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View Full Version : Great way to look for new staff there bud...


fireheart
04-03-2015, 07:19 AM
So I'm currently doing a job hunt while I'm doing temp work for the local correspondence college (I can actually say this since it's based in my current state). I've been applying mostly for administrative roles, receptionist roles and legal receptionist/secretary/assistant roles. I've avoided the job ads that state "must have <x> years experience" or that they're seeking anything above 12 months experience.

One of the ads however, made me giggle and :doh: all at once. It was for a "boutique" law firm that appeared to be quite posh when I checked their website. However, the application was literally this:

I am looking for a person with an outgoing personality who is able to multitask with general administrative duties.

Needless to say, I promptly emailed them asking for more information and did not send them my resume.

On a side note, I wound up sending about 10-15 applications over the last two days. I am expecting a LOT of emails on Tuesday :lol:

Oh and for those who are wondering "Why legal work when you have an anxiety disorder?" I've found that for some odd reason, working in an office is strangely therapeutic. I have not had an anxiety attack at all since I started, despite the fact that my role requires me to actually interact with people regularly. :lol: Also if I play my cards right, I may be able to go for a smaller firm that handles stuff that's not as "reactive". Ironically I applied for a firm that handles child abuse cases...go me :confused:

MrSmiley
04-03-2015, 03:20 PM
Oh and for those who are wondering "Why legal work when you have an anxiety disorder?" I've found that for some odd reason, working in an office is strangely therapeutic. I have not had an anxiety attack at all since I started, despite the fact that my role requires me to actually interact with people regularly.

For some (not all), a great deal of the anxiety comes from having to deal with people on for lack of a better word, "even terms". It can be scary to figure out what to say to break the ice or the next social cue or figure out what a person is expecting in an interaction.

At a job, behind a desk, some of this is "built in" to the role, and doesn't have to be figured out each time. Theoretically one is there to do the office work, discuss office things and communication will be within those boundaries, even with strangers. This for some lowers the anxiety of "general public" quite a bit.

Just an observation.

fireheart
04-03-2015, 10:00 PM
For some (not all), a great deal of the anxiety comes from having to deal with people on for lack of a better word, "even terms". It can be scary to figure out what to say to break the ice or the next social cue or figure out what a person is expecting in an interaction.

At a job, behind a desk, some of this is "built in" to the role, and doesn't have to be figured out each time. Theoretically one is there to do the office work, discuss office things and communication will be within those boundaries, even with strangers. This for some lowers the anxiety of "general public" quite a bit.

Just an observation.

This actually sums it up quite well for me. I think some of it also boils down to the fear of receiving abuse for something that's not my fault per se. Although I believe with some of the firms they focus more on property or similar, so I'm dealing with the general public a little less.
It was because of this that I avoided a mechanic (who were advertising for a receptionist position) despite the fact that he didnt necessarily want experience.

MoonCat
04-04-2015, 02:17 AM
I think the translation of that job goes something like "I need you to do 25 things at once without losing your mind." :D

fireheart
04-04-2015, 02:41 AM
I think the translation of that job goes something like "I need you to do 25 things at once without losing your mind." :D

:lol: so basically childcare?

sstabeler
04-04-2015, 10:11 PM
:lol: so basically childcare?

with some lawyers, the difference is surprisingly small. ( my mother is having to deal with a massive headache with a leasehold extension ( we're the leaseholders) where it looks like the lawyer took her money and did absolutely nothing at all. We recently discovered that the Land Registry hadn't even had the documents filed ( with them, the Land registry did nothign wrong) to make it clear we were the legal tenants now. We found out about this clusterf**k because the solicitor was incompetent/lazy enough to be struck off. (the equivalent over here of being banned from practising law in a particular state.) Yeah, my opinion of lawyers rtaher dropped when I found out about that)

fireheart
04-05-2015, 09:29 AM
Funny you mention solicitors.

Over here, in nearly all states apart from my state (NSW) and Qld, a lawyer can practice as a solicitor and barrister, depending on the area that they want to specialise in. This explains it a bit better. (http://www.foolkit.com.au/sa/public/barristers)

In NSW and Queensland however, you need to choose to specialise as one or the other as there are two separate rolls for each. Only barristers can be selected as Senior Counsel/Queens Counsel which can best be described as "senior lawyers" or very, very, expensive ones :lol: (you have to apply and be chosen to be a QC/SC by the state/federal law society, you cannot just go around calling oneself a QC/SC and charging $10k/day.)

So why is this all relevant you may ask? Well the firm in question (which I've since learned is quite a large one, forcing me to rethink this position) is entirely barristers, with nearly half of them being Senior Counsel/Queens Counsel. (the title of Senior/Queens counsel is just a name difference-some states go by Senior Counsel, others go by Queens Counsel, if you were appointed as such in the past, you can choose tobe either depending on when the change occurred)

You would THINK, with all these barristers, that at least one of them (OR their assistants) would be able to draft a simple job ad! :lol:

WishfulSpirit
04-06-2015, 03:00 AM
You have more power in a law firm. It's hugely expensive to hire a new lawyer (even if they work on contingency, you still have to pay them for paperwork and such) so "you can go elsewhere" actually has some weight. Maybe that's what helps.

fireheart
04-08-2015, 07:16 AM
You have more power in a law firm. It's hugely expensive to hire a new lawyer (even if they work on contingency, you still have to pay them for paperwork and such) so "you can go elsewhere" actually has some weight. Maybe that's what helps.

:lol: I'm thinking more legal secretary than lawyer. But yeah...