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EvilEmpryss
01-18-2014, 10:35 PM
Listen, woman, your son looks to be at least ten years old so there is NO reason for him to be in the ladies room at a small movie theater. I could forgive that, seeing as I'm a mom myself and I know we can be over protective, but when I walk into the stall he just vacated and find an unflushed toilet with urine all over the seat, we're going to have words.

You can get your undies in a knot when you see me questioning your son about where you are, but when I explain the situation to you don't tell me that it must be because he was scared of all the women in the restroom! Maybe if you cut those apron strings he might man up a bit and not turn into a pee sprinkler in the presence of the opposite sex. That, or, I don't know, let him use the men's room like a big boy?

Frankly, I don't care why he lacks the basic bathroom manners that most four year olds have mastered, SEND HIM BACK IN THERE TO CLEAN UP HIS MESS!

It was so nice to finally catch one of those disgusting seat pissers and call them on their crappy manners!

Kittykat
01-18-2014, 10:53 PM
Yeah, I'd have gone straight for management.

EvilEmpryss
01-18-2014, 10:55 PM
It would have been too late to catch the culprit if I went for a manager... besides, I had to pee. :p

Kittykat
01-18-2014, 10:57 PM
LOL, true. This is why there really needs to be age limits on bathrooms. Once your kid is in double digits, they need to be going to the bathroom by themselves. I know I've stood in the doorways (Not looking in) to the men's room before when my nephews were going to the bathroom, I'm close enough so if they yell I can hear, and I'd go right in if someone touched them, believe me.

NecessaryCatharsis
01-18-2014, 11:08 PM
My son (5) still goes into the womens room with me if he can't reach the taps on the sink by himself. It makes me a little uncomfortable, and I think it's time for him to be in the mens. At 5. I can't imagine what goes on in some parents minds that its ok at 10.

At the gym my son takes swim lessons at there is a sign on the womens changeroom doors. 'No men, no boys over 2 years old, no fathers, no brothers' There is a single stall family bathroom/changeroom in between the mens and womens changerooms, but they still had multiple instances of fathers taking little girls into the the ladies to change, sending brothers (8+ years) into the ladies to collect a sister getting changed, women taking their boys (10+ years) into the ladies to change them etc. For some reason there has never been a problem with men thinking it's okay to take their 10 year old daughters into the mens to get changed. Hmmm.

EvilEmpryss
01-18-2014, 11:54 PM
I could understand if the boy was handicapped or developmentally disabled; that's the *only* reason a boy his age should be in the ladies room. This boy was neither, and I think he was actually closer to 12 but I'm earring on the conservative side. The theater was a nice place, too, not some creepy dark place in a bad neighborhood or anything. And the men's room wasn't half as busy as the women's room, so him going into a woman's stall took space that only women could use. There were multiple levels of inconsiderate behavior on this one.

Pixilated
01-19-2014, 01:06 AM
This is why those "family" restrooms are such a blessing, and why every store doesn't have them puzzles me no end. They allow parents and children of differing genders to go in there without either freaking out the people already in there, or having the kid's mind blown. :)

As to this particular case, I have no kids, so am not sure why mom felt it necessary for the boy to be in the women's room. The mess, however, is a whole different matter. Regardless of his age, somebody should've cleaned that up.

EvilEmpryss
01-19-2014, 01:44 AM
Regardless of his age, somebody should've cleaned that up.
And the happy ending to this story is that the somebody who cleaned it up was the one who made the mess. :D

cleorose
01-19-2014, 02:08 AM
I have three boys my only break seems to be when dad takes them in the boys room. Once they hit about 5 they started getting sent into the boys room. Yes I wait outside (perverts are everywhere) but I am determined to try to get them to grow up semi normal. And not having a mom in the stall when they go to the bathroom seems a bit much. And I am very over protective lol. I thought hovering by the bathroom door was a bit much.

otakuneko
01-19-2014, 02:14 AM
For some reason there has never been a problem with men thinking it's okay to take their 10 year old daughters into the mens to get changed. Hmmm.

Because, of course, only men can be creepers, so the women's room is "safe territory." :rolleyes:

wolfie
01-19-2014, 02:42 AM
A bit O/T, but you've probably seen (in smaller establishments) the washrooms that are clearly designed to be used by one person at a time (outer door locks, no inner door, just a toilet and washbasin in a single small room). Why are washrooms of that nature designated as to gender? After all, they're only supposed to have one person in them at a time, so does it really matter if the previous user was of the opposite gender? I've never seen an aircraft lavatory that was designated as to gender, so there is precedent for a "one person at a time" facility.

Monterey Jack
01-19-2014, 03:06 AM
Listen, woman, your son looks to be at least ten years old so there is NO reason for him to be in the ladies room at a small movie theater. I could forgive that, seeing as I'm a mom myself and I know we can be over protective, but when I walk into the stall he just vacated and find an unflushed toilet with urine all over the seat, we're going to have words.

Jesus...when I was ten, I had the common sense to flip up the damn toilet seat if I was going to take a piss. Sadly, it seems like most men of any age lose their damn minds when relieving themselves in a public restroom...at least 65% of the time when I use the restroom at work, I find a seat covered in piss. :rant: Do these people do the same thing at home? No, of course not, because then they'd have to clean up after themselves. :rolleyes:

EricKei
01-19-2014, 01:05 PM
This is why those "family" restrooms are such a blessing, and why every store doesn't have them puzzles me no end. They allow parents and children of differing genders to go in there without either freaking out the people already in there, or having the kid's mind blown. :)I've only ever heard/seen the term used to describe (gender-segregated) restrooms with changing tables built in to the wall o_O Different areas, different definitions, I suppose ;)

cindybubbles
01-19-2014, 06:47 PM
My mom and I took my two nephews to see a movie, and we all had to use the bathroom afterwards. My eldest nephew, I think, was around 8 or 9 at the time, and, because he has autism, I worried about sending him to the men's room.

Well, we didn't have much of a choice, because the line for the ladies' room was too slow and too long. My nephew protested, saying, "I should go to the men's room!"

So he and I broke away from the line, and headed to the men's room. I waited by the door while he went inside.

When my mom told my sister about this incident, she told us that standing by the door is what she does when she takes the boys to the washroom!

cindybubbles
01-19-2014, 06:49 PM
I've never seen an aircraft lavatory that was designated as to gender, so there is precedent for a "one person at a time" facility.

I have, on Korean Airlines. No designated "men's" room, but definitely a designated "ladies'" room!

telecom_goddess
01-20-2014, 06:23 PM
I'm grateful that I had daughters. No gender issues, and it was rare that the fathers in question would take them in to the bathroom, if ever. So I just graduated from being in the stall with them to being outside the stall :D My middle daughter was entertaining as hell in the public restroom because she would sing the entire time she was in there :roll::roll:

greensinestro
01-21-2014, 04:38 PM
My daughter goes into the ladies room by herself and she has Down's Syndrome. I took her with me into the men's room until she was about five, and even by then, I was never comfortable with it. At times, if she takes too long, I try to find someone female to check on her as I do not wish to wind up on the sex offender list simply because I checked up on her. Usually, she does this by herself.

As for my son, I stand guard nearby being as someone said earlier, the pervs are lurking.

EvilEmpryss
01-22-2014, 01:42 AM
I think the primary reason guys don't take their daughters into the men's room is the urinals: you don't have women flashing their junk in the open in the ladies' room because everything is don in the stalls.

And I've snagged men coming out of or going in to the men's room to check on my son and I've done the same for men asking about little girls in the ladies' room. Most people seem to be happy enough to help a parent out by checking on a kid. :)

fireheart
01-22-2014, 04:52 AM
I've only ever heard/seen the term used to describe (gender-segregated) restrooms with changing tables built in to the wall o_O Different areas, different definitions, I suppose ;)

My semi-local pool has a whole bank of these. Basically they resemble a bunch of handicapped toilet stalls stuck together, with a space in the middle for parents to change their kids diaper (whether it's actual change or from diaper to swim diaper) Some mothers/aunts/cousins/grandparents I've seen do take their daughters in with them to the ladies room though. As for the family stalls, they're also fenced off to contain their runaround kidlet.

My more local pool puts the "parent of opposite gender in bathroom/change room" cap at age 6.

Seshat
01-22-2014, 10:15 AM
In the parts of Aussieland I've been, here's the 'family room' variations I'm aware of:

- combined handicapped/family toilet: larger stall, with room for a wheelchair & carer (for handicapped) or parents (for family). Entrance separate from but near the other toilet entrances.

- 'baby care room': toilet stall (or stalls), baby change tables, couch or couches for feeding. Usually the breastfeeding couches are separated from the toilet facilities by at least a half-wall, if not completely separated. Intended for parents of both genders, and the couches can be used by bottle feeding parents not just breastfeeders. Child-genitalia can be exposed, feeding breasts can be exposed, adult crotches should not be exposed outside the stalls.
Usually only really large shopping centres have this much available, but I'm sure it's appreciated.

- Smaller family toilets: just the change table and stalls and enough space for the family.

- Sometimes there's a more public, but still 'out of the main path' set of seats for child-feeding; a kind of nook accessed by the same corridor as the toilet corridor. Probably where the public phones used to be, when they were still profitable. ;)