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View Full Version : Couponers galore


Aragarthiel
03-24-2015, 04:34 AM
We ran into four different people with coupon binders and carts full of a single item today, and twice we got stuck behind groups of people arguing over who gets the entire stock of a particular item.

I love coupons, but I hate what people do with them. We ended up leaving the store with only half the things we came for because of them.

greensinestro
03-24-2015, 10:44 AM
Sometimes I'll just happily pay whatever the groceries cost. My mother in law is one of the people who finds ways around the rules of using them. If she's in a restaurant, it's one per customer, but actually splits up the bill to use two of them. Pisses me off since I know I would not be allowed to do that.

Aragarthiel
03-24-2015, 02:02 PM
This store has a membership card and they mail coupons out to members occasionally. When we get ours, I notice that the fine print is getting lengthier. "Limit one coupon per customer per transaction per day." My husband spoke with a manager there recently (job searching) and he said the manager mentioned they were trying to get corporate to okay a limit on how many coupon you could use period. At least they're trying though.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
03-24-2015, 03:47 PM
"We reserve the right to limit quantities" is your friend.

notalwaysright
03-24-2015, 09:22 PM
My mom is the type to go to the store with her list and buy everything on it, regardless of price. She's not wealthy, but she's not hurting either. So she considers sale shopping and couponing a waste of her time.

I do use coupons, and pay attention to sales. But I don't like all these blurbs on various news sites (news!?) which are like "how the grocery store is ripping you off!" They try to justify coupon abusing but implying that grocery stores are purposefully inflating prices. Unless things have changed, grocery stores operate on a very small profit margin.

UncleImpy
03-31-2015, 05:44 PM
I'll occasionally use coupons if its on something I already buy, but it seems the general situation is that the coupon tries to convince you to buy something more expensive, where even with the coupon discount, it still doesn't make the item cheaper than the item I usually buy...so most of the time, I don't bother.

Now, I've seen how some of these people manage to combine coupons and discounts to get their groceries for next to nothing. I just...wow. Rather pay full price and spend my time doing something FUN, you know?

Tama
03-31-2015, 06:46 PM
Well if there is a sale on that item, say almond milk, AND there's a coupon, then I'll do it. That is usually the case when I use them. Or it's an item I'd buy anyway.

XCashier
04-04-2015, 02:28 AM
But I don't like all these blurbs on various news sites (news!?) which are like "how the grocery store is ripping you off!" They try to justify coupon abusing but implying that grocery stores are purposefully inflating prices. Unless things have changed, grocery stores operate on a very small profit margin.
QFT. I hate how they make it sound like the store's the villain, like we're a bunch of bloodthirsty pirates out to rob everyone who walks in the door, which in turn makes the customers treat us that way. Those "news" writers can kiss my underpaid arse.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
04-04-2015, 02:31 AM
I do use coupons, and pay attention to sales. But I don't like all these blurbs on various news sites (news!?) which are like "how the grocery store is ripping you off!" They try to justify coupon abusing but implying that grocery stores are purposefully inflating prices. Unless things have changed, grocery stores operate on a very small profit margin.

Well then, good luck finding that non-profit grocery store chain.

WishfulSpirit
04-06-2015, 03:48 AM
Someone needs to convince the "cart full of one item" that they're SPENDING money (not saving money) unless they'd have bought a full cart of one thing already. Maybe some of them would. Maybe some lady who runs an animal shelter needs 25 bags of kitty litter. But I doubt most of those full cart types would have bought that stuff without the coupon. Or maybe it's a "I'll get this so you can't have it, na na nana na" thing?

Irving Patrick Freleigh
04-07-2015, 01:18 AM
Someone needs to convince the "cart full of one item" that they're SPENDING money (not saving money) unless they'd have bought a full cart of one thing already.

Heh, they're not spending money. They may be making it by returning the stuff the next day.

Aragarthiel
04-07-2015, 01:41 AM
It makes me wonder how much couponers spend every month between newspapers, internet/printer paper and ink for online coupons, smartphone apps, and gas trips to every store in a 60 mile radius.

AccountingDrone
04-07-2015, 11:13 AM
Someone needs to convince the "cart full of one item" that they're SPENDING money (not saving money) unless they'd have bought a full cart of one thing already. Maybe some of them would. Maybe some lady who runs an animal shelter needs 25 bags of kitty litter. But I doubt most of those full cart types would have bought that stuff without the coupon. Or maybe it's a "I'll get this so you can't have it, na na nana na" thing?

I admit that we have certain stuff we stock up when we see a good deal, kitty litter being one. Toilet paper, paper towel, pasta and grains [we freeze for 3 days and vacuum-seal into heavier plastic bags and then store. We cycle our foods so in general nothing goes bad :p] certain canned goods. We have a pair of 25 cubic foot freezers [one chest, one upright. Got to love freecycle!] so we can take advantage of good buys in frozen goods, and I have a number of cases of canning jars so we can take advantage of good deals in fruits and veggies too =)

[I have to admit, I *like* canning my own food - being able to tweak a recipe so it is exactly to taste is fun. If I were rich, I would kill for being able to afford a 'gardener' to take care of about 10 acres of garden and orchard so I would just get the produce to play with without having to play in the dirt. Though Rob does like to garden, work leaves him little time to play in the mud. :cry:]

WishfulSpirit
04-11-2015, 03:47 AM
I'd love to be able to do that. Our tiny apartment has no space to store anything. We have to buy in small amounts just to avoid having the clutter gain sentience and kill us in our sleep.

Food Lady
04-11-2015, 04:24 AM
I'm terrible with coupons but I have no problem with people using them, unless they are trying to use them for the wrong items and argue with me. But I think our current policy is to just take them anyway. My boss literally said to me today "Give them whatever they want unless you think they're trying to commit fraud." How do I know they're trying to commit fraud? I can't read minds.

Aragarthiel
04-11-2015, 04:26 AM
I'd love to be able to do that. Our tiny apartment has no space to store anything. We have to buy in small amounts just to avoid having the clutter gain sentience and kill us in our sleep.

I remember seeing on a forum once that one lady was bragging about how her grocery bill was only $30 a month because she bought whole cattle from an organic farm and took it to a butcher who cut it up for her, she had her own garden full of fruits and veggies and made EVERYTHING on her own. Anything she couldn't get, she bought organically from other local farmers. She seemed to have the mindset that EVERYONE had to be JUST LIKE HER. My question was, where do you store all of this? I mean, you have to have a deep freezer (the only way to store an entire cow), and you probably have your own pasta maker, juicer, blender, extra fridge and freezer, and smoker among other things. Not everyone can fit all of those in their home, let alone a 1-bedroom apartment, and in most areas you can forget about a garden. Plus, what's your electric bill for all of those extra appliances? It probably makes up for the low food bill.

On a side note, I recently discovered that my rewards card for the store in the original post holds coupons you can load from online, and some of them can be used up to five times in a transaction.

wolfie
04-11-2015, 04:33 PM
My boss literally said to me today "Give them whatever they want unless you think they're trying to commit fraud." How do I know they're trying to commit fraud? I can't read minds.

You don't need to read minds (which, in the case of customers, would be a useless ability - since it would be like reading a blank piece of paper:D), just the fine print on the coupon. Virtually all the coupons I've seen said that trying to redeem them in a manner other than that expressly printed (i.e. if the coupon said it was for a single 175 gram package of brand X wasabi mesquite flavoured potato chips, trying to redeem it for anything other than a 175 gram package of brand X wasabi mesquite flavoured potato chips) constitutes fraud.

Customer wants to redeem a coupon in a manner you think is fishy? Read the coupon. If the coupon says that the manner in which customer is trying to redeem it constitutes fraud, don't accept the coupon. Boss should be satisfied - after all, HE told you the "unless you think they're trying to commit fraud" exception.:angel:

fireheart
04-12-2015, 08:48 AM
Well then, good luck finding that non-profit grocery store chain.

That's what food co ops are for right? :p (my uni runs one. I never used it, but I could see the appeal)

WishfulSpirit
04-25-2015, 03:00 AM
she had her own garden full of fruits and veggies and made EVERYTHING on her own. Anything she couldn't get, she bought organically from other local farmers. She seemed to have the mindset that EVERYONE had to be JUST LIKE HER.

Ah time snobs. Some of us work two jobs in between caring for disabled family members and don't have TIME to spend all day in the kitchen making everything ourselves, let alone time to garden. If your partner / spouse / husband / whatever makes enough money that you can do that, well and good, but please try to understand how the other half lives.

XCashier
04-25-2015, 11:16 AM
Ah time snobs. Some of us work two jobs in between caring for disabled family members and don't have TIME to spend all day in the kitchen making everything ourselves, let alone time to garden. If your partner / spouse / husband / whatever makes enough money that you can do that, well and good, but please try to understand how the other half lives.
QFT. I would love to be a Happy Homemaker and decorate the home, cook wonderful meals from scratch and have plenty of time for gardening or crafting. Real Life™ dictates otherwise. You have to be born rich or marry rich to be able to do that, and I fit neither qualification. Therefore, husband and I work two jobs each, three during the holidays, to keep our heads above water.

notalwaysright
04-25-2015, 06:52 PM
To be fair, these people might have the time but not the money. I don't at all mean to defend the way they act! Please don't think that. I know these people can get rabid, I was on a self-sufficiency board years ago. (It was actually well run, they banned people like this pretty fast) I was on it because at a different time in my life, I did have the time to do some of these things. I didn't have money, which was why I was trying to do or make things myself. I baked my own bread for over a year, I made soap from scratch, I grew a small amount of things, stuff like that. I loved it, unfortunately now my place is so small it has nearly no counters or storage space. I have less time, because of school, but it's really the space issue with me.

So yeah. Sorry, if it was off topic. It just makes me irritated because I have been a person who makes and grows things, and I would never dream of acting like that.

RootedPhoenix
04-26-2015, 06:57 AM
It's the snobbery that gets to me. DIY everything, or DIY some things, or don't DIY anything. You are the one who knows what you have time and space for.

I love making things, which is good because I cannot work. Making stuff isn't always the absolute best, though. If I worked, I might choose to spend time with my family instead.

And I'd be the one to know best.