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bhskittykatt
02-10-2015, 01:35 PM
On a recent thread (http://www.customerssuck.com/board/showthread.php?t=109833), I briefly noted at the end that one of Hubby's CW's died on a job site recently. It was diabetic-related death.

During the course of the investigation, neighbors were interviewed, and some new and somewhat infuriating details have emerged, however.

If you're having a really good day, you may want to stop reading this now and come back later.

The site is an office building that is typically closed on weekends. They have weekend guards who basically sit in their cars and patrol around the outside every hour. The building is locked, so they just patrol the outside grounds.

Around 6am the day of the incident, the guard apparently realized he was beginning to have serious trouble. His cell phone was dead, unfortunately, and he must not have had a car charger. So he went to get help.

He went to the house across the street to get help. He knocked and someone answered the door. He told them he was having a medical emergency and to call 911.

They shut the door in his face.

They shut the door in his face.

He apparently made it back to his car and gave himself an insulin injection, but it was too late. At 11am, an office employee found him dead in his car. Time of death was ruled to be around 7am.

He needed help, and they shut the door in his face.

I am so infuriated and disgusted and furious about this. I know which house it is too...on weekdays I deliver to that office building, so I see that house every day (everything around them is apartments that don't face the street, so it's the only place the guard would have made it to). It was all I could do this morning when I heard the news to not go over there and pound down their door and give them a piece of my mind. :mad::mad::mad:

If they'd called 911 like he'd asked, there's a chance he could have gotten help in time and survived. He would have at least had a chance. But they didn't. They willfully ignored him. And now he's dead. :burnup:

I'm presuming these details emerged when the house occupants were interviewed, meaning they surely must know by now the outcome of what happened. I hope to hell they feel guilty and carry this guilt with them. They knew he was in trouble. The guard flat-out told them he was diabetic and in a medical crisis. And they fucking did nothing.

I'll be in my corner fuming if anyone needs me. :(

KuariKaydrith
02-10-2015, 01:53 PM
Allow me to join you in your corner. That could so easily have been any of us, sadly.

Monterey Jack
02-10-2015, 02:16 PM
Unbelievable.

Kanalah
02-10-2015, 02:36 PM
That's pathetic!

One Christmas morning at 6am, we got a knock on our door. It was our neighbor. She was covered in blood and her face was so swollen she could barely see. Her husband has beaten her up. Not only did my mom call 911, she made her coffee, wrapped a blanket around her and sat and talked with her until the police and paramedics arrived.

That happened over 20 years ago and I still remember it vividly. That is how you handle someone who needs help.

mhkohne
02-10-2015, 03:13 PM
Is there someone in the house with diminished mental capacity or something? I'm trying to think of a reason that someone would open the door and REFUSE to call 911 for someone. Other than someone with serious issues, I can't come up with a reason that doesn't involve being a absolutely horrible person.

Shalom
02-10-2015, 03:45 PM
You know what. I can very easily come up with a scenario to explain this.

The people in the house had some kind of vendetta against the property across the street. Maybe their house was there first, and then someone built a commercial/office/industrial space across the street in the vacant lot, and they resent other people doing what they like with their own damn property without asking their holy selves first. Maybe twenty years ago someone from there parked blocking their alley or something stupid like that, and they've born a grudge ever since.

So when someone from that property came there looking for help, they said F* you and closed the door on him. Haha, they said, we finally got back at those @$$holes. And they sat down gleefully rubbing their hands together and had coffee.

eta: :burnup:

Hopefully karma will come back and bite them on the ass. Hard. And soon.

Sandman
02-10-2015, 04:18 PM
Involuntary manslaughter comes to mind...

Zellie Crescent
02-10-2015, 04:19 PM
:(. That truly sucks, I'm sorry that happened. If I were you knowing I'd have to deliver to that very place that the guy sought help from I would leave a note as well saying "Thanks for letting that man die you asshole!" Then again that's just me.

morgana
02-10-2015, 06:09 PM
Does the deceased have family that could sue the bejeezus out of these people?

I also wonder, what would be the outcome of a series of persons with signs sitting on the sidewalk across from this house? Signs saying things like "Don't ask for help." "Calling 911 is too much trouble." "We'll let you die." "Heartless." And handouts for anyone who asks about them.

I mean, they admitted it, right? People should be warned, right? :rant:

Jay 2K Winger
02-10-2015, 06:25 PM
I have no words.

At least no words that can be repeated in mixed company.

notalwaysright
02-10-2015, 06:30 PM
So... When the neighbor was interviewed he/she told the police "Oh, him? Yeah, he came over with some BS story about an emergency, and I was NOT going to fall for that!" I mean, how freaking stupid and heartless can you be?

Will be interesting to see what, if anything happens to that person.

RealUnimportant
02-10-2015, 08:57 PM
Ye gods; normally calling for help is the natural reaction when a stranger calls... But the one time the stranger actually asks for that? Boo! Boo, I say! :(

Android Kaeli
02-11-2015, 03:02 AM
Quick question: do the guards wear any type of uniform that states they are security or work for the office building?

Reason why I ask is because a complete stranger banging at my door at 6am that says they are having a 'medical emergency' will set off my alarm bells. Doesn't mean that I condone the actions of the neighbors nor would I refuse to call 911, but I would be highly suspicious of it.

Seanette
02-11-2015, 03:39 AM
I would have qualms about admitting a stranger, especially if I were home alone (home invasion robberies do happen in my area). However, I'd be calling 911 ASAP.

Just ignoring the matter is not an option.

CorneliaMarieRocks
02-11-2015, 03:51 AM
In the infamous words of Dr. McCoy, good God man! :jawdrop:

If I had been the officer/detective involved, I'd have hauled these sorry wastes of space in front of the deceased's family (if he had any) & demand they admit to the family that they refused help for their loved one, help that may well have saved his life :(

I mean, how much effort does it take to dial 3 numbers????

HawaiianShirts
02-11-2015, 05:14 AM
I would have qualms about admitting a stranger, especially if I were home alone (home invasion robberies do happen in my area). However, I'd be calling 911 ASAP.

Just ignoring the matter is not an option.

That's what I was thinking. Perhaps these people were afraid that it was a robbery attempt of the let-me-in-so-I-can-steal-your-stuff variety. But Seanette is doubly right: A stranger asking to come in might be suspicious; a stranger asking for a 911 call is significantly less suspicious. I like to think that, if I doubted his story, I would have asked him for details and then closed the door to make the call.

These people were either horribly inconsiderate or overly paranoid.


Off Topic: bhskittykatt, I have used your signature in church lessons and work presentations several times now, and I'm starting to hear it repeated by others in both settings.

bhskittykatt
02-11-2015, 10:54 AM
Quick question: do the guards wear any type of uniform that states they are security or work for the office building?


They have a full uniform, with fancy patches and everything, when they are on-duty. They are very readily identifiable as an officer of some sort.

Even if he wasn't, they didn't have to let him in. Just had to call 911 to come out and check it out.

Is there someone in the house with diminished mental capacity or something? ...

The house is full of about six or so college students. Clinically, I don't think they are all of "diminished mental capacity", though by a non-clinical definition....

You know what. I can very easily come up with a scenario to explain this.

The people in the house had some kind of vendetta against the property across the street....


Can't rule this out, as said house is a known party house and part of the reason for the hired security is to prevent said parties from spilling over onto the office property, which historically was a problem.

However in fairness I haven't seen them throw a major party there in about two years. I think it was just a case of not wanting to get involved in any sort of capacity, not even to dial 911. :(

Irving Patrick Freleigh
02-11-2015, 02:33 PM
I would have qualms about admitting a stranger, especially if I were home alone (home invasion robberies do happen in my area). However, I'd be calling 911 ASAP.

Just ignoring the matter is not an option.

I thought about that, but somebody in the midst of an insulin emergency probably isn't going to look like a threat to anyone.

What do I always say? Oh yeah: Humanity; I'm very disappointed in it.

cindybubbles
02-11-2015, 06:56 PM
Is there someone in the house with diminished mental capacity or something? I'm trying to think of a reason that someone would open the door and REFUSE to call 911 for someone. Other than someone with serious issues, I can't come up with a reason that doesn't involve being a absolutely horrible person.

Still slightly better than that time where a man shot a teenage girl who banged on his door pleading for help just because she was black, though.

Heartless, but still slightly better. Emphasis on the word "slightly".

Silent-Hunter
02-12-2015, 09:27 PM
I think we need a new law. People should be able to be prosecuted for refusing to help. China drafted a law like that after something similar happened.

protege
02-13-2015, 12:35 AM
I thought about that, but somebody in the midst of an insulin emergency probably isn't going to look like a threat to anyone.


Unfortunately, there have been a few cases (locally) where people have faked emergencies, or claimed "car problems" in order to force their way into homes. Not very often, but enough that I'd be a bit wary if someone was pounding on my door at 3am. If that happened, I'd offer to make the call, but keep the door closed. Nothing personal, but I'm not about to chance facing the barrel of a 9mm.

Seanette
02-13-2015, 03:41 AM
Unfortunately, there have been a few cases (locally) where people have faked emergencies, or claimed "car problems" in order to force their way into homes. Not very often, but enough that I'd be a bit wary if someone was pounding on my door at 3am. If that happened, I'd offer to make the call, but keep the door closed. Nothing personal, but I'm not about to chance facing the barrel of a 9mm.

This is my position. Yes, I'll call 911, but from the other side of a locked door.

Arcus
02-13-2015, 03:55 AM
This is horrible. I would have a hard time not calling the local news and reporting a group of self-centered collage students that let a man die.

Zellie Crescent
02-13-2015, 11:57 AM
I'd do that too, how the fuck can you live with yourself knowing that someone is DEAD because of you?!

BeeMused
02-13-2015, 05:03 PM
I think we need a new law. People should be able to be prosecuted for refusing to help. China drafted a law like that after something similar happened.

In Germany there is such a law. To quote Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duty_to_rescue):

In Germany, "Unterlassene Hilfeleistung" (failure to provide assistance) is an offense according to section 323c[33] of the Strafgesetzbuch; a citizen is obliged to provide help in case of accident or general danger if necessary, and is normally immune from prosecution if assistance given in good faith and following the average reasonable person's understanding of required measures turns out to be harmful. Also the helper may not be held responsible if the action he should take in order to help is unacceptable for him and he is unable to act (for example when unable to act at the sight of blood). In Germany, knowledge of basic emergency measures and First Aid and CPR Certification is a prerequisite for the granting of a driving license.

Not to open the door is reasonable, but not calling 911 from behind the closed door is not and will get you in trouble.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
02-14-2015, 12:05 AM
Oh, I totally understand making the call from behind a closed door, but to open the door, shut it again in his face and go back to bed?

That's cold.