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bhskittykatt
10-01-2013, 04:37 AM
This is from Hubby's workplace. Hubby is a security guard at a gated community.

Sucky Guest (SG) came up to the gate. SG was the boyfriend of a woman who lived in the community, though apparently not a good one since he wasn't on her permanent guest list and she was calling him in daily. (You can call in a guest to be put on the temporary daily list , and you can put frequent guests on the permanent list [ie family, homecare workers, etc].)

SG came up to the gate. He wasn't on the list for that day, because his girlfriend had merely forgotten to call him in. Hubs denied him entry and told him he would have to call the girlfriend and ask her to call the gatehouse to approve his entry. SG did not have his cell phone. Hubs, in his generosity, allowed him the use of the phone in the guardhouse.

SG: "I don't have her number. Can you look it up for me?"
Hubs: "Technically yes, but I can't give it to you."
SG: "Aww, c'mon!"

They went back and forth for a bit, with SG getting more and more agitated.

Then SG said the most threatening sentence ever: </sarcasm>

SG: "[I]Well, if you won't do anything for me, I'm going to leave!"

We've all heard that sentence before in retail settings and such, but just think about it in this context for a bit. I'll wait for the stupidity to sink in...

Hubs said there was nothing he could do. SG dramatically threw up his hands and exclaimed "Fine! I'm leaving!" and left.

sms001
10-01-2013, 10:59 AM
SG: "Well, if you won't do anything for me, I'm going to leave!"


Yes. That's how it works. :lol:

For once a SC who (however unwittingly) gets it right.

AccountingDrone
10-01-2013, 01:53 PM
How the hell does a "boyfriend" not have his girlfriends phone number? Even if not in a phone, scribbled on paper in the wallet?:confused:

icmedia
10-01-2013, 02:18 PM
I'm thinking of this movie:


http://ia.media-imdb.com/images/M/MV5BMzkxMzcxNzE3M15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMDM4MjUyMQ@@._ V1_SY317_CR1,0,214,317_.jpg
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0097790/

Sandiercy
10-01-2013, 04:54 PM
It is funny how "customers" seem to think that we might possibly care that they are leaving/buying their product somewhere else.

ADeMartino
10-01-2013, 04:58 PM
How the hell does a "boyfriend" not have his girlfriends phone number? Even if not in a phone, scribbled on paper in the wallet?:confused:

I can forgive this; I know a LOT of people who only keep track of phone numbers by adding the contact to their list via a dialed-in call. For several months, I had no idea what MY home phone was because it had been ages since I'd dialed it (I'd always call her cell, or if I had to dial the house, dial it from contacts).


SG: "Well, if you won't do anything for me, I'm going to leave!"


"Hey, you catch on pretty quick. Have a nice day, buh-BYEEEEEEEEE!"

taxguykarl
10-01-2013, 06:00 PM
I can forgive this; I know a LOT of people who only keep track of phone numbers by adding the contact to their list via a dialed-in call.Many of my tax custys have to look up their own phone numbers for just that reason.

MoonCat
10-02-2013, 12:08 AM
Yes, he was depriving you of the stellar glory of his company....

Ack, I can't even say that without laughing...

Jay 2K Winger
10-02-2013, 12:16 AM
"I'm going to leave!"
"Don't let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya."

Sheldonrs
10-02-2013, 01:44 AM
How the hell does a "boyfriend" not have his girlfriends phone number? Even if not in a phone, scribbled on paper in the wallet?:confused:

He forgot to print out the ad from Craigslist.

:-)

Sapphire Silk
10-05-2013, 02:35 PM
How the hell does a "boyfriend" not have his girlfriends phone number? Even if not in a phone, scribbled on paper in the wallet?:confused:

A pyschologist friend of mine uses phone numbers to assess mental status. He had one kid tell him his home phone number was "7."

He didn't understand when asked for the rest of the numbers. It was just 7.

as in 7 on his speed dial, that his mother set up for him (this was a teenager). He had no idea what his actual phone number was.

And honestly, beyond my own number, and my best friend's number, I don't know a lot of numbers either. Smartphones are a wonderful thing.

MadMike
10-06-2013, 09:56 PM
And honestly, beyond my own number, and my best friend's number, I don't know a lot of numbers either. Smartphones are a wonderful thing.

I used to be great at remembering phone numbers. I could tell you every phone number I've had in the last 25 years. But as soon as cell phones started having address books, I kind of got lazy. I couldn't tell you my best friend's number, and I've known her for many years. But it's in my phone.

sms001
10-07-2013, 10:57 AM
I used to be great at remembering phone numbers.

Ditto all that. Besides the contacts list though, there's the fact that a large proportion of people I call are necessarily ten digit numbers. Most friends I had in my youth were seven, and probably the bulk of those were only four, really, as we lived in the same prefix area. Ten is a lot harder to memorize than four (for me. :o)

Mandatory xkcd:

http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/cell_number.png

Grendus
10-08-2013, 06:49 PM
Ditto all that. Besides the contacts list though, there's the fact that a large proportion of people I call are necessarily ten digit numbers. Most friends I had in my youth were seven, and probably the bulk of those were only four, really, as we lived in the same prefix area. Ten is a lot harder to memorize than four (for me. :o)



There's a very solid reason why phone numbers are a 3 digit area code and a 7 digit phone number. On average, humans have 7 places in short term memory. Your average person can remember a 7 digit phone number. They'll start getting confused at 8. They figured a 3 digit area code wouldn't be problematic since that's usually the same for 90% of the phone numbers a person would need to know anyways.

ADeMartino
10-09-2013, 01:16 AM
I wish they'd go back to the old alphanumeric phone numbers, which were very easy to remember.

Slipping into 'old coot' mode here - and this is mostly for the benefit of the younger members of the forum, though today it is essentially just trivia.

Decades ago, phone numbers used to have a format that started with a two-letter prefix like MI, ES, etc. They'd often be remembered (and spoken) as MIchigan or ESsex, and the two-letter prefix would correspond to numbers (MI, for example, would be 64. and ES would be 37). So you'd have numbers like MI-5211 or ES-5369 (Spoken MIchigan 5211 or ESsex 5369).

Rural areas would often have simplified numbers with only a three-digit suffix. Witness Junior Samples' "BR-549" on the old HEE HAW teevee show.

Long-distance calls would usually be placed with the operator's assistance, prior to the advent of actual area codes.

This, incidentally, was the original reason you have alpha characters on your phone's keypad, though at the time, phones had rotary dials. While most phone numbers eventually became purely numeric, the alphanumeric format actually did continue into the 1980s, even as phone numbers gained a 7th digit due to the introduction of 'direct dialing', area codes, and touch-tone.

Incidentally, MI-5211 was semi-famous because of a television show in the 1950s. Bonus points if anyone can tell me which show.

dalesys
10-09-2013, 01:21 AM
I wish they'd go back to the old alphanumeric phone numbers...
Tommy Two-Five!

ADeMartino
10-09-2013, 01:36 AM
Tommy Two-Five!

"Jenny's" number might start with TOmmy! TOmmy7-5309 or TOMmy-5309!!

ADeMartino
10-11-2013, 11:03 AM
Well, nobody accepted my trivia question, so I'll go ahead and answer before the thread gets closed.

MI-5211 was the phone number of Police HQ in the old TV show DRAGNET. Yessir, Sgt. Joe Friday, but in black and white, and long before Bill Gannon (Harry Morgan) appeared. The show had a reputation for technical accuracy, and 'dummy' phone numbers on TV back then usually started KL or some other combination corresponding to 55, so there's a very good chance that "MIchigan-5211 was indeed the REAL phone number of the LAPD.

raudf
10-11-2013, 11:06 PM
It's really sad that I have my old Monkey Ward's repair phone number memorized. We were known as A&E Signature Service at the end, and when that got bought out by Sears, they changed it to A&E Factory Service.. with the same number

Docmayhem
10-13-2013, 11:12 PM
I wish they'd go back to the old alphanumeric phone numbers, which were very easy to remember.

In my continuing quest to become a crotchety old man... I remember that as well.

In fact, since I lived in a suburb of NYC (think high population density) I remember people in Baldwin, NY complaining that they ran out of "BA" numbers and that the new "TN" numbers were hard to remember.

To this day, most of the numbers in Baldwin start with "223" (Baldwin 3) or "868" (TN8).

There's even a taxi company by the railroad station where the sign is old enough to have the phone number as "BA3-####" (Don't want to get them flooded with calls)

BookstoreEscapee
10-13-2013, 11:41 PM
Back when I used to read the Babysitters Club books, their phone numbers all started with KL5...which is, of course, 555.

I know my cell phone number but not my landline, since I never use it and don't give it out. I have it in my cell phone under "Me" for the rare occasions I need it. I remember my parents' landline because it's been the same number since we moved into the house when I was two. I don't know either of their cell phones off the top of my head. I also remember the number of Store1, which I left in 2004 (but not Store2, which I left in 2006). I have to stop and think about my current work phone number, and at work I keep a list of the extensions of the people I'm most likely to call taped to my phone. Everyone else I look up in Outlook.

ADeMartino
10-14-2013, 02:42 PM
I think there was a certain charm in the old phone-exchange names, too. Or maybe it's just because I'm rapidly becoming an old fart. Somewhere in a closet I have an ancient rotary-dial desk phone, with a sticker on the bottom claiming it had been 'remanufactured' in 1972. So I'm guessing the thing might be considerably older. In the center of the dial, it still has the last phone number to which it was assigned - with a CYpress exhange. The phone is built like a tank, and I know it still works (though dialing into a automated voice menu is kind of a pain). I also have a GTE 'Princess'-style handset somewhere - also with a rotary dial. In bright, eye-searing PINK.

Of course, I gave up having a house phone several years ago. My cell is overall more convenient and I have it with me most of the time anyway. I guess this is what they call 'progress', huh?

mhkohne
10-14-2013, 10:26 PM
I think there was a certain charm in the old phone-exchange names, too.

I'm just gonna leave this link here
https://www.sparkfun.com/categories/244