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View Full Version : Come with me if you want to live


evilhomer
02-18-2015, 12:44 AM
You must read the thread title in Arnold's "Terminator" voice :p (or in Casper's if that's more your style).

A local grocery store has a pretty good sale on bottled water. The floor was cleared out but it was leaked that a fresh pallett was on it's way out. I was right in the area so I figured I'd wait and grab a couple, this put me at the front of the line. You'd think we were on the dawn of an apocolypse by the way the crowd gathered and got frenzied as the dude brought it out. While I'm not a giant by any means, I was far and away the biggest guy in the area, and most definately the meanest, so when pushing started, an "EXCUSE ME!!! Wait your turn!" command from me was somewhat respected. I was able to get my two, then the swarm started. The poor clerk was busy trying to finish cutting the wrap off the pallett and I had to talk him out of it:

Me: Dude, you're going to get trampled here.
Clerk: I just have to get this cut.
Me: Dude, fuck these idiots, let them be animals if they want to be
Clerk: How do I get out of here?
Me: Just stay behind me.

I took a quick look to make sure there were no elderly or children in my path, then literally bulldozed my way through the swarm. The clerk thanked me and I told him that people like this aren't worth it, if they want to behave like that just save yourself and get away from them.

I swear it was a scene right out of The Walking Dead, people ripping and tearing away at the pallett and getting whatever piece they could reach. The stack of 80 or so cases was gone in under a minute.

MoonCat
02-19-2015, 12:00 AM
Geez, is there a water shortage in your town or what??

I mean, booze, chocolate, naked pics of Maurice Lombardo (google it) I could understand, but bottled water??

fireheart
02-19-2015, 01:25 AM
I heard this in Elizabeth Banks's voice...."Come with me if you wanna not die." :lol:

evilhomer
02-19-2015, 02:52 AM
Geez, is there a water shortage in your town or what??

I mean, booze, chocolate, naked pics of Maurice Lombardo (google it) I could understand, but bottled water??

Nope, just a ridiculous over-abundance of cheap people. Knock 50 cents off the price of something and you start a riot.

Gilhelmi
02-19-2015, 09:41 AM
Strange people. Makes me worried what would happen in a real disaster.

(also, this is most of the reason why I no longer openly tell people that I am a prepper.)

WishfulSpirit
05-05-2015, 05:50 AM
Strange people. Makes me worried what would happen in a real disaster.

In general, people behave BETTER in disasters than they do at sales. You might have a frenzy if you knew something was coming (like before a major snowstorm) but sudden disasters bring out the best in people. After the floods here in Colorado, I was really touched by the way people pulled together. People who had very little to spare for themselves were handing out their own blankets and clothes to those whose houses got washed away.

EricKei
05-05-2015, 04:37 PM
The best part is, the frenzied masses seem to prepare for a forewarned disaster by stocking up on perishables like milk and ice cream...when the expectation is that the power will be out for some time >_<

WishfulSpirit
05-05-2015, 04:55 PM
The best part is, the frenzied masses seem to prepare for a forewarned disaster by stocking up on perishables like milk and ice cream...when the expectation is that the power will be out for some time >_<

Lots of people in the mountain communities around here have generators. In that kind of situation, not having access to grocery stores food would be the issue, not power. Lots of them are also hunters and have a chest freezer full of deer meat. I wouldn't want to lose several hundred pounds of that.

Antisocial_Worker
05-06-2015, 07:09 AM
My hotel gives out bottled water, and people are constantly requesting bottles as they pass by the front desk. As someone who was born and raised in this area though, drinking water from a bottle is a mystifying phenomenon. I finally asked one lady who wanted three bottles why she needed it.

Her reaction: "You can drink the tapwater here?" As though it was an alien concept. I explained that you can do more than just drink it; eighteen breweries and counting have come to town specifically to use it. Apparently we have some of the best water in the country. She was duly impressed and noted that where she was from, the water tastes like sulfer.

That must be awful. Here, the only reason you'd ever need a bottle of water is to have something to refill throughout the day from the sink or the drinking fountain.

WishfulSpirit
05-06-2015, 03:21 PM
Was she from Cali? Not only does tap water there taste like sulfer, it is noticeably yellow. I'm glad to be back in Colorado, where the water tastes descent.

wolfie
05-06-2015, 04:20 PM
Her reaction: "You can drink the tapwater here?" As though it was an alien concept. I explained that you can do more than just drink it; eighteen breweries and counting have come to town specifically to use it. Apparently we have some of the best water in the country.

I'm glad to be back in Colorado, where the water tastes descent.

And in Colorado, there's at least one community with water so good that the brewery there boasts about it in their national advertising.

AccountingDrone
05-06-2015, 05:27 PM
Was she from Cali? Not only does tap water there taste like sulfer, it is noticeably yellow. I'm glad to be back in Colorado, where the water tastes descent.

*snicker* I startled a few Germans when I ordered Gerolsteiner water - it is noticeably sulphury. Our summer house had a well that was sulphury and tinted reddish brown from the iron in the ground. I am certain it was loaded with other minerals as well =) We had it tested every spring, and it was perfectly safe to drink, just oddly flavored. But it is a taste from the past, so whenever I get a chance I will order it. Most Americans want unflavored water.

I will agree, some areas have heavily chlorinated water and salt softened water that makes it unpalatable to me. I will do bottled water there, but sulphur never bothered me =)

morgana
05-06-2015, 05:54 PM
Ah, naturally-flavored tap water . . . Used to live in a house in the country. Place had a whole-house water filter: it needed it. We gauged when to change the filters by turning on the shower in the downstairs bathroom.

If the house suddenly smelled like rotten eggs, turn the shower back off and change the filters.

Even WITH the whole-house filter, we used a Britta pitcher for the drinking water.

notalwaysright
05-06-2015, 08:33 PM
I grew up drinking well-water, which was great. Amazing. Seriously the best water I've ever had. It wasn't sulfuric at all, though I suppose it had a very slight mineral-ish taste. However Tacoma water tastes like drinking a swimming pool. Can we say chlorine? We never drank it. The water here seems to vary. I have a Brita pitcher, and that makes it taste decent. But there are huge areas in the US were it is completely unheard of to drink tap water. Some people are just snobs, of course. In this area it's like the "cool" thing to have some sort of reusable water bottle with you. This one (http://nalgene.com/) is popular. Very trendy. Oh god. I have two of them...

And as for acting better during a disaster. Well, I remember one year when we had a big ice storm. Our power was out for seven days. The town itself was out for three. The locally owned stores were price gouging terribly. Think $10 for a taper candle. $20 for a gallon of water. At the time I think we only had two grocery stores, and only one was a bigger national one, which did not mark up prices. So yeah. Maybe individuals were being neighborly, but certainly not those local businesses. Which are all gone now, btw.

WishfulSpirit
05-07-2015, 05:01 AM
And in Colorado, there's at least one community with water so good that the brewery there boasts about it in their national advertising.

Oh yes, Coors. We actually have the highest number of breweries per capita. I'm not a drinker but Hubby much prefers a local microbrew to any of the big beers (and there's a Bud brewery here too).

morgana
05-07-2015, 07:36 PM
one year when we had a big ice storm. Our power was out for seven days. The town itself was out for three. The locally owned stores were price gouging terribly. -snip- So yeah. Maybe individuals were being neighborly, but certainly not those local businesses. Which are all gone now, btw.

Woah, flashback! 9/11, Topeka Kansas, big run on gasoline because of everybody panicking. So most of the stations do put their prices up by a dime or so a gallon.

Except one owner on the south edge of the city, who TRIPLED his prices. Some people yelled, some people paid, some people yelled and then paid . . . Then somebody called the cops who came out and had a chat with him. And called the company that held the label on his franchise. Gee, suddenly his prices were only about twenty-five cents a gallon more than before the towers fell.

Funny thing, though. The station burned down three days later, while he was out of town having a not very comfortable chat with a bigwig from his company. Cops never did figure out how it started . . .

Topeka's an interesting city.

DGoddessChardonnay
05-07-2015, 10:24 PM
Her reaction: "You can drink the tapwater here?" As though it was an alien concept. I explained that you can do more than just drink it; eighteen breweries and counting have come to town specifically to use it. Apparently we have some of the best water in the country. She was duly impressed and noted that where she was from, the water tastes like sulfer.

That must be awful. Here, the only reason you'd ever need a bottle of water is to have something to refill throughout the day from the sink or the drinking fountain.

In my area, the water tastes a bit off. Can't recall what the city treated it with but there is information on the city's website for kidney dialysis patients, as well as fish and amphibious pet owners.

I'll just keep buying the bottled water by the cases . . . and I have a weekly ritual of checking the ads in the Sunday paper to see who's got the cheapest price on it for the week.;)

Chromatix
05-11-2015, 06:39 AM
Helsinki has some of the best tap water in the world.

It comes from a huge freshwater lake (Päijänne, which stretches from Lahti to Jyväskylä) via a 100km tunnel blasted through solid granite. It is then purified in an underground plant, using a process well-suited for water that's already pretty clean.

When that plant was under maintenance for several months, the water supply came from a different direction. There was a noticeable change in taste.

EricKei
05-11-2015, 02:16 PM
Lots of people in the mountain communities around here have generators.I grew up in New Orleans, where people buy perishables (and water) when a disaster is incoming despite the fact that almost nobody owns generators. Plenty of people try to "rent" one from the Mart of Wal (meaning, buy one, use it, and try to return it even though it's been used and is therefore unsellable), but that's true in many places.

As for the water -- we got ours from the Big Muddy -- the Mississippi River. We just had incredibly good filtration systems. That being said, anyone who could scrape the money to do so uses Kentwood/Abita Springs water delivery for their drinking water, and buys the stuff in 5-gallon jugs. Their product comes from springs up in the more rural areas near Boglausa.

Shalom
05-11-2015, 07:09 PM
I grew up in Brooklyn. We got our water from upstate New York via a set of tunnels. As far as I know, it's totally unfiltered (this leads to some questions as to whether the water is kosher, as it supposedly has copepods (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copepod) in it). The taste changed sometime in the 80s when as an "emergency" measure that's since become permanent, they started mixing in 10% Hudson River water (from up near Poughkeepsie, where it's allegedly cleaner than near the city) and had to increase the chlorination, but it's still better than the water anywhere else, at least if that's what you grew up drinking.

My boss, when I worked in Manhattan, moved from there to New Rochelle. He got into the habit of filling a gallon of water from the slop sink at the back of the shop and bringing it home with him.

Then I moved to Buffalo. Started drinking bottled water then. Distilled, by preference: I had it in the house to fill the iron, had nothing else to drink and found that the lack of taste was most reminiscent of what I'd been used to in New York.

WishfulSpirit
05-12-2015, 06:29 AM
(this leads to some questions as to whether the water is kosher, as it supposedly has copepods (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copepod) in it).

Don't most rabbis hold that a bug has to be visible with the naked eye to count, as microscopes weren't invented during Moses' time?

Anyway...the water in New York is so good for pizza that I've heard of at least one pizza shop owner in LA having a chemist chemically recreate Brooklyn water to use in their dough.

dalesys
05-12-2015, 11:03 AM
... a chemist chemically recreate Brooklyn water ...
EEE EEE EEE! In-Organic Artifice-ial Water! :runaway:

Shalom
05-12-2015, 03:54 PM
Don't most rabbis hold that a bug has to be visible with the naked eye to count, as microscopes weren't invented during Moses' time?

Pretty much, yeah. The argument is, some of them are large enough to see with the naked eye if you look really closely. I'm strictly kosher myself, and I don't worry about them, but some folks were running their water through a cloth for a while (as if that would help, I'd think they're small enough to get through pores in the cloth).

Vegetables are a bigger problem. It's almost impossible to get kosher brussels sprouts these days, as they're all infested with aphids since the banning of DDT. Or you can pay out the wazoo for frozen, greenhouse-grown, guaranteed bug-free sprouts (like 5-6 dollars a bag). Funny, brussels sprouts are the one vegetable stereotypically hated by children, but I always liked 'em. Asparagus are almost as bad; at least you can cut the tips off (that's where they live) and eat the stalks, or soak them in soapy water first to chase them off. It makes me wonder how many people, who aren't Jewish and don't need to worry about kashrus, know that they're eating bugs with their veggies?

WishfulSpirit
05-13-2015, 03:13 AM
It makes me wonder how many people, who aren't Jewish and don't need to worry about kashrus, know that they're eating bugs with their veggies?

I'm not too concerned about that if I don't actually SEE the bugs. Bugs are a heck of a lot less dangerous to one's health than a lot of the chemical pesticides (not that I can afford to eat only organic either). Then again, I despise both brussels sprouts and asparagus, so I guess I'm safe there. :lol:

Ironclad Alibi
05-13-2015, 03:56 AM
I'm not too concerned about that if I don't actually SEE the bugs.

I don't know about kosher, but the bugs I can't see are a lot more dangerous than the bugs I can see. Thankfully I was vaccinated as a kid.

Dreamstalker
05-13-2015, 02:51 PM
When I was a pup, my grandparents had well water (occasionally you had to let a glass of cold water sit for cloudiness to dissipate). That made the best coffee. Eventually they had to hook up to the town system, and I did notice a difference in taste.

When I lived in Santa Fe I didn't need the news to know we were in a drought--the tapwater would taste like chlorine (safe to drink, but it was probably coming from a silty level in the reservoir so they gave it extra treatment).

For a while here the tap water/ice cubes would smell like fish. It's fine now, but we still have a Brita for drinking/coffeemaker water.

Food Lady
05-14-2015, 01:13 AM
If the water isn't carbonated, I don't care how good the sale is. I just about refuse to drink still water. Iced tea is my still water. But even with a good seltzer sale, I'm not going into a fray like that! It's not worth the probably fifth head injury. People are nuts.

WishfulSpirit
05-14-2015, 02:02 AM
I don't know about kosher, but the bugs I can't see are a lot more dangerous than the bugs I can see. Thankfully I was vaccinated as a kid.

Fair enough, but we were talking about actually eating insects, not ingesting bacteria or viruses.

Shalom
05-14-2015, 04:32 PM
A friend of mine, let's call him Big Z, works as an inspector for one of the kosher certifying agencies. Recently he was working a venue that didn't usually host kosher events, trying to explain to the rather snooty caterer why he required him to decapitate the asparagus. The guy was reluctant, insisting that the tips were the finest part, and that there couldn't possibly be insects infesting them.

Big Z said "Look, I'll show you." He filled a sink with water, dumped in some salt, and swished the bunch of asparagus in it... and the little buggers came swarming off and floated up to the top. The caterer's eyes got completely round and he yells "Holy shit!" End of that argument...

rapana1
05-16-2015, 06:33 AM
It's so weird to think of a place where you can't drink water straight from the tap. By preference, my flatmate had a counter-top water filter installed in our kitchen, and that's what I use now to fill the jug, my water bottles, and the chiller jug in the fridge door. But if you hadn't grown up on drinking tank supply on a farm like she had, you'd probably be fine with a glass of town supply water straight from the tap anywhere in the country.

Lace Neil Singer
05-26-2015, 11:27 AM
I have an aversion to water so I don't drink plain water, but where I live, the tap water is metallic tasting. We use a water filter. Just six miles down the road where my parents live, and the water is much better tasting.