PDA

View Full Version : Pissed of handicapped parker


snugglegirl05
03-09-2015, 10:37 PM
One of my job duties as a porter for the parking company I work for is to issue parking violations at the surface lot I am responsible for cleaning on a daily basis. Parking violations for non payment or for an expired receipt. There is a pay machine located at the parking lot, and I have to pull a report from the pay machine indicating which parking spots are paid for and which parking spots have expired receipts.

I have to use a handheld machine and a handheld printer to input the information for the parking violations. The machine and the printer are located at the garage office at one of the parking garages my employer manages.

While I was logging into the machine, a female customer using a cane walks into the office. I was up front logging into the machine. She asks the front office staff if there is any more handicapped parking spots in the garage because the handicapped spots on the first level are full. Here is what happened.

front office employee: "The only handicapped parking spots we have are on the first level."
female customer: "Well those parking spots are full."
front office employee: "The handicapped parking spots are on a first come first serve basis."
female customer: "This is ridiculous. I cannot park because the handicapped spots are full. I have a reserved handicapped parking tag, and I need to park."
front office employee: "The handicapped parking spots are on a first come first serve basis."
female customer: "But those handicapped parking spots are full. I have a reserved handicapped parking tag, and I need to park."
front office employee: "Anyone having a handicapped parking tag can park in the handicapped spots. The customers parking in those spots have a handicapped parking tag just like you do."
female customer: "So are you telling me that the garage is overbooked?"
front office employee: "No. There are enough handicapped parking spots for the public. Those spots happen to be full right now."
female customer: "Then I will just have to complain somewhere else about this. This is ridiculous."

She leaves.

The other front office staff employee then says "Didn't she complain about the same thing last week?"

The response from the front office staff employee who dealt with the female customer...

"yes"

MoonCat
03-10-2015, 01:17 AM
So, she wants them to pull an additional handicapped parking spot out of where, exactly???

(Yes, yes, I know the answer, but we all know it doesn't really work that way!)

What did she want you to do? Kick those other customers out? Maybe she should get her ass in gear earlier in the day so she can get to the garage before those other people.

Ironclad Alibi
03-10-2015, 03:10 AM
Was there some reason she couldn't park in a non-handicapped spot?

mathnerd
03-10-2015, 04:52 AM
Was there some reason she couldn't park in a non-handicapped spot?

Probably not the case with this particular person, but if she needs any mobility aids, regular spaces aren't likely to have enough space to get her out of the car. When my youngest son is having a wheelchair day, I absolutely must park in a handicapped spot with the access aisle on the side of the vehicle he's sitting on. If he's having a walker day, handicapped spaces with the access aisle on the wrong side are still large enough, and some regular spaces are large enough, but most aren't. If he's having a good day, and he's walking unassisted, then we can use regular spaces, but sometimes if I park too far away he "runs out of steps", and we suddenly find ourselves having a walker or wheelchair day.

bhskittykatt
03-10-2015, 08:45 PM
We have this happen at work. We have more than we are legally required to, and on busy weekends they fill up (as does the rest of the lot) and someone inevitably comes to complain. And of course they're too cheap to accept our offers to valet their car. :rolleyes:

I've also seen this at our charging station. One guest wanted me to track down the person who had parked their car their to charge it, because he needed to charge his car that very second and how dare someone else be using the station! They needed to move! If it was just a conventional car taking up the charging station parking spot then it would be legit, but the car there before him was also an electric car that was plugged in and using the station first. This guy got into a fit over that. Dude, other people do have electric cars... :rolleyes:

raudf
03-10-2015, 09:52 PM
How is the paid parking lot any different from say, a store's parking lot? Short answer, it's not. It's all first come, first served. Just because you have a handicap tag/placard/plate, doesn't mean a rip in the space-time continuum is going to open up and place a spot just for you.

wolfie
03-11-2015, 02:38 PM
By "reserved", do you mean she had a monthly parking pass, rather than being a "drop-in" paying by the day? If so, why can't they mark one of the handicapped spaces as being reserved for parking pass XXXX?

fireheart
03-12-2015, 01:59 AM
By "reserved", do you mean she had a monthly parking pass, rather than being a "drop-in" paying by the day? If so, why can't they mark one of the handicapped spaces as being reserved for parking pass XXXX?

Probably because there's always that off-chance that someone else who DOES need a disabled park pulls in, finds they're all full, discovers this one reserved spot and absolutely NEEDS to use it, before he then claims discrimination.

snugglegirl05
03-12-2015, 09:18 PM
By "reserved", do you mean she had a monthly parking pass, rather than being a "drop-in" paying by the day? If so, why can't they mark one of the handicapped spaces as being reserved for parking pass XXXX?

I believe she had a handicapped parking pass, not a monthly parking pass.

That is the impression that the office staff got from her.

Sandiercy
03-13-2015, 12:39 PM
Apparently she could park in a regular spot and come complain to you though.

Mytical
03-13-2015, 02:59 PM
As somebody who can legally use handicap parking, I had to facepalm when I read the OP's post. Because see.. if there is no handicap parking available, there is no handicap parking available. I have lost count of the times that I pull into a parking lot, and find no handicap spot available. You want to know what that means? It means I am parking somewhere else, and having to deal with it. Like an adult. Of course I have two caring caregivers who will help me by getting a shopping cart or electric cart if my legs are especially bad that day, but even if I am by myself, I just struggle until I can get to a mobility accessory.

justhere
03-16-2015, 01:24 AM
By "reserved", do you mean she had a monthly parking pass, rather than being a "drop-in" paying by the day? If so, why can't they mark one of the handicapped spaces as being reserved for parking pass XXXX?

I used to work in a major metropolitan city, one of the biggest in the US, and due to the nature of my job, I had to drive to work about 75% of the time. I had a monthly parking pass (paid for by my employer) at the garage closest to our office, but just because I had the pass didn't guarantee that they would have a spot available for me to park in; it meant if they had a spot, it was already paid for. I knew that on certain days of the week, if I got there after a certain point of the day, I ran a high risk of not being able to park. Fortunately, I was able to work my schedule around this (something my boss knew and appreciated), but that was the way it worked. Parking is at a high-premium, and unless someone is willing to pay beaucoup bucks for a designated, reserved spot then, even with a parking pass, it wasn't a guarantee you'd get a spot.

snugglegirl05
03-16-2015, 11:26 PM
I used to work in a major metropolitan city, one of the biggest in the US, and due to the nature of my job, I had to drive to work about 75% of the time. I had a monthly parking pass (paid for by my employer) at the garage closest to our office, but just because I had the pass didn't guarantee that they would have a spot available for me to park in; it meant if they had a spot, it was already paid for. I knew that on certain days of the week, if I got there after a certain point of the day, I ran a high risk of not being able to park. Fortunately, I was able to work my schedule around this (something my boss knew and appreciated), but that was the way it worked. Parking is at a high-premium, and unless someone is willing to pay beau coup bucks for a designated, reserved spot then, even with a parking pass, it wasn't a guarantee you'd get a spot.

Something my direct supervisor told his staff, including me regarding the monthly parking passes that our employer issues to customers....

According to the contract that our employer writes up regarding the monthly parking pass if you buy a pass for non-reserved parking, your pass is good for a non-reserved parking spot. No where in the contract does it state that your pass is good for a non-reserved parking spot located in a specific parking garage.

But clients and customers will get pissy because 1) someone else parked in the non-reserved parking spot that they have been parking in, 2) the garage that they have been parking in has no available non-reserved parking spots since every non-reserved parking spot is full, and so 3) they had to park in a different garage.

One particular client complained about this, and upper management referred them to the section of the contract for each employee. Those employees were transferred to another garage managed by my employer.

wolfie
03-18-2015, 03:23 AM
I had a monthly parking pass (paid for by my employer) at the garage closest to our office, but just because I had the pass didn't guarantee that they would have a spot available for me to park in; it meant if they had a spot, it was already paid for. I knew that on certain days of the week, if I got there after a certain point of the day, I ran a high risk of not being able to park.

In other words, the garage had X spaces, and sold Y monthly parking passes. Despite this, they didn't cut off "drop-ins" once (X-Y) had already arrived (i.e. enough to fill all the spaces not accounted for by monthly parking passes), so that someone could arrive and find that the space THEY PAID FOR was not available. To me, that sounds like fraud - selling more parking spaces than they have available.

Slave to the Phone
03-20-2015, 09:26 PM
I thought I'd put this here so that folks would know that not everyone tries to abuse handicapped spots. I had to go to the mall to pick up one thing a couple of days before Christmas. I already know I'm an idiot for not planning properly, please don't hurt me!

So, I followed a very young looking person driving a car with handicapped plates into the packed parking lot. I know about hidden disabilities so didn't think twice about it until she drove past the open handicapped spots out to the south 40 and parked there. (Did I mention that it was sleeting and just icky outside? Well, yes, it was.) She got out and sprinted for the mall entrance.

I saw her later in the same store I had gone to and commented on how considerate she was to leave the handicapped spots open for people who couldn't run that far. She told me that she was driving her grandmother's car and that if her grandmother learned that she had parked in a handicapped spot she would have been beaten to death with a walker.

wolfie
03-20-2015, 10:13 PM
My understanding is that if a placard is abused by an able-bodied person, it is confiscated EVEN IF THE PERSON TO WHOM IT IS ISSUED IS LEGITIMATELY ELIGIBLE TO HAVE A PLACARD. In this example, if Grandma were a non-driver who relied on family members to drive her around in her own car, the placard can only be used WHEN GRANDMA IS BEING DRIVEN ON ERRANDS. If Scofflaw Grandkid borrows the car for their own purposes, parks in a handicap space because it's convenient, and gets caught, Grandma loses the placard and can't get a new one for a set period of time. In the case of one user here (able-bodied parent with one or more disabled children), they're eligible to get a placard for use when they're transporting the disabled child, but UNLESS THE DISABLED CHILD IS BEING PICKED UP / DROPPED OFF at a given stop, the parent is not permitted to park in the handicap space, and can lose the permit for doing so.

Slave to the Phone
03-20-2015, 10:32 PM
That makes sense, wolfie. Grandma certainly wouldn't want to lose her handicapped plates because her grandkid was a jerk. Maybe that was why the young able-bodied person was threatened with death by a walker beating. Or perhaps Grandma wanted to instill some consideration into a young person. Personally, I would never park in a handicapped spot because that's how my Mom raised me. If there really was no other place for me to park, I'd think that maybe my task/event just wasn't that important and leave.

mathnerd
03-20-2015, 10:45 PM
That's exactly how it's supposed to work, wolfie. I'm allowed to park in a handicapped spot as long as I have the appropriate child with me or I'm picking them up. For example, if I pick one of them up from school I can use the permit, because said child will be coming out of the building with me. My dilemma is making sure I hang the right placard. The only difference is the serial number, so if I only have one of the boys, I have to hang the one that belongs to him. Though if I ever messed that one up, I'd probably get forgiven since both placards are generally in the car.

And yes, the handicapped person can lose the placard if others abuse it, though that rarely happens in practice. There would have to be severe and systematic (and documented) abuse before some official is going to take the heat from revoking permits from grannies.

dalesys
03-20-2015, 10:48 PM
"Kid, I love you dearly. Abuse my handicap sticker and you plus my walker will be a handsome macrame wall hanging."

gerund
03-21-2015, 01:01 AM
My neighbour has a wife in a wheelchair. She cannot walk even one step so he has the placard that shows the wheelchair symbol.

He was taking her to an appointment at the hospital and dropped her at the front door, then went into the parking station and preparing for when he was going to bring her out, parked in a handicapped spot.

Some interfering woman accosted him as he got out.

IW: You don't look handicapped! What do you think you are doing?
N: Don't be silly, I'm blind.
IW: Oh! Sorry!

:roll: (shades of Rutger Hauer in Blind Fury)

mathnerd
03-21-2015, 01:40 AM
People are stupid. I had an old woman verbally berate me for parking in a handicapped spot because I was obviously not handicapped, as evidenced by the fact that I was perfectly capable of lifting my son's wheelchair out of my van. Yes, she actually said that.

Slave to the Phone
03-21-2015, 03:00 AM
Good gawd. Seriously, I have no words for this. Well, I do have a lot of words, but I don't want to get banned for saying them. Can I just say this instead? I'm so sorry that happened to you and I commend you for taking such good care of your children. I'm sure that they are wonderful little people who will grow up to be wonderful big people.

I NEVER judge someone using a handicapped parking spot. There are so many hidden disabilities. Just because someone looks young and healthy doesn't mean that they are. It just means that they LOOK young and healthy.

My mother, who has a legit handicapped license tag will only park in the handicapped spot when she's having a bad day. She once had someone yell at her because she got a prime parking spot in the regular spaces because she shouldn't take those away from "normal" people.

Some people are just jerks.

mathnerd
03-21-2015, 10:16 AM
Thanks sttp. :) My kids are pretty awesome, if I do say so myself. Though they aren't so little anymore. I'm two short months away from the little one becoming a teenager. :eek: The middle kid (the one not affected by the bone disease) towers over me (I'm five foot eight) and the oldest, while shorter than the middle kid, is wise beyond his not quite 16 years. The adults at the gym where he works as an equipment cleaner (when he can...the owners are awesome about working around his bad days) call him the young rabbi, though we aren't jewish, because they think he's wise beyond his years. I'm pretty damned proud of them. :love:

As for the parking nonsense, it just never ends. I'm on my phone so it's tricky to copy/paste a link, but if you look up "Not all nights are in shining armor", on notalwaysright, that's me too.

greensinestro
03-22-2015, 11:03 AM
Was there some reason she couldn't park in a non-handicapped spot?

Yes, because she's special and has to flaunt that to everyone else.

greensinestro
03-22-2015, 11:11 AM
When I was a kid, maybe about thirty-five years ago, I recall the handicapped parking spots, and you normally found perhaps one or two of these at a shopping center. Not to discriminate against handicapped people, but it just seems like more and more people fight over these permits and spots than ever before, and many who use them illegally.

For example, Cracker Barrel restaurants have these spots all in the front row, and you sometimes see people like this fighting with someone else for grabbing "their spot". Places like this just didn't have this problem back then as they do today.

Maybe parking lots need to be redone with wider spots to accommodate everyone, especially people like what's described in this thread.

mhkohne
03-22-2015, 01:55 PM
When I was a kid, maybe about thirty-five years ago, I recall the handicapped parking spots, and you normally found perhaps one or two of these at a shopping center. Not to discriminate against handicapped people, but it just seems like more and more people fight over these permits and spots than ever before, and many who use them illegally.

For example, Cracker Barrel restaurants have these spots all in the front row, and you sometimes see people like this fighting with someone else for grabbing "their spot". Places like this just didn't have this problem back then as they do today.

Maybe parking lots need to be redone with wider spots to accommodate everyone, especially people like what's described in this thread.

Interestingly, I think you'll find this is mostly due to advances in assistive technology. People can get around with problems that used to leave them homebound.

DGoddessChardonnay
03-22-2015, 04:34 PM
Interestingly, I think you'll find this is mostly due to advances in assistive technology. People can get around with problems that used to leave them homebound.

Another factor is that now, the Baby Boomers are advancing in years now and with that advancement comes more health issues. As they are the largest segment of the US population (generation wise) they are finding they are more issues w/mobility than ever before.

Throw in the advancements made in assistance technology and you have more people out and about.;)

dalesys
03-22-2015, 06:08 PM
... Throw in the advancements made in assistance technology and you have more ...
wobblies throwing wobblies ...

(a few of them)

notalwaysright
03-22-2015, 07:03 PM
Another factor is that now, the Baby Boomers are advancing in years now and with that advancement comes more health issues. As they are the largest segment of the US population (generation wise) they are finding they are more issues w/mobility than ever before.

Throw in the advancements made in assistance technology and you have more people out and about.;)

Interesting, I hadn't thought of the first part, about the Baby Boomers, but that totally makes sense. I just thought of the fact that scooters have become more widely available.

Since I have no issues, I tend to park FAR away, even if there are closer spots. I hate the stress of fighting for a "good" spot. I also dislike when people sit behind me with their blinker on waiting for me to back out. Once, at a warehouse store parking lot, a person actually honked at me for not being fast enough! My car was on, but I didn't have it in reverse yet. I promptly turned the car off and just sat there until he left. Anyway, when I was driving my mom around before and after her hip surgery she had disabled tags. It was extremely nice for her, as for a while she was using a walker. We were almost always able to park in a handicapped spot, which I suppose is unusual and we appreciated it a lot.

mathnerd
03-22-2015, 07:40 PM
In addition to the things mentioned above, medical technology is also allowing people who would have died just a few generations ago to survive. For example, babies born very early were given minimal medical support and just allowed to fight it out on their own until relatively recently. It's only been in the last few decades that preemies started surviving at decent rates, and younger and younger preemies even stood a chance. While this is a good thing, the flip side is that the rate of various medical issues and disabilities in these children is higher (sometimes substantially so), than children born at full term. (And before anybody gets out the pitchforks, this is actually a cause near and dear to me. My own children were born at 36, 32 and 24 weeks). The result is more disabled children than there would have been a few generations ago, because the same cohort of children then would have died. Additionally, children and adults with various physical and intellectual disabilities were frequently hidden away in institutions, and were never brought out in public.

The end result is that the percentage of the people going about their lives in public places that have disabilities is significantly higher than it was when the laws regarding the ratio of handicapped/regular parking spots is woefully outdated, since the combination of an aging population, assertive technology and better medical care have substantially increased the number of people with a legitimate need for them.

And none of that even begins to discuss able bodied people abusing the spots.

drjonah
03-22-2015, 10:40 PM
I also dislike when people sit behind me with their blinker on waiting for me to back out. Once, at a warehouse store parking lot, a person actually honked at me for not being fast enough! My car was on, but I didn't have it in reverse yet. I promptly turned the car off and just sat there until he left.

If I see someone 'stalking' my parking spot, I will purposely load my groceries into my car veeeeeeeeeeeeery slowly and then go walk the cart back to the store instead of putting it in one of the corrals :lol:

raudf
03-28-2015, 12:24 AM
What pisses me off is the disabled people who are asses to their fellow handicap spot users. I have, and will continue to, report people who park in the "don't park here" portion of the handicap van parking spots. I don't know how many times I've seen a person needing to drop their mobility scooter be unable to do so because some ass thinks that because the spots around it are taken that must mean it's open to them.

And when I worked at Hel's Mart, I heard of two disabled biddies nearly getting into a fist fight because of them got the closest disabled spot, while the other was still driving up the lane! I say nearly, because I think their purses were closer to making contact than they were, the huge monsters both were. Yes, I am stating that the biddies were amply upholstered and their purses where HUGE CAR EATING CREATIONS in and of themselves.

Sapphire Silk
03-28-2015, 12:59 AM
In other words, the garage had X spaces, and sold Y monthly parking passes. Despite this, they didn't cut off "drop-ins" once (X-Y) had already arrived (i.e. enough to fill all the spaces not accounted for by monthly parking passes), so that someone could arrive and find that the space THEY PAID FOR was not available. To me, that sounds like fraud - selling more parking spaces than they have available.

It's not. You're not buying a designated parking space unless you have a very specific space reserved only for you, meaning you can't park anywhere else. Apartment complexes are sometimes like that; I lived in one for awhile.

But most places you're not buying a designated spot. You're buying a hunting permit.

My understanding is that if a placard is abused by an able-bodied person, it is confiscated EVEN IF THE PERSON TO WHOM IT IS ISSUED IS LEGITIMATELY ELIGIBLE TO HAVE A PLACARD.

Yes, that is correct.

Evil Empryss's husband (the Evil Overlord) has been cornered by people angry that he parked in a regular space next to a handicapped space; she's handicapped and her car has DV plates. One person actually told him he HAD to park in handicapped because he had handicapped plates; his explanation that he could not do that when she was not with him fell on deaf ears.

mathnerd
03-28-2015, 01:39 AM
Evil Empryss's husband (the Evil Overlord) has been cornered by people angry that he parked in a regular space next to a handicapped space; she's handicapped and her car has DV plates. One person actually told him he HAD to park in handicapped because he had handicapped plates; his explanation that he could not do that when she was not with him fell on deaf ears.


I've had that issue as well, though not nearly as often as the "kids can't be disabled" rants. Sometimes you really just can't win.

wolfie
03-29-2015, 02:29 PM
What pisses me off is the disabled people who are asses to their fellow handicap spot users. I have, and will continue to, report people who park in the "don't park here" portion of the handicap van parking spots. I don't know how many times I've seen a person needing to drop their mobility scooter be unable to do so because some ass thinks that because the spots around it are taken that must mean it's open to them.

Don't some of the "fold up against the side of the van" ramps have remote controls? Naturally, when you were coming back to your van, you assumed that nobody would park in the "no parking - needed for ramps" area. Oops - too bad that shiny new Mercedes (WITHOUT a handicap placard, naturally) took a whack from the ramp.:devil:

mathnerd
03-29-2015, 08:02 PM
Don't some of the "fold up against the side of the van" ramps have remote controls? Naturally, when you were coming back to your van, you assumed that nobody would park in the "no parking - needed for ramps" area. Oops - too bad that shiny new Mercedes (WITHOUT a handicap placard, naturally) took a whack from the ramp.:devil:

It was a Lexus, and I didn't even need a ramp to damage it. I just needed the foot rests of the little mathnerd's wheelchair.

Oh, and the driver was right there, telling me if people like me didn't abuse the handicapped spots, he wouldn't have been forced to park in the blue hash area. Yup, loading my wheelchair using kid into a van is definitely abusing those handicapped spots. Those are only for old people, ya know!

dawnfire
03-29-2015, 11:33 PM
It was a Lexus, and I didn't even need a ramp to damage it. I just needed the foot rests of the little mathnerd's wheelchair.

Oh, and the driver was right there, telling me if people like me didn't abuse the handicapped spots, he wouldn't have been forced to park in the blue hash area. Yup, loading my wheelchair using kid into a van is definitely abusing those handicapped spots. Those are only for old people, ya know!

they solved people parking in those areas here by putting in concrete bollards .

gerund
04-01-2015, 12:31 AM
they solved people parking in those areas here by putting in concrete bollards .

One of the shopping centres I go to has one huge metal bollard in the cross-hatched space between the parking areas.

So cars can't park there. But there is a group of obnoxious raffle ticket sellers who are selling tickets in a very large Barbecue. It's on a box trailer and they push it into that cross-hatched area, turning the handicapped spaces into less than normal parking spaces. I have seen one man have to back his car out before his wife could get into the passenger side.

They are ignorant and I have never bought any of their tickets. I would not encourage them that way.

wolfie
04-02-2015, 02:56 AM
Those raffle people need to be reported to both mall management and the police. If they're on the mall property without the consent of mall management (and the consent can be conditional on "you may occupy THIS area", so positioning themselves elsewhere would void the consent) they're trespassing. Whether or not they have consent, handicapped parking and fire lanes are the only parking offenses which are ticketable on private property.

fireheart
04-03-2015, 06:59 AM
I've had that issue as well, though not nearly as often as the "kids can't be disabled" rants. Sometimes you really just can't win.

I do have to wonder about the logic behind the "kids can't be disabled" rants. Do they believe that kids in wheelchairs/needing canes/hearing aids/leashes (if they have a disability and are prone to bolting, as a few do*) grow out of these as they get older?!


Maybe parking lots need to be redone with wider spots to accommodate everyone, especially people like what's described in this thread.

I've found that the people who wind up getting the handicapped spots and don't need them are there because it's convenient. Not because of the width.

Although there have been a number of articles and complaints put forth in the local trash rag that a number of shopping centres need to widen their car spaces because of the number of idiots who back out/sideswipe other cars. I tend to :doh: every. damn. time. Why?

Because I was taught very early on by my driving instructor when I was practicing parking (and this was done in a quiet parking lot near a train station) how to best line up your wheels so you would get a smooth entrance every time. After that, I used to do the "ten-thousand point turn" if I believed I'd accidentally sideswipe someone on my way in. Peeved off those who were waiting, but at least I didn't hit anyone. :D


I saw her later in the same store I had gone to and commented on how considerate she was to leave the handicapped spots open for people who couldn't run that far. She told me that she was driving her grandmother's car and that if her grandmother learned that she had parked in a handicapped spot she would have been beaten to death with a walker.

Good grandmother :yourock: Unless she was well-known in that area too, it's unlikely she would've been caught, so at least the girl had some sense "drilled" into her.

Personally I do not see the appeal or the point in parking so damn close to the front door (handicapped plates aside). For me, it was a great way to sneak in a few extra minutes of exercise :lol: (yes, even for short errands I would do this.)

*-I know it's not just autistic children, from personal experience here. I had a boy with Downs Syndrome in my class as a child who was a sweet kid and for the most part, we saw him as any other child. Then one day he decided to run from the school (this was prior to schools putting giant-ass fences around them to "combat vandalism"). It later turned out that he had managed to run about 3km from the school all the way to the semi-local shopping centre and was found to be lurking in the freezer department. Luckily he had an item of clothing with the school logo on it and was promptly returned to the school. After that, he had reflective strips sewn onto his hat so he could be identified in the schoolyard and the teacher gave him a reward of "bubble wrap" if he lined up with the rest of us in the schoolyard. :lol:

Peppergirl
04-03-2015, 08:14 AM
I know it's a few days old, but lets not veer back into what's fraud and what's not with regard to handicapped spaces. Keep it to the actions of the SC who berated the staff.

Thanks!

2gigch1
04-04-2015, 01:14 AM
Handicapped parking abusers caught - ABC 20/20 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FAi4fWYm7M0).

For your amusement.