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LillFilly
02-24-2014, 02:17 AM
This was told to me at a gun show I went to this weekend. AKA, Female doesn't know what kind of gun she has.

I was looking for .38 ammo for a 1930 Smith & Wesson Revolver. This revolver takes half-moon/full moon clips to hold the bullets in the chamber, because of its design (no rims on today's bullets to keep them from sliding-down). I didn't want to get high-grain ammo because I don't want to stress an old gun. I checked for the ammo at several stands. When I asked at this stand, the first guy said he wasn't sure what I was talking about and called over another guy. I explained the above; I was looking for a low-grain bullet for a 1930 .38 S&W revolver that uses half-moon clips. He asked again what did I have. I re-explained; I needed .38 bullets for a revolver, looking for the lowest grain possible. He asked what I meant by half-moon clips. I explained that. He asked if I was sure I wasn't looking for .32s or did I actually have a Colt and not a S&W. No, I told him I was sure of what I had, I was just looking for the ammo. He said I better check to make sure, but he was positive I was actually looking for .32s.

Wow, wouldn't my Dad, Granddad and Great-Grandad be surprised that all these years they'd been shooting .38 out of a .38 revolver they should have actually been shooting .32s!? That's a magic gun right there. -End Sarcasm-

On the plus side, I finally found .22 shorts; only 2-stands had those!

NecessaryCatharsis
02-24-2014, 02:29 AM
I once spent almost 1/2 an hour trying to convince the guy at the auto parts store that my truck was a straight 6, not a v6, no those are two different things, yes I'm sure my truck is a STRAIGHT 6, no it's not a v6 ..... I gave up, went home without my part and tried a different store the next weekend. Most places/guys I have no problem with, but there are men (and women) out there that are convinced, despite all evidence to the contrary, that you need a penis to solve complex auto/hardware/hunting/whatever problems. I've learned to laugh it off, clearly anyone who thinks that 50% of the worlds population can be discounted as not worth my effort to worry about.

mathnerd
02-24-2014, 03:09 AM
As a chick that works on her own car, I get this attitude all the time. My favorite was the dude who tried to tell me I had an oil leak. This was when I had purchased new tires I snorted and asked if he knew the difference between oil and transmission fluid, and the fact that he thought he could swindle some "dumb girl" out of money assured that the shop would never see another dime of my money. I did not have an oil leak, but I did have a substantial transmission fluid leak.

TheSHAD0W
02-24-2014, 09:32 PM
Hm. The common .38 S&W and .38 Special cartridges are both rimmed, so you wouldn't need moon clips to hold them. I've seen them for revolvers for 9mm and .45 ACP. What .38 caliber ammunition does that pistol take? I'm kind of interested; if you could post the model # of that revolver I'd appreciate it.

(edit) Okay, found it; most likely what you're looking for is .38 ACP ammunition. There's another round called .38 Super, which would also fit in your pistol, but unless you're certain the pistol is capable of handling it do *not* use it; it is a much hotter round and could result in a failure.

Found on the net: http://www.ammo-one.com/38APCAuto.html (not an endorsement, don't know the seller).

.38 Super is a more common cartridge, and can be found in many stores, but again, I can't be sure if your pistol can take it. If you'll post the model number I'll take a look.

(edit 2)
He asked if I was sure I wasn't looking for .32s or did I actually have a Colt and not a S&W
Dumbass. Colt originated the round, but it's not uncommon for other manufacturers to make firearms chambered to other companies' specs. Look at .45 ACP.

Arcus
02-24-2014, 11:34 PM
So called experts don't believe anyone that says something they don't think is right. I had a guy at an auto parts store that argued with me about what transmission my car had. His computer said I had a different one than my manual that came with the car, the dealer, and the transmission shop next door said I had. Even after showing him all the proof I had, he still sold me the wrong part (and lied to me about it.) That is when I learned that if you put a vacuum modulator for a Ford AOD transmission in an A4LD, the transmission nukes itself.

pitmonkey
02-25-2014, 07:20 AM
I have found reload specs for the 38 S&W top break revolver. It does state to be careful because of the age of the gun. So just keep looking.

otakuneko
02-26-2014, 12:54 AM
Too bad you couldn't give 'em a reeeeeal up close and personal view of the gun, if you know what I mean. :devil:

raudf
02-26-2014, 02:16 AM
I once spent almost 1/2 an hour trying to convince the guy at the auto parts store that my truck was a straight 6, not a v6, no those are two different things, yes I'm sure my truck is a STRAIGHT 6, no it's not a v6 ..... I gave up, went home without my part and tried a different store the next weekend. Most places/guys I have no problem with, but there are men (and women) out there that are convinced, despite all evidence to the contrary, that you need a penis to solve complex auto/hardware/hunting/whatever problems. I've learned to laugh it off, clearly anyone who thinks that 50% of the worlds population can be discounted as not worth my effort to worry about.

I gave up after five minutes trying to convince the guy that a 2003 Toyota Echo (with A/C - this is important!) has two belts. One to drive the alternator, A/C and water pump. The second one drives the power steering (given it was optional). Yes, I know the images tend to show one. Yes, I know they are both called "drive belts," but there are two and I need both.

paxillated
02-26-2014, 06:32 AM
I never had a problem at my local parts store, back in the day. Very local - about 3 blocks from my house, IIRC. Then again, the first few times I showed up, I had the old part in my hand, was dirty from removing it, and just said, I need one of these. They got used to me, I guess. They even gave me advice when I asked for it - and it was good advice, too. My rather obvious female parts made no difference. (And that was 35-40 years ago. That was my beloved '67 Dart, with the good old slant six.) It sux that there are still guys who think females are dumb. Oh, I know, it's cause we only have one head - and they keep their brains in the one we don't have, poor dears. Bless their hearts!

My funniest experience was when I was living in a cow town, with my '65 VW bug. The alternator blew. I just took my long-shanked screwdriver and used it to make the connection to start the car. I kept that screwdriver in the engine compartment.

I also got a bad sunburn, right at the top of my thighs, and had to swap my pants for a skirt (mid-calf) until it healed. Since it was one I kept it for dress-up, it was nice looking. I finally decided to get a new alternator, and needed some tune-up parts, too. I made a list, because getting those part numbers right was important. For instance, in '65, they used 3 different alternators!

So I went to the parts store, in my pretty skirt outfit, with my list. I backed in to the parking place, which was right in front of the glass-fronted store, so I wouldn't have to change the alternator with cars & trucks going by. It seemed easiest to just give the counter guy my list. He informed me there was a core charge for the alternator.

So I took my bag of parts, popped the hood, grabbed the big screwdriver, changed out the alternator, and went back inside to get the core charge back. Remember the glass front? The counter guy had seen me, and was still picking his jaw up off the floor! I hadn't even thought about the skirt. I guess he thought I was buying them for whoever was working on my car.

All because one day I was cleaning and oiling my old (1953) sewing machine for the umpteenth time, and had parts strewn everywhere. I took a look at them all and thought, Hey, I could probably learn how to do a tune-up! I never looked back. Not until cars got all computerized, anyway.

wolfie
02-27-2014, 01:35 PM
I once spent almost 1/2 an hour trying to convince the guy at the auto parts store that my truck was a straight 6, not a v6, no those are two different things, yes I'm sure my truck is a STRAIGHT 6, no it's not a v6

Was the truck either somewhat older (i.e. before mid-80s) or a medium or heavy duty model? V6 engines became popular when FWD expanded to mid-size cars - easier to design a FWD transverse engine car for a V6 than for a straight 6, so rather than make both kinds of engines, the RWD models (such as pickups) got the V6 engines as well. Medium and heavy duty still use straight 6 (stronger design than V6) - the Ram 2500/3500 with Cummins has a straight 6, and current production big rigs ALL have straight 6 engines.

Ironclad Alibi
02-27-2014, 03:46 PM
[Old Gun Trivia]

In the movie The Maltese Falcon, the following happens:

Spade refers to the gun as an automatic, yet he is shown a revolver. The gun shown is a Webley-Fosbery automatic. This was a revolver that used the recoil of the shot to turn the cylinder and re-cock the weapon. It was very well made, but susceptible to dirt and fouling and so, as Spade said, "They don't make 'em anymore". However, it was made in two versions, a six-shot .455 and an eight-shot .38 ACP, so it can't actually be an eight-shot .45 as Spade says it is. (From IMDB.com (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0033870/trivia?tab=gf&ref_=tt_trv_gf#not_a_goof))

The book has the following:

He took a fat revolver from his coat-pocket and held it out to Spade. Mud inlaid the depressions in the revolver's surface. "A Webley. English, ain't it?"

Spade took his elbow from the fence-post and leaned down to look at the weapon, but he did not touch it. "Yes," he said, "Webley-Fosbery automatic revolver. That's it. Thirty-eight, eight shot. They don't make them any more.

[/Old Gun Trivia]

AccountingDrone
02-27-2014, 04:20 PM
Try having had a 1984 Ford Escort DIESEL, which most mechanics and parts people [even at the Ford dealership] don't believe ever existed. One of the best little road trip cars I ever crossed the entire country twice in. 45-52 MPG, and it was a manual. I loved that little maroon thing.

Shalom
02-28-2014, 04:09 AM
I had something like this once. Our work van was an early 80s Chevy with the 250cid straight-6 in it. This translated as 4.1 litres, and the parts guy kept trying to tell me it was a V8. I finally asked him if he was looking under Cadillac? (The 1985+ Caddies came with a 4.1 V8) Try under Chevrolet instead. Then he found it.

(And the reverse once: my dad's '81 Olds had a 260 V8, and they couldn't wrap their brains around the existence of a 4.3 V8; it HAD to be a V6, right?)

wolfie
02-28-2014, 04:31 AM
A bit off-topic, but still in the "Nope, it ain't so" category, a while back at an auto parts store I saw an exhaust manifold gasket set where the packaging said it was for all Chevy V-8 engines from 396 to 454 cubic inches. Not a Chevy owner, but there are some engines in that range that the gasket set WON'T fit. Let's see who else knows why.:D

dalesys
02-28-2014, 04:40 AM
I remember seeing a classified ad for a stock '7x Pinto sedan with a 427...

Racket_Man
02-28-2014, 04:54 AM
I remember seeing a classified ad for a stock '7x Pinto sedan with a 427...

Maybe not a 427 BUT I seem to remember a stock 197x's Pinto with some size V8. I remember it even had the V symbol on the front quarter panels.

Docmayhem
03-01-2014, 03:41 PM
A bit off-topic, but still in the "Nope, it ain't so" category, a while back at an auto parts store I saw an exhaust manifold gasket set where the packaging said it was for all Chevy V-8 engines from 396 to 454 cubic inches. Not a Chevy owner, but there are some engines in that range that the gasket set WON'T fit. Let's see who else knows why.:D

Be fun to try to put that on a small block 400...

dalesys
03-01-2014, 04:17 PM
Be fun to try to put that on a small block 400...
That would call for massive application of UBH followed by BANE.

(Use Bigger Hammer, Buy A New Engine)

ADeMartino
03-01-2014, 10:57 PM
So called experts don't believe anyone that says something they don't think is right. I had a guy at an auto parts store that argued with me about what transmission my car had. His computer said I had a different one than my manual that came with the car, the dealer, and the transmission shop next door said I had. Even after showing him all the proof I had, he still sold me the wrong part (and lied to me about it.) That is when I learned that if you put a vacuum modulator for a Ford AOD transmission in an A4LD, the transmission nukes itself.

He did INDEED sell you the wrong part, because AODs don't have vacuum modulators. The pre-electronic models use something called a Throttle Valve cable to control shift points and downshifts (linkages in the earliest applications). The TV cable fulfills the same function as the VM and kickdown linkages on the old 3-speed slushboxes. The electronic AOD-E automatics don't even have the TV cables or linkages; they're controlled by the car's ECM.

The A4LD is/was an evolution of the old C3, and I'm betting he sold you a VM from a C3 or possibly one of the other C-automatics (there was also a C4, a C5, and a C6) or maybe even one for an old FMX. An incorrect modulator (or one improperly installed) can lead to rapid transmission failure.

All that said, the A4LD is known as a problematic unit, especially the early units, and particularly so in 'truck/van' platforms.

Arcus
03-02-2014, 01:25 AM
I had an '88 Thunderbird Turbo Coupe. Their computer said that all '88 Thunderbirds used an AOD. The V6 and V8 used the AOD while the Turbo Coupe used the A4LD. The A4LD in my car worked just fine till the VM blew a seal and the the engine began pulling transmission fluid though the vacuum lines. The VM he gave me had a tube that went 1/8 too far into the transmission but looked the same everywhere else. That 1/8 was the difference between working and eating itself up inside. The shop that rebuilt it had the same thing that happened to them with the wrong VM when they reinstalled the transmission after they rebuilt it.

ADeMartino
03-02-2014, 03:15 AM
I had an '88 Thunderbird Turbo Coupe. Their computer said that all '88 Thunderbirds used an AOD. The V6 and V8 used the AOD while the Turbo Coupe used the A4LD. The A4LD in my car worked just fine till the VM blew a seal and the the engine began pulling transmission fluid though the vacuum lines. The VM he gave me had a tube that went 1/8 too far into the transmission but looked the same everywhere else. That 1/8 was the difference between working and eating itself up inside. The shop that rebuilt it had the same thing that happened to them with the wrong VM when they reinstalled the transmission after they rebuilt it.

Yup. The modulator controls hydraulic line pressure in the transmission, which affects shift points and 'apply' pressure of the clutch bands. Line pressure too low = premature shift points and low apply pressure for the clutch bands. The result of this is massive slippage (especially in high gear) and lots heat. In short, the trans ate its clutches in a hurry. The non-computerized AODs will do the same thing if the TV linkage/cable is improperly adjusted.

By '88, Ford did have most of the problems with the A4LD sorted out. A lot of the earlier models were a nightmare. The old C3 they're based on was a very light duty unit intended for four-cylinder and small V6 applications like Pinto, Mustang II, and similar 'low powered' models. They had to do a lot of beefing-up of the A4LD to get it to live in the Turbo Coupe. On the plus side, it was a fairly compact and efficient automatic once they got it dialed-in right.

protege
03-02-2014, 03:28 PM
So called experts don't believe anyone that says something they don't think is right. I had a guy at an auto parts store that argued with me about what transmission my car had.

Been there, done that. I had some 10-minute oil change place try to sell me a "transmission service." Er, did I mention that my cars have always been stick-shifts? Last time I checked, dumping automatic transmission fluid into a four- (or five) speed will trash it in relatively short order :eek: Same shop also insisted that my car had five forward gears, never mind the 1,2,3,4,R pattern stamped into the gear lever knob. Granted, some Tercels *did* come with five-speeds. But, the base model coupe only came with four. Needless to say, I didn't go back.

Then there's the big chain garage...that insisted the Tercel took halogen lights, and told me I needed one of the replaceable bulb types. Again, that was true of some of those cars. But again, my car was the base model...which came with the older-style square lights, not the "aero" lights fitted to the other trim levels. He relented after following me outside to see the car :rolleyes:

I see this crap all the time, and I'm a guy. I can't imagine how you ladies have it. I think it's freaking awesome that some women choose to work on their own cars and other things. BTW, anyone know where I can find one? :p

mathnerd
03-02-2014, 05:16 PM
I think it's freaking awesome that some women choose to work on their own cars and other things. BTW, anyone know where I can find one? :p

Have you checked the auto parts stores for women who are about ready to vault the counter to beat the shit out of the moron at the register?

Seriously though, I've found that men tend to be either seriously turned on or seriously threatened by women who work on their own cars. There are, of course, exceptions, but the overwhelming majority fall into one of those two attitudes.

protege
03-02-2014, 10:16 PM
Have you checked the auto parts stores for women who are about ready to vault the counter to beat the shit out of the moron at the register?

Unfortunately, there are never any around :(

Deserted
03-03-2014, 04:37 AM
Have you checked the auto parts stores for women who are about ready to vault the counter to beat the shit out of the moron at the register?

That would be my girlfriend. She know more about cars than many auto parts lackeys do.

mathnerd
03-03-2014, 06:14 AM
That's been me on more than one occasion. :lol:

wolfie
03-03-2014, 01:27 PM
the packaging said it was for all Chevy V-8 engines from 396 to 454 cubic inches

Be fun to try to put that on a small block 400...

Exactly! They ignored the fact that the smallest big block is smaller than the biggest small block.

ADeMartino
03-05-2014, 02:38 PM
Well, as has been demonstrated, the parts books aren't always right. I've even come across errors in factory parts manuals - stuff I know absolutely to be wrong. That's the difference between a 'book' guy and a 'real world' guy at the parts counter. The books are written, copied, recopied, reformatted, reprinted and so on so many times that it's virtually impossible for them to be 100 percent accurate. And factory parts manuals are often used to create aftermarket parts catalogs - and errors transcribing the information can lead to some real fun times, I can tell you.

And it doesn't help that the factories will sometimes make a running change midyear, and not properly document it. Then there are the guys who 'Frankenstein' their cars - the car is basically a mashup of parts from six other cars. Look, I know this is the essence of hot rodding. Hell, I've done it myself. As me about my 351C-powered Maverick some time. But I know what changes I've made and where the parts come from, so if I need to replace something, I can ask for exactly what's needed. But when the car gets sold to someone else....NOW there's a problem, because odds are that individual has no clue what the previous owner has done.

My favorites, though, were the people driving late-1970s and early-1980s GM products, the RWD models in particular, with special emphasis on the G-body cars (Olds Cutlass, Chevy Monte Carlo, Buick Regal, and Pontiac Grand Prix). Why? Because GM had a knack for playing mix and match with engines in those cars. It might be a Buick, but under your hood might reside an Olds, Pontiac, or even Chevrolet V6 or V8. And yes, the FACTORY did that. GM, in fact, got sued over that nonsense.

And the guys who insisted that 'all GM engines were the same'. (yes, that was my little whimper of resigned despair you just heard)

And let's not even get into that Olds diesel V8 debacle. It's just too painful.

mathnerd
03-05-2014, 06:11 PM
And it doesn't help that the factories will sometimes make a running change midyear, and not properly document it.

I've been bitten by this one a few times with the car I currently drive. Of course, I have no clue what I'm talking about since I own a vagina and not a penis. :rolleyes: Never mind that one of the issues in in the brakes, and those have been changed a time or two in the nearly 15 years the car's been on the road.

Kal
03-05-2014, 06:39 PM
Seriously though, I've found that men tend to be either seriously turned on or seriously threatened by women who work on their own cars. There are, of course, exceptions, but the overwhelming majority fall into one of those two attitudes.

I know a song about that, more or less. To me, a woman who can do mechanical work of any sort is impressive, mainly on account of my mechanical ineptitude.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYZTvRgTupY&feature=kp

mathnerd
03-05-2014, 06:57 PM
See, I get a bit of a chuckle about people thinking it's impressive. It's all about what's "normal" for you. I grew up working on cars with my father and grandmother. My grandmother was an airplane mechanic. Women working on engines was just normal for us. I'm comfortable with power tools because it was simply expected that the kids would help with the family business (my parents own rental houses), and when things needed to be repaired, we'd tag along and help. In the aftermath of hurricane Andrew, it was all hands on deck, as there were 27 townhouses and single family homes completely destroyed. Again, this was just normal. The one thing I'm a little leery of, however, is electrical. For whatever reason, I never got comfortable with that.

Kal
03-05-2014, 07:29 PM
See, I get a bit of a chuckle about people thinking it's impressive. It's all about what's "normal" for you. I grew up working on cars with my father and grandmother. My grandmother was an airplane mechanic. Women working on engines was just normal for us. I'm comfortable with power tools because it was simply expected that the kids would help with the family business (my parents own rental houses), and when things needed to be repaired, we'd tag along and help. In the aftermath of hurricane Andrew, it was all hands on deck, as there were 27 townhouses and single family homes completely destroyed. Again, this was just normal. The one thing I'm a little leery of, however, is electrical. For whatever reason, I never got comfortable with that.

That's the thing; impressive is something you're unable to do yourself.
I can do pretty much anything woodwork related and some simple electrics and plumbing; complex electrics and mechanicals, nope.

Ironclad Alibi
03-05-2014, 07:42 PM
Then there are the guys who 'Frankenstein' their cars - the car is basically a mashup of parts from six other cars.

I guess that is the cue for this song (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWHniL8MyMM).

mathnerd
03-05-2014, 09:13 PM
Kal, that's what I mean. It's what's normal for you. This sort of stuff is normal for me, but there's other stuff I can't do to save my life. I can't sew beyond straight stitching and buttons, crafting or anything artistic is just not gonna happen, I'm a merely competent cook (though I can bake quite well), keeping a tidy house on a day to day basis seems overwhelming (though I can clean up a disaster with the best of them), I learned to program computers only because my degree required it, but I suck at it and forgot almost everything I ever knew, hair, makeup and fashion sense are just beyond me, and the list goes on. I grew up working on cars with my grandmother and father, so it's normal for me. Other people grew up doing the sorts of stuff I can't do, but it's normal for them. :)