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Jay 2K Winger
02-09-2014, 07:06 PM
We've seen posts here about folks getting calls from people claiming to be from "Windows" or "Microsoft," saying they're getting reports of error messages from the recipient's computer. It's a well-documented (at this point) scam in which the callers/scammers attempt to get you to click to a website or similar so they can hack your computer for fraudulent purposes.

Welp, Mom got a call from one of them earlier today. Literally as I was heading out the door to go to work, I overhear her reaction:

"Well, I don't know how you can be getting error messages from my system, since I don't have a Windows computer. I have an Apple computer. You're wasting your time. Goodbye."

Click.

I'm so proud of her.

otakuneko
02-09-2014, 07:53 PM
Dammit why is it I never get to have fun with these guys? :(

MoonCat
02-09-2014, 09:39 PM
Sometimes I wonder if the calls I don't pick up, that never leave a message, might be something like this. If I don't recognize the number, I don't answer. Maybe I should, sometime. Could be fun!

Jay 2K Winger
02-09-2014, 11:37 PM
Mom was wondering how the scammers got our number, since it's unlisted.

Dad and I had to explain to her that just because we're unlisted doesn't mean that they can't dial our number. "Basically, this guy is given a list of numbers and told to call as many as he can by the end of the day. He'll just cross us off and move on to the next number."

raudf
02-10-2014, 11:24 PM
I think it's a robo-dialer that they use to assign a range of numbers like say, 606-0842 to 867-5309 and it will dial literally every number in that range. Doesn't matter if your number is unlisted if that's what it does.

Note, though, my understanding of robo-dialers is very basic. I'm just assuming this is what they do.

thatcrazyredhead
02-10-2014, 11:44 PM
Way to go, Mom!

I got one the other day that started out with a recording saying they were from "card services" and wanted to talk to me about lowering the interest rate on my "credit card." I know this is a scam, because in the fourteen years I've had credit cards, none of them has ever once offered to do anything nice for me. Also, when they actually do call, they identify themselves as calling from whichever bank the card if with (Chase, etc). So I waited on the line until I got a real person and said, "What part of 'National Do Not Call List' do you not understand?"

They hung up. :)

Deserted
02-11-2014, 01:33 AM
I think it's a robo-dialer that they use to assign a range of numbers like say, 606-0842 to 867-5309 and it will dial literally every number in that range. Doesn't matter if your number is unlisted if that's what it does.

Note, though, my understanding of robo-dialers is very basic. I'm just assuming this is what they do.

You've got it spot on. (For legit call centers, the dialer program has a blacklist of numbers to not call.)

(Old-time hackers called this war dialing. Instead of trying to get a human, the dialer was listening for a modem's connect signal. Those it found would be noted in a file for later human perusal. See this entry at the Jargon File (http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/W/war-dialer.html).)

Mr Hero
02-11-2014, 06:39 AM
If I get a call this is how I would like to respond.

"I just have Steam on my Windows. Nothing threatening."

An Haddock
02-11-2014, 07:04 PM
Yeah, I posted about this a couple of weeks ago.

I tell them I'm with the FBI. They can't hang up fast enough.

dalesys
02-11-2014, 07:46 PM
I tell them I'm with the FBI. They can't hang up fast enough.
It's the green teeth (http://youtu.be/952h-AJ3Bcg) that clinch it...

the lawsmeister
02-12-2014, 12:56 AM
I had my third call from them yesterday. Its getting annoying, not because they've called but every time they call I'm either heading out or putting the kids to bed and I don't have time to stay on the phone and mess with them :(

skeptic53
02-12-2014, 02:50 AM
Sometimes I wonder if the calls I don't pick up, that never leave a message, might be something like this. If I don't recognize the number, I don't answer. Maybe I should, sometime. Could be fun!
Or not... there is a "one ring" scam http://finance.yahoo.com/news/one-ring-scam-cost-money-200000992.html that can cost you money

Argus
02-12-2014, 04:06 AM
Or not... there is a "one ring" scam http://finance.yahoo.com/news/one-ring-scam-cost-money-200000992.html that can cost you money

Only if you call them back.

MadMike
02-12-2014, 05:51 AM
Only if you call them back.

...which I would never do. If they couldn't be bothered to leave a message, or even wait for me to answer, then it couldn't have been important.

wolfie
02-14-2014, 07:10 AM
I tell them I'm with the FBI. They can't hang up fast enough.

Bad move - that's impersonating a police officer. On the other hand, if you tell them you're with "The Agency" or "The Bureau", or throw together a combination of letters ("I'm with the MIB", or "I'm with the TLA"), you're not identifying yourself as being a member of an ACTUAL government department.:D

Note: for those not "in the know", the groups I mentioned are the Men In Black, and the Three Letter Acronym.:angel:

raudf
02-14-2014, 01:00 PM
Or not... there is a "one ring" scam that can cost you money

This be one of the reasons that if I don't recognize a number, I don't answer it. If it doesn't leave a message, I don't call it back, but that is reduced by topic of call vs the number. If it's a "Call Us back at XXX-XXX-XXXX," with no reason, forget it. If it's a "This is your bank calling about blah, blah, please call us back at XXX-XXX-XXXX," it will depend on whether or not the number left in the message is one I know is my bank. Otherwise, sod that. I'm tired of scammers.

Also, I had a 900 block put on my landline.

Mr Hero
02-14-2014, 02:24 PM
I've gotten calls from my bank. They have
always identified the name of the bank they are with. Still a good idea to cross reference the phone number with the actual contact info on the website.

DGoddessChardonnay
02-14-2014, 10:19 PM
I've gotten calls from my bank. They have
always identified the name of the bank they are with. Still a good idea to cross reference the phone number with the actual contact info on the website.

Run a google search on the phone number is a good way to verify if they are a legitimate company or one that's being reported to various consumer websites as scam artists.

Or check with one of those sites, such as:

800 Notes (http://www.800notes.com)

WhoCallsMe (http://www.whocallsme.com)

CallerComplaints.com (http://www.callercomplaints.com)

You'll be surprised by what you can uncover. If they are constantly calling, file a report with the FCC
File Complaint | FCC.gov (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&ved=0CCcQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.fcc.gov%2Fcomplaints&ei=TqT-UrqaFMLr2QW914CgBw&usg=AFQjCNG5_TX9ihJLV8MY0FC2xyf8gFq3Uw&sig2=VvXYgjd-vPBmM9djoQdksg&bvm=bv.61535280,d.b2I)

MadMike
02-15-2014, 01:27 AM
Bad move - that's impersonating a police officer.

I really doubt that a scammer is going to call the cops on you.

Argabarga
02-15-2014, 05:32 PM
Yeah, first thing they're gonna have to do is

1. Admit they called you
2. Admit who they said they were when the called you

And that puts THEM in the wrong.

Total non-risk, even if the letter of the law says otherwise.


Though I do wonder sometimes how the 21st century proliferation of scam artists using automated dialers following in the heels of the 90s' proliferation of cold call telemarketing is just speeding the end of the old land-line system because people are just that tired of what might be 80% or better of their calls being unwanted and/or criminal.

wolfie
02-15-2014, 07:16 PM
Of course, there's the possibility of a 3rd party (is the NSA running all phone calls through an automated search for keywords?) hearing the conversation, and THEY might turn you in for impersonating a cop.

Argabarga
02-15-2014, 07:52 PM
They've got much more important things to do than worry about someone claiming to be a cop in casual conversation for the expressed purpose of getting a nuisance-maker to leave them alone.

Trust me

Can't name the last person who actually was investigated, let alone prosecuted, let alone jailed for doing that.

It's a risk so infinitesimally small it borders on non-existent. And that's all I'll say before I fratch it.

protege
02-15-2014, 09:58 PM
So far, I've received a few...

* The "Windows" scam. I do tech support for a living. My computers are always up to date regarding drivers and antivirus updates. Trust me, I know what I'm doing. Plus, I know for a fact, that Micro$haft does *not* call users to inform them of problems.

*The copier scam. Seriously? You don't need my copier's serial number. If that's the first thing you ask for, I automatically know that you're going to try and send me shitty office supplies, and then attempt to bill me for them. As much as I'd love to get a free gift (thank you USPS for that!), I don't want to trash my copier.

*The various "card services" ones. Again, seriously? You don't mention which "credit card account" you're calling about, and I'm supposed to give you my info? Sorry, but fuck that. Last time I checked, my credit card companies do *not* cold-call their customers. If they do call, they always identify themselves and don't sound like a damn robot.

Not only do I do tech support, but I do visit message boards and other places about such scams. Trust me, I'm onto you long before you call me :p

HawaiianShirts
02-16-2014, 11:53 PM
Haven't had the "Windows Error" calls yet, but I've had lots of the "Card Services" calls. I have a persona just for such calls--Lev the Angry Russian Immigrant. I just adopt my best fake Russian accent (which is pretty pathetic, actually), complain about the "stupid Americans" I have to live and work with, and give the scammers just enough information to keep them on the line thinking that, eventually, they'll get what they want from me. Most of them don't last long, though.

"I'm with the TLA"
...the Three Letter Acronym.

Laughed so hard I woke up the baby. (Fortunately, she is now giggling as well, but for other reasons.) I'm definitely going to use that one.

TheSHAD0W
02-17-2014, 08:56 PM
I finally got one of them calling me. I kept him on the phone for seven minutes "waiting for the computer to boot up", "the home screen is up but I can't use it yet, it's still loading programs", "yes I pressed the button with 4 boxes on the left and R, nothing happened", "no, there's no button on the bottom left"... :devil:

Jay 2K Winger
02-17-2014, 09:20 PM
Thanks to folks who told me about the "one ring" scammers, because I think I got hit with a variant of it this past weekend.

I went to the movies, as I usually do on Saturdays, and after leaving the theater, checked my phone to see I'd received a text message. I ignored it pretty straight away, since it wasn't from any number I recognized, and it had a part in the text which was just [XXXXXXXXXX] (as in that was literally what filled some space, square bracket on, bunch of X's, square bracket off) but it also said "Card blocked due to fraud" and included a phone number.

Suspicious, I checked the area code on the number, which was for somewhere in Orlando, FL. A reverse phone lookup didn't return any name. Since my bank card still works, and that's the only card I've used in years, I naturally assumed it was just a scammer, hoping I'd call the number provided so they could... I dunno, run up charges on my phone number or something.

I figured if my card had been blocked, I'd have gotten an email from my bank about it. My bank is diligent about strange behavior on my card. When I made some big clothing purchases before my trip to Mexico, I got a couple of email alerts from the bank about them.

Mr Hero
02-17-2014, 11:35 PM
Or they wanted the card number itself.

Someone needs to make a parody of "one ring" scams that somehow involve the One Ring

pzychobitch
02-19-2014, 03:22 AM
Or they wanted the card number itself.

Someone needs to make a parody of "one ring" scams that somehow involve the One Ring

One Ring to rule them all...

Anyone else have lord of the rings in mind here?

dalesys
02-19-2014, 03:38 AM
Anyone else have lord of the rings in mind here?
Bored of the Rings (http://www.solargeneral.com/library/bored-of-the-rings-henry-n-beard-douglas-c-kenney.pdf)...
Frito, a Boggie from The Sty...
The Nine Riders on their farting pigs...
Goodgulf the Wizard...

Shalom
02-19-2014, 03:58 AM
Bored of the Rings (http://www.solargeneral.com/library/bored-of-the-rings-henry-n-beard-douglas-c-kenney.pdf)....

And don't forget the parody of Appendix A (http://users.stargate.net/~drushel/b_app_a.html).

These are the names of the Kings of Twodor: Barbisol the Buck-Toothed, Beltelephon the Senile, Nabisco the Incompetent, Melonhed, Cementrúk, Aileron the Inverted, Analog, Oscarmayer, Rómancandil I, Túrnabout, Anteater I, Saládati, Tarantella, Éarwax I, Carryout, Hormóndocil the Eunuch. Hormóndocil was the first childless King, and was succeeded by his brother, Anteater II the Gluttonous. Nembutal, Cholera, Rómancandil II, Volksicar, Edselcar, Castrati the Unsavoury. He was the second childless King, and was succeeded by his brother’s son, Dilidali. Hormóndocil II, Minnihaha, Telegraf, Tóronto, Telegenic Lumbago, Nembutal II, Calamiti, Underhand, Éarwax II. He and his children perished in the Spotted Plague, and was succeeded by his cousin, Chlorinol. Chloride, Chlorox, Chloroplast the Green, who died mysteriously. Here the line of the Kings was interrupted, with the disappearance of Chloroplast’s son, Æroplane, and the Stewardship of Twodor began, until an heir of Æroplane should return.

These are the names of the Ranger Chieftains in Northern Exile at Ribroast: Æroplane, Ærodróme, Ærodyne, Æroflot, Arglebargle I, Arrowroot I, Arrowfrog, Arglebargle II, Arrowshirt I, Arrolflynn, Ardi-ar-ar, Arminávi, Arlidávison, Arrowhed, Arrowshirt II, Arrowroot II, True King of Twodor and Heir of Barbisol, restored.

wolfie
02-19-2014, 04:35 AM
Whoever came up with those names must have spent too much time partying with Tim Benzedrino.:D

the lawsmeister
02-21-2014, 04:40 AM
I had my third call from them yesterday. Its getting annoying, not because they've called but every time they call I'm either heading out or putting the kids to bed and I don't have time to stay on the phone and mess with them :(

They called me again last night and I finally had time to mess with them. I told the caller she sounded sweet and asked what time she got off work so we could meet up. She hung up on me.
Yes I know that isn't cool and is really creepy (and I have never treated a legitimate telemarketer like that regardless of what they are selling) but if you're going to actively and consciously try to defraud me then all bets are off and I'm going to be a total prick to you.

Golden Phoenix
02-21-2014, 07:47 AM
At our previous address we got one of these calls. I got bored of him and switched to speaking Welsh in the middle of a sentence.

A load of repetitions of "I don't understand you" and ""you're a liar" in welsh and i got bored again and hung up.

He called back!

Repeat.

He called back, with his manager there! The manager kept saying "I know you speak English, you were doing it before"

I switched back to English, told them off for bothering me and hung up, they never called back.

Kept me entertained for a while though.

Geek King
02-21-2014, 02:45 PM
My personal favorite for those guys is BSing that I'm doing what they ask, then when they tell me to go to a website (don't by the way, its virus-laden with nasty ones), I keep telling them I'm getting 501 errors, or a message saying that the hosting company is blocking this website for reported illegal activities. Its really entertaining hearing their keyboards go mad trying to figure out what's going on. :D

Deserted
02-21-2014, 09:58 PM
At our previous address we got one of these calls. I got bored of him and switched to speaking Welsh in the middle of a sentence.

A load of repetitions of "I don't understand you" and ""you're a liar" in welsh and i got bored again and hung up.

He called back!

Repeat.

He called back, with his manager there! The manager kept saying "I know you speak English, you were doing it before"

I switched back to English, told them off for bothering me and hung up, they never called back.

Kept me entertained for a while though.

Should've gone back-n-forth. Maybe make it sound like you barely understand english yourself. :) I know just enough spanish to do that. I'd do it using some cheesy movie-mexican voice. If they happened to know spanish, I'd tell them "I no speak the español," still in the same accent. :D

Captain Trips
02-28-2014, 07:28 PM
My personal favorite for those guys is BSing that I'm doing what they ask, then when they tell me to go to a website (don't by the way, its virus-laden with nasty ones), I keep telling them I'm getting 501 errors, or a message saying that the hosting company is blocking this website for reported illegal activities. Its really entertaining hearing their keyboards go mad trying to figure out what's going on. :D

I, being a tech, have been wondering what to do when they eventually call me. I think I may borrow some of this. Maybe I'll throw in a 404. (Or better yet, a "419 error, I think it may be from a server in Nigeria...")

NecessaryCatharsis
02-28-2014, 07:45 PM
I just keep agreeing with them. 'Yes I know, last time I checked windows said I had 645 errors. Yes that is a lot. No, I don't think they need fixed, it is still running fine, when it stops running I'll call you. No, I am happy to keep my errors for now, thanks.' Most of them hang up but one was really persistent, so I finally asked what the goal of the conversation was. After much go around about the 'errors' I found out why Microsoft cares if I have errors.

I am pleased to announce I can tell you the real reason they are calling: to prevent people from buying pirated copies of windows off the internet after their original operating system fails.

When I agreed never to do that they finally stopped calling me. (And I'm no expert but even if you wipe your virus laden computer do you not still 'own' one copy of windows you can put back on it?)

Geek King
02-28-2014, 08:39 PM
When I agreed never to do that they finally stopped calling me. (And I'm no expert but even if you wipe your virus laden computer do you not still 'own' one copy of windows you can put back on it?)

Sort of. You actually own a license to use a particular version of Microsoft Windows Operating System. Your license is that string of letters and numbers that comes with the software CD, or pasted on your PC somewhere.

But yes, the phone people are full of road apples.

lordlundar
03-02-2014, 04:19 AM
I am pleased to announce I can tell you the real reason they are calling: to prevent people from buying pirated copies of windows off the internet after their original operating system fails.

Oh that reminds me of when I worked Software retail. Microsoft just launched their "Genuine Product" system (essentially a periodic verification check if you're online). For three months straight we had people coming,telling the same story about how their copy of Windows locked them out. Every time they were asked where they got it, they responded they downloaded it off the net, and we promptly replied with essentially "you got busted and you're going to have to get a genuine copy now". with absolutely no sympathy.

I kept hearing that there were people hit with false positives with that system and I'm sure there were, but I never met one.:lol:

MadMike
03-02-2014, 05:55 AM
I kept hearing that there were people hit with false positives with that system and I'm sure there were, but I never met one.:lol:

I have. It happened to a friend, who always calls me with any computer-related issues. In her case, all I had to do was re-enter the product key on the label that was attached to her machine, and she was good to go. Not sure what to make of that. :confused:

Aethian
03-02-2014, 06:10 AM
I've had it happen to me when I updated Frankie. Had to call in and go through a 15 min phone call to put in a huge string of characters.

protege
03-02-2014, 03:32 PM
I kept hearing that there were people hit with false positives with that system and I'm sure there were, but I never met one.:lol:

We have one machine at work that is throwing out "this is not genuine" on a daily basis. Even if I enter the code, it still doesn't work. Computer works fine otherwise. Of course, I'm not exactly in a hurry to fix it--Windows XP support from Micro$haft ends in April.

Kagato
03-03-2014, 01:13 AM
It is a security feature of the windows software, whenever you make a major upgrade to your computer such as changing your motherboard/cpu/etc, it will "dial home" to make sure the copy is still legit.

Jay 2K Winger
03-03-2014, 01:29 AM
Hmm. I'm getting random calls now from Minneapolis. The first time was around 3am. I was awake, fortunately for them, playing video games. I stared at my phone in confusion, didn't recognize the number, and answered it.

J2K: "Hello?"
Them: "Hi, I'm [name] from [something] Security. Am I speaking to Tom?"
J2K: "No."
Them: "Oh. My apologies. Good night."

I didn't realize where they were located, but the following day, my phone was on silent because I'd been at the movies, and I see a missed call, from the same area code. A quick Google search later told me the 617 area code was in Minneapolis. They'd even left a voice message.

Yup, it was for Tom Wotzisname again. Which I don't understand because my voicemail message very clearly states "Hi, you've reached the mailbox for Jay Winger, please leave your name and number and I'll get back to you as soon as I can. Thank you."

While Jay Winger is not the name I give (I use my real name), it does not sound at all like Tom Wotzisname. So I don't understand why they bothered to leave a message for him.

I did not call them back. I just deleted the message. If I get another call for Tom Wotzisname again, I may call them up, just to let them know "Hey, I don't know who this guy you've been trying to reach is, but you've been calling my personal cell phone. Take me off your list."

Deserted
03-03-2014, 04:35 AM
While Jay Winger is not the name I give (I use my real name), it does not sound at all like Tom Wotzisname. So I don't understand why they bothered to leave a message for him.

I'd guess it's a bill collector. I've had a series of them calling me for some time, asking for "James or John Something". Sorry, no James here, no John, this isn't the Something household, etc.

The most recent call, I spoke with the agent. James or John Something apparently live in my apartment complex. I'm not entirely sure how in the hell they have my number to give out, and I sure as hell don't know them. (~400 units in this complex.)

Racket_Man
03-03-2014, 05:47 AM
I kept hearing that there were people hit with false positives with that system and I'm sure there were, but I never met one.:lol:

happened to me once with a PC that had Windows Vista on it. happened 3 or 4 years ago.

the machine had apparently just gotten a Windows update and it started throwing up "Illegal copy" errors for some reason. basically shut down the machine. I had to call Micro$oft and go through a bunch of steps with me going into stuff I had NO idea of, reading off strings of letters and numbers to the guy on the phone. They had me enter a "new" validation serial number (different from the one on the side of my machine) to re-up my copy of Vista.

An Haddock
03-03-2014, 05:27 PM
I'd guess it's a bill collector. I've had a series of them calling me for some time, asking for "James or John Something". Sorry, no James here, no John, this isn't the Something household, etc.

The most recent call, I spoke with the agent. James or John Something apparently live in my apartment complex. I'm not entirely sure how in the hell they have my number to give out, and I sure as hell don't know them. (~400 units in this complex.)


They might get the street address but not the apartment number and just do a reverse-address search and call the first person they find. Once in a while we get a call for the woman who lives upstairs from our business. It's just the two of us with the same street address but with a 1st floor and 2nd floor. I just tell them she's not at this number but if I got into it, I'm thinking it's someone trying to sell her something. So whoever is trying to get her probably just punched the address into Google or whitepages.com and our phone number is the one that came up.

As for Jay Winger, I agree it's probably a bill collector - I'm sure people give false names and info all the time so they probably just ignore voice mail messages, assuming that whoever left it is trying to duck them with a fake name.

I used to keep a list of solicitor phone numbers in hopes that they might call back after being told not to, but over time I stopped keeping track. With all these Windows scammers and now a new inundation of people trying to sell me credit card processing, I might have to start doing it again.

Jay 2K Winger
03-03-2014, 06:48 PM
I did consider that the calls for Tom Wotzisname were bill collectors, but the voicemail that was left for him seemed to suggest it was more like some kind of security company trying to alert him about something.

In which case I really hope they do get in touch with him. But if the calls for Tom keep coming, then I'll load up to let them have it with both barrels for harassing me.

MadMike
03-03-2014, 11:41 PM
Yup, it was for Tom Wotzisname again. Which I don't understand because my voicemail message very clearly states "Hi, you've reached the mailbox for Jay Winger, please leave your name and number and I'll get back to you as soon as I can. Thank you."


Simply stated, people don't listen. I had a similar problem when I was in my first apartment. I had all kinds of people calling my number by mistake and leaving messages for people who weren't me. So I changed my greeting to something like, "Hi this is Mike. I'm not available to take your call, but if you leave a message I'll get back to you." I still got messages that went something like, "Hi, (name that's not mine), this is so-and-so. Call me back as soon as you get this."

I even tried changing it to something like, "Hi, I'm not available. If you're calling for Mike, leave me a message and I'll get back to you. If you're calling for someone other than Mike, then you have the wrong number. Sorry." Problem solved, right? If only... :hairpull:

Argabarga
03-03-2014, 11:58 PM
My machine also started throwing that annoying "NOT GENUINE!" error, right after a combo firefox/adobe update. As long as it goes away when I click the box, I'm in no hurry to fix it, this machine's due for the scrap heap pretty soon anyway.

I can feel the pain of persistent bill collectors who don't listen/believe the deadbeat they're looking for is NOT you.

I had one a few years back when I lived at a rental property who called looking for "Chris" and I'd flat out tell them "Sorry, I'm not him, he must've been the previous tenant, this is an apartment". And without exception, the lady would say "Oh, well, where is he now?"

Really? REALLY?

I DON'T KNOW HIM! I'm just guessing he's the guy who used to live here, stop calling me, you won't get YOUR money from ME. And then, the very next day, we got to do it all again. It only stopped when I left, for all I know, they're bugging the guy who lives there now about where "Chris" moved off to.


Then there was the time craigslist mislisted a doctor's office as my number. And some of these people were adamant, ADAMANT that they had reached the appointments line, and not some guy's apartment because they got the number OFF THE INTERNET! and the internet can't be wrong!!!! For the ones that were gracious and apologetic, I gave them the real number which was written down closeby. For the ones insisting I was punkin' them, they got a dial tone.


THere's a lone company cell at work that we only use for the installed apps that let us use GPS and search the ticket/tow database by license plate, see if the cars we tow in have anything outstanding on them.

It is NOT used to call anyone, and it's number, whatever it is, is unlisted. It's strictly app only.

About 6 months back, it started getting calls from a number in Colorado. Naturally, we didn't answer them and this thing doesn't have a voicemail set up. It reached the point that 4 times or more a day someone from that area code was trying to call us, and just didn't get the hint.

The eventually gave up.

And peace returned, for a week.

Now it's getting multiple calls daily from some number in Florida..... again, no idea who it is because if I answer it, they might just flag it as "good" and call even more.

Jay 2K Winger
03-04-2014, 12:35 AM
I'm sure there have probably been other attempted calls for Tom Wotzisname (or others) that I don't know about.

Those calls, however, probably come during the week when I'm at work... which means my cell phone is shut off and in my car. (No personal electronic devices allowed inside The Client.) So any calls would go straight to voicemail.

However, since they don't leave them, they presumably therefore just hang up and flag the number as "bad."

Shalom
03-04-2014, 06:27 PM
Years ago my phone number was one digit off the VA Hospital in Buffalo. That was fun.

For a while, my answering machine started "Hi, you have reached the ******** residence. If you want the VA hospital, please hang up, put on your glasses, and dial 716-834-xxxx..."

(ETA: I just googled my old number, and apparently it's now a dentist's office number. I wonder how many calls THEY get for the VA.)

Sheldonrs
03-04-2014, 07:17 PM
Years ago my phone number was one digit off the VA Hospital in Buffalo. That was fun.

For a while, my answering machine started "Hi, you have reached the ******** residence. If you want the VA hospital, please hang up, put on your glasses, and dial 716-834-xxxx..."

(ETA: I just googled my old number, and apparently it's now a dentist's office number. I wonder how many calls THEY get for the VA.)

When I live in San Jose, CA, my phone# was one digit off of American Airlines.
I got calls at all hours. The nice people got told they had the wrong number. Anyone that got nasty got me taking their "reservation" info. :devil:

Ironclad Alibi
03-04-2014, 07:39 PM
Our phone number is one digit away from a local crisis hotline. Fortunately we don't get calls for them very often.

MadMike
03-04-2014, 07:53 PM
Our phone number is one digit away from a local crisis hotline. Fortunately we don't get calls for them very often.
Mine was a digit off from the local rape crisis center. I didn't get that many calls for that either, but the few that I did... not fun.

mjr
03-04-2014, 10:21 PM
I had a phone number once where in the last four numbers, the first two and last two were transposed from the local bowling center. I'd get an occasional call, but not bad, all in all.

Ironclad Alibi
03-05-2014, 08:44 PM
I just got off the phone with a "Windows Support" scammer. I kept him on the phone for many minutes, going to his web site (safeme.us) and downloading his program (but not running it). He kept wanting me to click on open file, but Firefox did not give me that option. He then sent me to the support.me web site and tried to get me to give him remote access to my computer, which I found out is what the a1.exe program was for. I declined, told I was getting bored and that I knew it was a scam. Amid his protestations I hung up on him.

retro
03-06-2014, 12:22 PM
Our phone number is one digit away from a local crisis hotline. Fortunately we don't get calls for them very often.

A friend of mine had a number one digit different from the benefits office and she was fed up with people calling up demanding to know where their giro (read: welfare cheque) was. Some were really abusive too and weren't prepared to listen to her lies about it being a wrong number.

Then a friend was at her place and picked up the phone. When the caller started demanding to know where their cheque was, he replied calmly: "How did you get this number Sir? No. No. This number definitely isn't listed. I ask again. How did you get this number? We are a government service who are unlisted in any phone books. How did you get this number? Okay, we've traced the call. We'll be sending someone to your address now. Good day, Sir."

The icing on the cake was he called the number back five minutes later, hid the number and just said "Get out. Get out now. Get out while you still can!"

drjonah
03-06-2014, 02:48 PM
A long time ago, my parents number was two digits different then the Hilton hotel. Normally not a big deal unless a hotel customer called information for the hotel number (this was back when you always got an operator at 411). Well most of the operators would give the customer the number for the hotel as XXX - SIXTY FORTY but a lot of customers would misunderstand it as XXX - SIXTEEN FORTY and call my parents house at all hours of the day and night.

My parents were stubborn and refused to change their number so my dad called the Hilton and told them to change their number or my parents would start taking reservations. Needless to say the calls stopped very soon after that.

Gizmo
03-06-2014, 05:14 PM
My landline is the same as the local Citizens Advice if you don't dial the area code - which for them is a premium/0845 number. Only had the landline a few weeks and had a couple of confused but strangely intelligent callers...

otakuneko
03-06-2014, 10:19 PM
I do so want to lure one of those Windows scammers into one of my VMs. I've got 2k and 2k3 Server VMs... I could load one up with fake goodies for him to steal, or firewall off the VM and string the guy along while all connection attempts fail, or even fire up a VM loaded with something like PCLinuxOS or ReactOS (http://www.reactos.org/) and confuse the shit out of him...

but alas, I don't think I'll ever get the opportunity. :(

Captain Trips
03-08-2014, 02:15 AM
I'm still waiting for my scam call. I think I'll jist give them my IP address. 127.0.0.1. Wonder if they'll get it.

ADoyle90815
03-10-2014, 07:31 PM
Years ago my phone number was one digit off the VA Hospital in Buffalo. That was fun.

For a while, my answering machine started "Hi, you have reached the ******** residence. If you want the VA hospital, please hang up, put on your glasses, and dial 716-834-xxxx..."

(ETA: I just googled my old number, and apparently it's now a dentist's office number. I wonder how many calls THEY get for the VA.)

The landline is one digit off from the harbor patrol's security division, as I live in a port city. Once when someone didn't believe that they called a residence, I said that I'm a couple of miles inland, and the closest body of water is the swimming pool next door. For a while, my voicemail greeting included "If you want the harbor patrol, the number is (actual number)." It's been a while since anyone has called the landline trying to reach the harbor patrol. I've never even considered messing with telemarkters by saying they've reached the harbor patrol as it could be considered impersonating law enforcement.

As for those scammers from Microsoft, I told them I had an Apple computer, which was my way of getting rid of them. On my cellphone, I ignore numbers from area codes I don't recognize, so those scammers eventually try another number. It was actually my cell phone where I got the one ring scam, but there's no way I was going to fall for that since I don't return calls to numbers I don't recognize, especially if it's an area code I'm not familiar with.

wolfie
03-10-2014, 09:52 PM
It was actually my cell phone where I got the one ring scam, but there's no way I was going to fall for that

Would that be where someone is trying to trick the nasty hobbitses into returning his precious?:lol:

Ophbalance
03-11-2014, 04:29 PM
I'm on call number 2, but they keep hanging up when I start laughing.

Jay 2K Winger
03-11-2014, 05:48 PM
The calls for Tom Wotzisname continue. Last night, as I turned my cell phone back on after work, I found another voicemail waiting for me. I knew it was going to be another call for Tom, so I held off on listening to it, intending to do so today, then give the security company in question a call and let them know that I am not Tom Wotzisname.

Turns out I didn't need to. On my way to work today, I got a call from that number in Minneapolis that's been calling for Tom.

Them: "Hi, this is [name] from Security. Can I speak to Tom?"
J2K: "There is no Tom at this number."
Them: "Oh. Okay, thank you." (click)

I double-checked the voicemail when I got to work, and these calls are apparently in regards to some alarm on a fire panel at some retail store that Tom's connected to. Which just makes the fact that they continually try to call me-- and get my voicemail, which explicitly identifies me as [B]not being named Tom Wotzisname-- and leave these messages for him.

I think I'll call them back anyway, getting the number off the voicemail again, and politely but firmly ask them to stop calling me.

EDIT TO ADD: Called them up. Didn't give my name, just said that they'd been calling my cell trying to reach Tom Wotzisname in regards to a fire panel alarm and leaving voicemail messages for him. They apologized, asked for my cell number, and said they'd update their records.

Incidentally, it would appear my incoming voicemail message isn't clear enough. I had thought it said "Hi, you've reached the voicemail of Jay Winger, etc." when it turns out it goes, "Hi, you've reached Jay's voicemail, etc." so there is room for doubt. I'll have to update that later.

icmedia
03-12-2014, 05:45 PM
I just had one of these guys call me up at work yesterday, tell me to go to their website (a VPN site that would give them access to my machine), then ask me what I saw on my screen.

I started reading the the guy the malware.com description of their website (which I had Googled), which uses clear language like "scam," and "illegal."

The guy called me a bastard, and hung up.

Plague*Star
03-13-2014, 02:59 AM
The landline is one digit off from the harbor patrol's security division, I've never even considered messing with telemarketers by saying they've reached the harbor patrol as it could be considered impersonating law enforcement.

Nonsense! NO reason at all you can't have a message saying, "This is one digit off, from the harbor patrol's security division. If people assume the number belongs to the hot-tempered Spanish-Russian investigator, Juan Dichidoff, that's *their* problem.
P*S