:

Raised - Razed

Or the same word that is an antonym to itself! This is one of my favorites:

Resigned. As in to re sign a contract, extending one's employment. Pronounced with the s sound.
Resigned. As in to walk away from a position, terminating one's employment. Pronounced with the z sound.

fireheart
10-24-2013, 12:34 PM
Austin Powers once French kissed a horse (sorry if i got that wrong I haven't seen that movie in forever ) if it helps my case Mike Myers' friends thought his dad was weird

He open-mouth kissed a horse.

If you watch the DVD they actually did several takes of that scene, each one with a different line from Mike. The lines were things like "he once had a bath with Basil" "kangaroos make me horny" "I can make my nipples wink" "From time to time my nipples will lactate".

Jay 2K Winger
10-24-2013, 05:51 PM
Or the same word that is an antonym to itself! This is one of my favorites:

Resigned. As in to re sign a contract, extending one's employment. Pronounced with the s sound.
Resigned. As in to walk away from a position, terminating one's employment. Pronounced with the z sound.

This very thing has led to so many arguments on one of the wrestling forums I frequent. It's gotten so we now spell "extending employment" as "re-signed" to avoid confusion.

KhirasHY
10-25-2013, 05:32 AM
The full list of injuries that would have been caused if the movie Home Alone had happened in real life:

1) Laceration to the forehead (shot from BB Gun)
2) Skull fracture leading to possible blindness or vision impairment, or death (Iron dropped on to face, assuming drop distance of 15 feet and an iron weight of 4 pounds)
3) Critical third degree burns, likely resulting in infection and contracture, limiting flexibility and movement in hand. Possibly will result in amputation of the hand (grabbing heated doorknob - if it glows red, it is approx. 751º Fahrenheit, nearly enough to cause his hand to burst into flames outright)
4) Necrosis of the skull (exposure to lit blowtorch on top of head for approx. 7 seconds) - bone tissue on the skull would likely be so damaged and rotted that it would require a transplant.
5) Multiple lacerations to feet, unlikely for any to be severe (walking barefoot on Christmas decorations)
6) Multiple fractures of facial bones, likely loss of teeth, probable unconsciousness. Possibility of death due to cranial injury (swinging paint cans to face, assuming paint cans are full and weighing approx. 10 pounds, with a 10 foot long rope, equaling a 2 kilo-newton hit to the face)
7) Concussion and possible head contusion (shovel to head/face)
8) Possibility of broken leg/hip/ribs (slipped down stairs due to ice)
9) Puncture wound of foot, possibility of tetanus (stepping on nail with bare foot)
10) Possible, though unlikely chance of heart attack (Tarantula placed on face resulting in severe panic attack)
11) Broken ribs, possible misc. other broken bones including spinal injury (fall from 2nd story when suspension line is cut)

KhirasHY
10-25-2013, 08:46 AM
Comedian history!

The "Dirty Old Man" George Carlin himself was once a major character on a children's TV show, as Mister Conductor.

Lewis Black was a playwright before becoming a comedian.

Ellen Degeneres was a door-to-door vacuum saleswoman before her career took off.

Jim Carrey was working as a Janitor, starting at 15 years old to support his family, before becoming nationally recognized on In Living Color.

Jon Stewart was a puppeteer, who put on shows for disabled children on most work days. Rumor has it that any puppet shown on the Daily Show is controlled by Stewart.

Zach Galifianakis used to be a bus boy in strip clubs, and had to clean up after men who...er...yeah. As a result, he despises strip clubs to this day.

Long before comedy and The Price is Right, Drew Carey worked as a waiter in Denny's. As a result, he reportedly never leaves anything under a $100 tip.

Kevin Hart was once a shoe salesman; by comparison, his Laugh At My Pain tour made over $15 million.

Gabriel Iglesias was a cell phone salesman at Wal-Mart before attending an open mic night, and being asked back.

Jerry Seinfeld had one of the toughest gigs: selling light bulbs to people...over the phone.

Whoopi Goldberg's former job was working as a make-up applicator in a mortuary, preparing corpses for funerals.

Bobcat Goldthwait was once approached by a woman in an airport, who told him "I don't want to insult you, but you look a lot like Bobcat Goldthwait." He's admitted that he was caught off guard so badly that he was unable to think of a response for several hours to that one.

Sam Kinison used to be an Evangelical preacher before losing his faith and turning to comedy, one of the reasons he was always so brutal towards religion.

Louis C.K. was originally born in Mexico, living there until he was 7. Spanish was his first language, and he still has Mexican citizenship.

Doug Benson was once a backup dancer in "Captain EO", Michael Jackson's Disneyland movie adventure.

bhskittykatt
10-29-2013, 07:18 PM
The Lady Washington has been featured as The Interceptor from Pirates of the Caribbean, the Enterprise at the beginning of Star Trek: Generation, as the Jolly Roger on the series Once Upon a Time, and as herself in Macklemore's "Can't Hold Us" music video. In the first three, she is shown with a steering wheel. You guys, the steering wheel is a lie! The Lady Washington is steered with a tiller (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiller), which is basically a really big pole that controls the rudder. The steering wheel is simply a prop that they pull out for the purpose of filming.

The Lady Washington has a sister ship: The Hawaiian Chieftain. The Hawaiian Chieftain actually does have a functional steering wheel. The two ships sail together, offering tours and mock sea battles. The quickest way to annoy one of The Hawaiian Chieftain's crew is to ask them "So, what movies has your ship been in?"

celticgrl
10-30-2013, 01:20 AM
In L. Frank Baum’s 1900 novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy’s slippers were silver. They were changed to “ruby” in order to take advantage of the Technicolor wow factor. Multiple sets were created for the film. A pair of the ruby slippers were stolen in 2005, but several others remain under lock and key.


The shabby coat that Frank Morgan’s Professor Marvel/The Wizard wore was a thrift store find. It was discovered later that it used to belong to Oz author, L. Frank Baum (his name was sewn into the garment). Baum’s widow and tailor confirmed the find.

KhirasHY
10-31-2013, 09:51 AM
Movie trivia edition!

In Dr. Strangelove, Peter Sellers was paid $1 million for his performances (just over half the budget). He was initially also going to play the role that went to Slim Pickens (of the man who rode the bomb), but was injured on set and could not do so.

Additionally, many of the Dr. Strangelove cast members were not aware the movie was a black comedy, and would not have agreed to be in the film had they known. Kubrick tricked them by doing "serious takes" of each scene, then doing a "goofy take" to lighten up spirits from the dark subject matter. When George C Scott saw the movie in complete form, and saw which takes were used, he stormed out of the theater and refused to speak of the movie ever again.

In order to properly look like a drugged up felon, Charlie Sheen stayed awake for 48 hours prior to filming his scenes in Ferris Bueller's Day Off. If only he'd waited a couple decades...

In the movie Alien, when the creature bursts out of John Hurt's chest/stomach, the other actors were not informed this was going to happen to catch their actual shocked reactions on film at the surprise.

While under contract as the James Bond actor, Pierce Brosnan was contractually prohibited from wearing a tuxedo in any other film.

The line-up scene in The Usual Suspects was originally meant to be serious, but things kept going wrong. Benicio del Toro kept farting during the scene, causing everyone to laugh repeatedly. Additionally, each actor completely ad libbed the line "Give me the keys you mother fucker", which only made everyone laugh harder. Benicio del Toro had the idea during the line-up to speak almost unintelligibly, and when the officer in charge says "In English, please", that is actually the director telling him to repeat the line. After filming, the take looked so natural, they decided to keep it.

The original, raw footage from Apocalypse Now included over 230 hours of footage, over 1,250,000 feet of film. Naturally, this was edited down slightly for the actual movie.

fireheart
10-31-2013, 01:44 PM
In L. Frank Baum’s 1900 novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Dorothy’s slippers were silver. They were changed to “ruby” in order to take advantage of the Technicolor wow factor. Multiple sets were created for the film. A pair of the ruby slippers were stolen in 2005, but several others remain under lock and key.


The shabby coat that Frank Morgan’s Professor Marvel/The Wizard wore was a thrift store find. It was discovered later that it used to belong to Oz author, L. Frank Baum (his name was sewn into the garment). Baum’s widow and tailor confirmed the find.

Apparently they gave the coat to his widow afterwards as well.

As for "method acting", in the original Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory film, the reactions of the cast when they walk into the "chocolate room" are genuine. They were forbidden to look upon the set to ensure that their reactions were priceless. Apparently the Oompa-Loompa reactions were the same.

Another "you don't know this moment's going to happen" part came during the scene when Wonka goes off at Charlie. He hadn't told him in advance what was going to happen and as a result, Charlie's reaction is genuine. He even kept his distance off-screen to enhance the effect.

On top of that, when the crew were setting up Wonka's office and cutting things in half, someone accidentally cut through a coffee cup that WASN'T being used in the film and didn't realise his mistake until coffee started spilling out of it. They also wanted to cut through the light bulb, but couldn't figure out a way to do this safely.

ETA: More Wizard of Oz Trivia!

-Apparently the snow used in the poppy scene was actually asbestos :eek:
-Judy Garland had to wear a very tight corset around her chest to indicate that she was younger...
-The Lion apparently could not eat regular food once his prosthetics were put on, so instead he'd eat lunch and have the prosthetics redone afterwards.
-In the scene where the witch leaves munchkinland, the smoke came before the actress could leave. When they reshot the scene however, the actress actually caught fire! (her makeup had copper in it)
-If you look closely at the scene where Dorothy sees Miss Gulch transform into a witch (during the tornado scene), her shoes end up changing into the red ones. The inside joke is that she's meant to be the Wicked Witch of the East (ie the one that they start singing "Ding dong the witch is dead" over)
-ALL of the Munchkin voices were dubbed, due to many of the actors not understanding English and/or singing well. The exceptions are hte girls that hand flowers to Dorothy. (admittedly, I do believe it is quite hard to dance en pointe and sing "the lullaby league" at the same time)

sms001
10-31-2013, 04:50 PM
celticgirl: wow, what an amazing coincidence. Life's bizarre.

fireheart, thanks. It's such an interesting movie in so many ways. Since you're apparently up on such things, is it true that Buddy Epsen had to quit the Tin Man role because of the make-up?

fireheart
11-01-2013, 02:52 AM
fireheart, thanks. It's such an interesting movie in so many ways. Since you're apparently up on such things, is it true that Buddy Epsen had to quit the Tin Man role because of the make-up?

Sort of. At the time, the makeup used was a powder instead of a paste. He accidentally inhaled some and it caused an allergic reaction, resulting in his hospitalisation. When they recast the role, it was changed to a paste and Jack Haley had no issues apart from accidentally getting some in his eye.

Tyg3rW01f
11-01-2013, 05:57 AM
http://travel.yahoo.com/ideas/fallen-soldier-213011521.html
Need I post more.
HOO-AH!
OO-RAH!
HUZZAH
HOYAH

KhirasHY
11-01-2013, 06:13 AM
MORE movie trivia!

In The Matrix: Reloaded, during the highway chase scene, the license plate on Trinity's car says DA203. If you look in Daniel 2:3, which says "he said to them, 'I have had a dream that troubles me and I want to know what it means.'" This is possibly making reference to Neo's dream, because he went to the oracle partly to figure out what his dream about Trinity meant. The biblical text is speaking about King Nebuchadnezzar's searching for the meaning of his dream. In Verse 3, the Nebuchadnezzar says, "I have dreamed a dream." In Verse 5, when asked to explain his dream, he says, "The thing is gone from me" (all this is from the classic King James Version). Near the end of the movie as the Nebuchadnezzar explodes as a result of the sentinels' bomb, Morpheus says "I have dreamed a dream, and now that dream has gone from me."

In X-Men 2, the entire computer list that Mystique is looking at on Stryker's computer are mutants from the Marvel universe: Guthrie (2) are brother and sister Sam and Paige, Cannonball and Husk, Keniucho Harada is The Silver Samurai; Garrison Kane is Kane from the Weapon X program; Remy LeBeau is Gambit; Eric Lansherr is Magneto, though it is supposed to be spelt Erik Lehnsherr; Artie Maddicks is Big Eyes; Jamie Madrox is Multiple Man; Xi'an Coy Mahn is Karma; Maximoff (2) are the brother and sister Pietro and Wanda, Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch of the Avengers, both are the children of Magneto; Kevin McTaggart is Proteus, Son of Moira McTaggart; Danielle Moonstar is Mirage, Psyche; Ororo Munroe is obviously Storm; Franklin Richards (You only see the "Lin Richards" ), the son of Reed Richards (Mr Fantastic) and the Invisible Woman (Sue Richards).

The movie Psycho is the first ever film which showed a toilet flush.

The slow motion sound effect used in the movie Dredd was inspired by a Justin Bieber song, slowed down by 800%.

In Saving Private Ryan, all the main actors besides Matt Damon were forced to undergo a brutal week long fitness camp for their roles as soldiers. Damon was exempt from it in order to generate genuine resentment towards him and his character.

Gene Wilder only accepted the role as Willy Wonka on the condition that during his entrance in the movie, he would be walking with a cane and a limp, then somersault and bounce back up. Asked why, Wilder said: “Because from that time on, no one will know if I’m lying or telling the truth.”

The scene in The Breakfast Club in which all the characters sit in a circle on the floor of the library and tell stories about why they were in detention was not scripted. Hughes told them all to ad lib.

In Liar Liar, when Fletcher literally beats himself up in the restroom, no sound effects were used; those are really the sounds of Jim Carrey’s head slamming into the urinal, floor and walls.

In A Few Good Men, Jack Nicholson repeated his famous courtroom monologue as Col. Jessep off-camera several times so director Rob Reiner could film the reactions of other actors from various angles. Nicholson’s memorable on-camera performance was filmed last, but according to Reiner and the other cast members, Nicholson gave it his all every take as if he was on camera.

Word use in The Big Lebowski: "Man" is said 147 times, "Dude" is used 161 times (160 spoken and once written), "fuck" and its derivatives are used 292 times, mention of The Dude's rug being pissed on are made 17 times, while "it really tied the room together" is said 5 times.

Also in The Big Lebowski (spoilers here for Miller's Crossing and Fargo as well), the movie concludes a three-film running gag by the Coen Brothers of killing Steve Buschemi's characters, but making sure his remains were smaller and smaller each time. In Miller's Crossing, Steve remained rather whole; in Fargo, only his leg and shredded chunks from the wood chipper are left. In Big Lebowski, he is finally reduced to ash and thrown all over Jeff Bridges. The directors joked that, if they did it a fourth time, he would simply have to be vaporized.

Tyg3rW01f
11-01-2013, 06:41 AM
the "two" town sets in Saving Private Ryan are actually the EXACT SAME SET... viewed in opposite directions!

Rohan and the village in 13th Warrior share the same main building.

Ed White, the late commander of Apollo 1, is the same astronaut who blew his hatch early in the Gemini/Mercury debacle.

dalesys
11-01-2013, 02:07 PM
Ed White, the late commander of Apollo 1...
Ooopsie!

Gus Grissom! Liberty Bell 7 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury-Redstone_4).

crazylegs
11-01-2013, 02:27 PM
A paramedic in the UK can give more IV morphine (20mg) per patient in a single dose, than a Dr can in Ukraine can give one patient per day (7mg).

KhirasHY
11-01-2013, 11:21 PM
If a goldfish is kept in low light with no sunlight contact, it will lose its pigment.

Mosquitos are attracted to the color blue twice as much as any other color.

Dolphins sleep with half their brain at a time, and with one eye closed.

The record for longest living reptile is held by a Mexican Beaded Lizard, 33 years and 11 months.

And since I'm a rat fanboy:

In two years, a single pairing of one male and one female rat can potentially have as many as one million descendants.

Rats can last longer without water than camels can.

A rat can swim for a very long time; rats have been spotted staying afloat for up to three days at a time.

Rats were once worshiped in ancient Egypt and the Mayan civilizations. Additionally, India's Temple of Deshnoke is sometimes called The Temple of Rats, with over 20,000 rats living there. Tradition states that killing one of those rats requires you to replace it with a golden rat statue. In ancient Rome, rats were considered good luck, while in China the rat is one of the twelve zodiac signs. The next Year of the Rat is January 25 2020 to February 11 2021.

Domesticated pet rats are considered among the most loyal and intelligent pets, and tend to be clean as well. Domestic rats will live between 2-4 years depending on diet, and most breeders will only sell them in pairs or triplets, as lone rats have low survival rates. A rat requires almost constant attention and touching to be healthy, so a pair of rats will keep each other alive.

Teysa
11-02-2013, 07:30 PM
Hmm, remind me not to wear blue when I go back to Alaska next summer.

KhirasHY
11-03-2013, 04:01 AM
Don't wear blue when you go to Alaska ne-*BANG*

*THUD*

...

...........

..........................

*drip*

protege
11-03-2013, 08:57 PM
Old Speckled Hen actually takes its name from the "Owld Speckled Un" which was a works hack used to transport workers. Apparently, the vehicle got a bit too close to the paint shop, leaving it with a distinctive speckled finish. The beer itself was first brewed in 1979, to commemorate 50 years of car manufacture at the Abingdon plant...having moved there from Oxford in '29. It's been tied to the marque ever since.

El Pollo Guerrera
11-04-2013, 04:43 AM
In the movie "Iron Man", the scene where the terrorists have Stark in the cave and are recording the video are in Farsi. So if you understood Farsi and watched that, you would have known the twist.

Same with "The Thing" (the 1982 film with Kurt Russell). The Norwegian guy at the very beginning was trying to warn the Americans. In Norwegian.

Lady Legira
11-04-2013, 11:06 PM
Ping Pong balls are the hardest thing to flush down a toilet.

crazylegs
11-05-2013, 08:39 AM
Ping Pong balls are the hardest thing to flush down a toilet.

Why do I now have the mental image of everyone who's reading this thread trying to flush ping pong balls to see how difficult it really is..? :p

fireheart
11-05-2013, 08:44 AM
Why do I now have the mental image of everyone who's reading this thread trying to flush ping pong balls to see how difficult it really is..? :p

Speaking of "things that should not be flushed down the toilet", one of the activities put up on my work's website was making tampon angels :eek:.

dalesys
11-05-2013, 12:06 PM
Ping Pong balls are the hardest thing to flush down a toilet.
Little brothers are.

...if it wasn't for his head ...

[/Cos]

Eisa
11-05-2013, 12:36 PM
Aurelio Voltaire was born in Cuba and immigrated to New Jersey as a child. From this song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Glm3o7MWg_k), you can tell how much he appreciated that move...

Speaking of Voltaire, his song "Brains" appeared in The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy and "Land of the Dead" appeared in Billy and Mandy's Big Boogey Adventure.

Ironclad Alibi
11-05-2013, 07:40 PM
The script for Every Which Way But Loose (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077523/) was written with Burt Reynolds in mind for the main character, Phylo Beddoe. The author gave it to Clint Eastwood to pass on to Burt Reynolds. After reading the script Clint Eastwood decided to keep it for himself.

Jester
11-06-2013, 11:17 AM
Little brothers are.

...if it wasn't for his head ...

[/Cos]

I am SO glad you weren't around in my childhood to give my older sister ideas....

mathnerd
11-06-2013, 11:15 PM
Little brothers are.

...if it wasn't for his head ...

[/Cos]

My oldest can confirm this.

Kit-Ginevra
11-06-2013, 11:41 PM
The song When Irish Eyes Are Smiling was written by a German who never set foot in Ireland.

Maltese football games do not have home or away.All the teams play together in the National Stadium.

And whilst we're in Malta,Maltese churches have two clocks in set at different times in order to confuse the Devil.

AnaKhouri
11-12-2013, 03:07 AM
Herman Melville's Moby Dick was partially based on the true story of the whaleship Essex, which was attacked and sunk by a whale.

(Nathaniel Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea is an amazing recounting of the tale of the Essex)

fireheart
11-12-2013, 10:18 AM
Leonard DiCaprio was kicked off the set of Romper Room at age 5 for being disruptive.

There was apparently an episode of Romper Room in Japan where the host (Miss Midori) asked the kid to name something beautiful using the sound "ki". He responded with "kintama!" (testicles). She then asked him for another word that was beautiful and he responded with apparently what was "beautiful testicles" in Japanese. The kid was subsequently replaced after the first act with a teddy bear. :lol:


SM: I know they changed a number of the characters to different genders, too x.x

Anyhoo...back to the facts:

Nintendo, the huge game company/console maker, got its start as a maker of playing cards...in the 1800's.


-The characters changed for the English version of Sailor Moon were: Zoycite (male to female), Fish eye (male to female-they had a scene of him/her ripping off his/her "dress/shirt" thingy to reveal his chest and they just passed it off as her being "flat chested" :D), some filler character for one of the funniest episodes in S/SuperS (the one where they visit a teahouse and Chibiusa pinches Usagi's foot) and Zirconia (female to male-this one screwed up the entire SuperS series because in the anime, Zirconia was an older version of Queen Nehelennia)

A defibrillator (the device used by medics to shock you during cardiac arrest) doesn't restart your heart, it stops it.

I'm sure Kerry Packer would LOVE to know about that....

Short version: Guy owned a TV channel in Aussieland, became known for establishing something to do with cricket, became slightly more famous for pulling a TV show off the air mid-show and had a heart attack at some point. After said heart attack, he requested that all ambulances in the state he resided in carry defib machines and agreed to partially fund it.
He himself actually got lucky-at the time of said heart attack, defib machines were not common on ambulances in Aussieland. He got lucky.
He died in 2005.

Speaking of the aforementioned TV show...


-There was a "special" in Aussieland called "Australia's Naughtiest Home Videos" which contained-among other things-animal sex and constant wardrobe malfunctions. (The show was actually a compilation of tapes sent in for Australia's Funniest Home videos that were too raunchy to be put on the show, but at the time they couldn't send the videos back)
Kerry Packer got wind of said "special" while having dinner at a friends house, rang up his channel and yelled out "Get that shit off the air!" The series was pulled about 35 minutes in to the 1-hour special and replaced with an episode of Cheers.

The aftermath?

-The host was fired/banned for life from the channel that made the show (he did return for some random show made by the channel in 2005 though O.o)
-The staff who were involved with said special were fired.
-In 2008 (3 years after his death), someone found a copy of the FULL episode and aired it 15 years and 51 weeks after the original airing. The guy who hosted it didn't return (he was offered the chance to, but didn't) and they made fun of the whole being cut early thing-although they had to tone down some of the jokes made by the original host.

If anyone's interested, I'll PM you a copy of the special. That said, it is VERY VERY VERY VERY NOT SAFE FOR WORK OR CHILDREN!!! (also the "M" rating that appears beforehand is a non-binding rating, it is roughly the equivalent of PG13)

Jester
11-12-2013, 11:17 AM
If anyone's interested, I'll PM you a copy of the special.

Yes, please. :D

Tesla
11-12-2013, 07:11 PM
Tungsten is the metal with the highest melting point.

The Cutty Sark was a sail powered ship that remained competitive with steam powered ships for several years. Additionally it has survived to present day.

One of the people behind Potter Puppet Pals is also the singer/songwriter of 'The Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny'.

Minnie is short for Minerva. [Minnie Mouse]

The first revolver produced in numbers had a folding trigger that only dropped from the frame into firing position when the hammer was cocked.

ADeMartino
11-12-2013, 10:58 PM
If you look carefully, you'll see Joe Walsh (yes, the ex-Eagle) in the movie THE BLUES BROTHERS. Hint: He's an inmate in the final scene.

According to the 'extended features' of the 25th anniversary release of the Blues Brothers, actor John Belushi actually wandered off-set to a random nearby home, knocked on the door, introduced himself, asked if he could make a sandwich, and then took a nap on the family's sofa.

cinema guy
11-15-2013, 10:38 PM
Nick Alkamade survived a 20000 feet fall from a burning Lancaster bomber during WW2. His parachute was damaged so he opted to jump out of a burning plane without a parachute rather than die in the fire. He crashed through pine trees and landing in a deep snow drift. He didn't break any bones.

He was captured but had a hard time convincing the Germans his story was true.

fireheart
11-15-2013, 11:44 PM
There's a time for swearing!

During the episode of Modern Family where Lily starts using the f-word over and over, she was never actually asked to say it and actually said "fudge" during filming. They simply dubbed it over with the censor bleep (from memory)

During the filming of "Meaning of Life", they actually said "...on the end of my SOCK" during the "Every Sperm is Sacred" sketch and dubbed "cock" in later. On top of that, the kids who were singing the song had no clue what they were actually singing about later :lol:

Kit-Ginevra
11-16-2013, 12:14 AM
Chyler Leigh from Grey's Anatomy,must have really wanted her big break at 15.Cast in the awful Kickboxing Academy,her love interest was...her real-life brother.

fireheart
11-16-2013, 11:47 AM
Among the versions of Monopoly are:

-Gayopoly (different gay hangouts from the US and the use of a triangular board)
-Anti-Monopoly (I've seen this one)
-"Vegas" monopoly (uses green felt board, wood panelling and gold/siilver pieces)
-Grateful Deadopoly.
-A South Australian version. Two actually. (These are typically sold as charity things)
-An AFL monopoly (no-really. You purchase bleachers as houses and stadiums as hotels :lol:)
-A hardware store chain version, a department store version.
-Two of the competing football clubs in my state each have their own monopoly boards. :lol:

Apparently in the UK, there is a drinking game where people follow the monopoly board and somehow get drunk. O.o

The original Monopoly tokens actually represented the rich and the working class. I'll let you guess which was which.

crazylegs
11-16-2013, 11:50 AM
Apparently in the UK, there is a drinking game where people follow the monopoly board and somehow get drunk. O.o

It's all explained here ;) http://monopolypubcrawl.org.uk/

fireheart
11-16-2013, 12:18 PM
It's all explained here ;) http://monopolypubcrawl.org.uk/

Oops, I did mean pub crawl. I has the dumb now.

sms001
11-16-2013, 12:48 PM
Nick Alkamade survived a 20000 feet fall....

That is just awesome.

fireheart
11-19-2013, 12:38 AM
In the 1930's, a man named Sir Edward Hayward became inspired by the Toronto Santa Claus parade and the Macy's Thanksgiving day parade and decided to start his own pageant.
That pageant? It's now known as the Adelaide Christmas Pageant or the Credit Union Christmas Pageant.

It originally started in 1933 with 8 floats and 3 bands. This year's pageant had over sixty floats, 11 dancing groups, fifteen bands, nine "walking floats"*, 1 DJ and 3 choirs**.

The pageant has a royal family: previously it consisted of the Pageant Queen and the princesses, over the last 4-5 years they've since included Pageant Kings and princes. These are people who work for the sponsor of the pageant and will travel to schools and places where people can't access the pageant easily. They have their own float and the King and queen will welcome Santa afterwards.

The pageant also has its own mascots-Nipper and Nimble, which are two giant rocking horses. The kids that ride them are usually 3-7 year-old girls who have parents working for the credit unions.

One year Santa passed out at the end of the pageant from the 40-degree heat. (they've since modified the santa suit so that he's kept cooler)

The Adelaide Gang Show (Scout/Guides theatrical performing group) will always participate in the pageant as they are sponsored by the credit union. Their roles will include clowns, "twirly" kids and then behind the scenes stuff.

*-a walking float is a group of people who will dress up or who will wear a "costume" of some kind, but they aren't being pulled along by a car or anything and aren't part of a "dance troupe" or "band." One example that springs to mind is a float called the "Naughty/Nice" machine, which was being pushed along by clowns. A non-example of a "walking float" is a group of precision team dancers.

**-the choirs tend to have their own floats. One float is the combined Adelaide Young Voices (girl/boy choir) that looks like a giant storybook and the singers are in one page of the "book". Very cute :D

fireheart
11-28-2013, 10:40 PM
In the video game Nancy Drew Danger By Design, there's a character called minette. In the Russian version, they had to modify the name. Why? Because apparently in Russia, "Minet" translates to fellatio....

wolfie
12-01-2013, 02:15 AM
Admiral Chester Nimitz (WW2) and presidents Andrew Jackson and Bill Clinton were born after their respective fathers died (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posthumous_birth).