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notalwaysright
07-10-2015, 07:53 PM
So I can't remember if I've told this story, but it was several years ago and involved my landlord.

I lived in a one-level triplex, and the landlord/owners were pretty cool. They lived in Alaska, and generally left us tenants alone. There is a huge *however* included. When they did pop down to inspect their properties, they would stay a couple weeks and try to do everything themselves. Or, schedule lots of stuff all at once and not tell us. Yeah, one day I woke up to a freaking tree being taken down about 6' from my window. :eek: But this is a different tale...

Anyways, this was a DIY failure. I get home from work, early as it was slow. What do I do? I boot up my laptop, and turn on the tv. I still had cable tv service at the time. Oh, noes! Nothing works! After doing the whole check the cables, turn everything off, unplug, reconnect, repeat several times, I have the brilliant idea of going outside.

The back yard had a major drainage problem* and the landlord had mentioned some months previously that he intended on putting in a drainage system. Here's what he did! Flew in, called the "Call Before You Dig" number, waited like two seconds and dug anyway. So as I walk outside I see this big trench, I follow it until I see a bunch of cables totally destroyed. As I'm staring at this, who walks up, but the utility guy. We had a moment of mutual WTF? And he said that he got out there really fast, this was early afternoon, and he only got the call in the late morning. They aren't magical creatures who can just pop up at the snap of the fingers. So the landlord had to pay out the nose to get it all fixed, but if he had waited one or two more hours he would have saved all that money.


*A private school had been built behind our triplexes, and they had NOT put in a proper drainage system. Said school fully knew what they had done and gave not one f*ck.

wolfie
07-10-2015, 08:40 PM
A private school had been built behind our triplexes, and they had NOT put in a proper drainage system. Said school fully knew what they had done and gave not one f*ck.

Don't know about your jurisdiction, but around here if you build something that affects runoff on someone else's property, and causes problems for them, you're legally on the hook to fix the problem. If your jurisdiction has similar laws, landlord shouldn't have gone the DIY route, but instead filed suit against the school to force THEM to put in a drainage system.

eltf177
07-10-2015, 08:44 PM
The back yard had a major drainage problem* and the landlord had mentioned some months previously that he intended on putting in a drainage system. Here's what he did! Flew in, called the "Call Before You Dig" number, waited like two seconds and dug anyway. So as I walk outside I see this big trench, I follow it until I see a bunch of cables totally destroyed. As I'm staring at this, who walks up, but the utility guy. We had a moment of mutual WTF? And he said that he got out there really fast, this was early afternoon, and he only got the call in the late morning. They aren't magical creatures who can just pop up at the snap of the fingers. So the landlord had to pay out the nose to get it all fixed, but if he had waited one or two more hours he would have saved all that money.

Get this all the time; either call Miss Utility and don't wait or don't call at all. And if you hit something YOU are responsible and it can cost some big bucks...

A private school had been built behind our triplexes, and they had NOT put in a proper drainage system. Said school fully knew what they had done and gave not one f*ck.

We've got this exact problem right now. Previously empty field now has a house being built on it, and is causing drainage problems to another house down the hill. This rule of "if the lot is 10,000 square feet or less it doesn't require a drainage review" has proven time and again to be a total crock - ANY change affecting drainage or water absorption needs to be carefully looked at.

We may have an issue with water pollution coming up, stay tuned...

notalwaysright
07-11-2015, 01:42 AM
Don't know about your jurisdiction, but around here if you build something that affects runoff on someone else's property, and causes problems for them, you're legally on the hook to fix the problem. If your jurisdiction has similar laws, landlord shouldn't have gone the DIY route, but instead filed suit against the school to force THEM to put in a drainage system.

Well, the school was built before my landlord had bought the building, so it was an existing issue. I have no idea what would be involved with pursuing such a suit, but he chose not to. I wonder if part of the challenge would be because it was a private religious school? I know (money-wise) things are different for those right? I'm aware of how expensive it can be, because funnily enough the place I went to Bible studies at had recently paved their parking lot. They went over the cost thoroughly, and it did include a drainage system.

And they come and spray paint the ground, so why would my landlord not call before he flew out of Alaska? He managed to get down here and also rent a backhoe before thinking of the cables I guess. Eltf, that's so true! And they see the lots as separate, but if many are built on it can cause large issues. There's a huge amount of marshland were I grew up simply because people all build houses messed up the normal way water drained in the whole area. Oh, and even better, the county declared a bunch of it as unsuitable for building, and people (builders?) somehow got that decision thrown out! They built houses there, and bet they all sink into the swamp...

Ironclad Alibi
07-11-2015, 02:51 AM
There's a huge amount of marshland were I grew up simply because people all build houses messed up the normal way water drained in the whole area. Oh, and even better, the county declared a bunch of it as unsuitable for building, and people (builders?) somehow got that decision thrown out! They built houses there, and bet they all sink into the swamp...

Near my home town there is a lake that drains though a sink hole every so often. Years ago after it drained an enterprising builder built several houses on the newly exposed ground. After the lake refilled, there were houses in the middle of the lake.

bhskittykatt
07-11-2015, 01:17 PM
Oh, and even better, the county declared a bunch of it as unsuitable for building, and people (builders?) somehow got that decision thrown out! They built houses there, and bet they all sink into the swamp...

I grew up across the street from a big low field. Every winter/spring, the nearby river would cause a small flood. There was one little high point of land where all the cows would congregate, and we could watch the rancher go out in his little rowboat and one-by-one manage to get them into the boat and row them back to the barn...

That entire field is now a housing development. I always wondered how they managed to fix that drainage....:rolleyes:

Catwoman2965
07-13-2015, 07:01 PM
So I can't remember if I've told this story, but it was several years ago and involved my landlord...

*snip*

Flew in, called the "Call Before You Dig" number, waited like two seconds and dug anyway. So as I walk outside I see this big trench, I follow it until I see a bunch of cables totally destroyed.

I can top that. :) A friend's neighbor was doing something, digging and drilling in his yard. Managed to hit the GAS LINE, causing the entire neighborhood to evacuate, while the gas company came and fixed his stupidity. He apparently thought the "Call before you dig" didn't apply to him. If I recall, he was fined pretty heavily too.

Gilhelmi
07-17-2015, 11:21 AM
Heck, my city just replaced my sidewalks. Not added new ones just tore out the old and put in new. Even then, they still had the common sense to call before you dig.

I swear, I was taught this in middle school.

GOInsanity
07-17-2015, 01:54 PM
To be honest, I had never heard about the call before you dig until we were having some cables run to our house for internet. I was about 28 at the time. So I'm sure there are plenty of people that have no clue about it.

And some of its a bit excessive. I'm not going to call every time I want to put in some flowers. But I'm not stupid enough to think you can dig across an entire yard and not hit anything.

EricKei
07-17-2015, 02:13 PM
Aye -- it's not always obvious to us regular civilians. I really only knew about it because I grew up in New Orleans, where the ground moves of its own accord fairly often; thus, you need to know not only where the pipes where when they were installed, but where they have shifted to NOW, some years later...especially seeing as how natural gas is quite popular there (*BOOM!*) :eek: Thing is, a landlord such as the one the OP was talking about really has no excuse not to know about that sort of thing