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View Full Version : Would this actually work?


Irving Patrick Freleigh
01-08-2016, 12:19 PM
I have a Life Hacks 2016 desk calendar. Today's tip from it:

"Hungry and want a ride home? Go to the local pizza shop, order a pizza to your house, and get a ride home with the driver."

Mind you, I would never do this. Little Caesar's is cheaper.

ReverendBSB
01-08-2016, 01:35 PM
Depends on the stores insurance policies. We would have done it at the stores I managed for a good tip.

drunkenwildmage
01-08-2016, 01:51 PM
Home 30 mins or less!

CyberLurch
01-08-2016, 03:09 PM
I did not allow riders in my vehicles when I was a pizza driver, so no, this 'life hack' wouldn't have worked with me.

The paranoid part of me says 'Danger, Will Robinson!'. First of all, it's glorified hitch hiking - and one only needs to think of all the reasons you're not supposed to pick up hitch hikers to understand what a bad, bad idea this is. What if your rider is planning a robbery? A carjacking? What if you're being led into an ambush? What if that individual is FLEEING a crime scene? You're also left wide-open to threats to accuse you of a crime unless you hand over all your money and valuables - a variation on an old hitch-hiking trap.

Secondly, depending on the insurance and company policy, you might be forbidden to carry passengers anyway. Suppose the rider gets injured? Will YOUR insurance cover it? Probably not.

And in my case, there was a very practical third reason - my delivery vehicle was a small pickup truck. There wasn't room for a passenger AND the hot box/hot bag.

April
01-08-2016, 04:19 PM
I've seen that thrown out there a couple of times. I've never been a delivery driver, but there is no way in hell that I would drive someone home. I would be scared of being assaulted or robbed. Or sued, if I were in an accident and the passenger was injured.

csquared
01-09-2016, 01:01 AM
When I delivered pizzas, we were not allowed to have passengers in our vehicle. As April pointed out, great way to get robbed or sued.

Racket_Man
01-09-2016, 04:17 AM
NO NO NO . This "advice" has enough fails to make it hurt.

1. MOST companies have a no passenger policy (except for training purposes). Would you as a delivery driver really allow a stranger in your car???? I am thinking after 1 second ---robbery setup.
2. This could be considered a livery service which is (until recently think Uber) A HIGH regulated business needing licensing, bonding, special insurance, special drivers license, etc.
3. Insurance --- See #2 especially if an accident occurs (no matter who was at fault)
4. and as we all know a one time exception will turn into an all-the-time thing.


Again NO NO NO. BAD ADVICE

Irving Patrick Freleigh
01-09-2016, 08:49 AM
Yeah, I figured that was full of it from the get-go.

But, it must've worked at least once for somebody to think it was a tip worth passing on.

Zippity Doo
01-09-2016, 07:29 PM
It's a good way for the pizza delivery guy to get murdered.

Slave to the Phone
01-09-2016, 10:05 PM
It worked for me several times when I needed a ride to my sweeties job so I could ride home with him. It probably because I worked in the same strip mall as the pizza delivery drivers and often had smoke breaks with them. They knew me and knew where I worked AND they were taking me to a business. Plus, they knew that I tipped well when I ordered pizza for lunch.

I honestly doubt that they would have done it for anyone that they didn't know.

taxguykarl
01-11-2016, 03:47 PM
I noticed in my insurance renewal package from the lizard, a large font notice that I would not be covered if transporting a passenger for pay.
IOW, I agree that the writer of that hack is full of it.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
01-11-2016, 04:32 PM
Starting to somewhat regret the purchase of this calendar. I thought I'd be getting helpful household tips, not the "how to be a douchebag" playbook. Today's tip:

If you find hair in your food and send it back to the kitchen, heavily salt it to make sure you got a new order.

notalwaysright
01-11-2016, 07:09 PM
Starting to somewhat regret the purchase of this calendar. I thought I'd be getting helpful household tips, not the "how to be a douchebag" playbook. Today's tip:

If you find hair in your food and send it back to the kitchen, heavily salt it to make sure you got a new order.

Eh. I was hoping that the tips in the calender were better than the ones I've read online. They were like "how to save money at Green Mermaid" which I thought sounded promising. I mean, I know there are certain cheaper drinks which are basically the same as more expensive drinks, and I thought the tips would be like "this drink is $1 cheaper and the only difference is the whipped cream!" But they were basically just ways to annoy baristas, and advice to heavily misuse the free milk/cream/sugar.

Kit-Ginevra
01-11-2016, 10:39 PM
Or sensible life hacks like 'if you're buying a TV,wait until the start of February to get a SuperBowl returner' or 'when travelling by rail,buying a ticket from A to B and then a cheapie from B to C is much cheaper than going from A to C'.

Kittish
01-11-2016, 11:10 PM
Starting to somewhat regret the purchase of this calendar. I thought I'd be getting helpful household tips, not the "how to be a douchebag" playbook. Today's tip:

If you find hair in your food and send it back to the kitchen, heavily salt it to make sure you got a new order.

Well, you could look at it as a "How not to be a complete douche" guide, by NOT doing whatever skeezy thing is suggested for that day. This way at least you still get some practical use out of it beyond simply a calendar. And hey, at least a few of the oh so helpful 'suggestions' are bound to be amusing enough to share!

prjkt
01-12-2016, 01:24 AM
Starting to somewhat regret the purchase of this calendar. I thought I'd be getting helpful household tips, not the "how to be a douchebag" playbook. Today's tip:

If you find hair in your food and send it back to the kitchen, heavily salt it to make sure you got a new order.

I don't think that's a douche tip, it's just a way of testing whether you get the same plate back or not...

wolfie
01-12-2016, 01:46 AM
What is a restaurant SUPPOSED to do with food that's sent back due to a hair? Also, how is it handled when the hair doesn't match the server or BOH staff, but does match the customer who sent it back? For example, server is blonde, chef is bald, assistant has short dark hair, customer has long dark hair - and a long dark hair is found in the food.

Racket_Man
01-12-2016, 05:00 AM
Starting to somewhat regret the purchase of this calendar. I thought I'd be getting helpful household tips, not the "how to be a douchebag" playbook. Today's tip:

If you find hair in your food and send it back to the kitchen, heavily salt it to make sure you got a new order.

Realistically speaking that one sounds a little more "doable" as in --- This means that the kitchen will not just take the hair out of your food, wait a few minutes, warm the plate up slightly and send the same plate right back out. This really only works IF you have not eaten anything off your plate.

YES there are places out there that will do just that.

WishfulSpirit
01-12-2016, 06:11 PM
I'd like to add a sensible life hack: if you're new to an area and want to know where to eat, things to do, exc, find a mid-price hotel and ask the front desk staff (only when it isnt busy). We know local attractions you won't find by googling.

BearLeeBadenaugh
01-12-2016, 06:54 PM
Explicitly against the rules for both pizza chains(Dice & Daddy J) I've worked for. Might be allowed at a small shop, depending on circumstances. When I was at the small shop, I wouldn't do it.

In my experience, many drivers don't notify their insurance they're driving for profit. I'd have to dig up the info, but they had a special additional policy for delivery drivers that was pro-rated based on hours. That policy covered me while working, regular insurance took over when I wasn't. I had to pay my insurance monthly at the local agent by giving them my driving log and they'd figure out my bill. One of the things stated with my insurance policy was that I was not allowed to have passengers unless they were co-workers AND we were both on the clock.

MadMike
01-12-2016, 09:44 PM
YES there are places out there that will do just that.

Something like this happened at Friendly's once when I was a kid, and I was there with my parents. I had ordered a plain hamburger. Shortly before the food came out, our server came back and told me that they had put mayo on my burger by accident, and asked if that was OK. Now, there are a lot of foods that I don't like. Some of those, I don't care for them, but I can get them down. Others, I'll start gagging as soon as I taste them. For me, mayo is one of the latter. So naturally, I said it wasn't OK.

When our food came out, it was obvious that they tried to give me the same burger they messed up, as evidenced by the half-assed job they did of wiping off the offending condiment. I didn't want to cause any trouble, but my parents even told me to say something. So I had them make me a new burger.

lordlundar
01-12-2016, 11:38 PM
So this calendar was basically written by opinion advice columnists who have never worked anywhere else and fell asleep during ethics courses?

PLEASE tell me you didn't pay for this crap.

Racket_Man
01-13-2016, 04:02 AM
Explicitly against the rules for both pizza chains(Dice & Daddy J) I've worked for. Might be allowed at a small shop, depending on circumstances. When I was at the small shop, I wouldn't do it.

This is also true of most places. once the customer has touched the food, if it is returned it either gets bagged up and frozen for later examination (say in the case of hair(s) on the food) or chucked directly in the trash.

In my experience, many drivers don't notify their insurance they're driving for profit. I'd have to dig up the info, but they had a special additional policy for delivery drivers that was pro-rated based on hours. That policy covered me while working, regular insurance took over when I wasn't. I had to pay my insurance monthly at the local agent by giving them my driving log and they'd figure out my bill. One of the things stated with my insurance policy was that I was not allowed to have passengers unless they were co-workers AND we were both on the clock.

At least in my state there is ONLY one major insurer that allows pizza delivery using normal ordinary car insurance. ALL other insurers policies have a rider that forbid the owner from using said vehicle in ANY commercial activity. In order to really be legal you have to purchase commercial or business insurance which increase your premimums by 2X to 4X the normal cost. There is one national company that will retroactively cancel (especially if you are involved in an accident your fault or NOT) your policy if it is found you are doing pizza delivery.

I just threw up my hands and got the commercial policy. It still does not cover livery activities.

taxguykarl
01-14-2016, 02:45 PM
Explicitly against the rules for both pizza chains(Dice & Daddy J) I've worked for. Might be allowed at a small shop, depending on circumstances. When I was at the small shop, I wouldn't do it.A Chicagoland chain (one which shares a name with my mother, interestingly) gave my pick up order to someone else and pitched it when the pizza was returned. The SM said that would be a liability issue.

Arcus
04-03-2016, 02:54 AM
I just bought a car to use for work. When I went to get the insurance for it my agent asked if I was "going to be transporting clients" in it. I told her no and she made me sign a paper that stated that I wasn't and that anyone that was paying me for a ride wouldn't be covered while in my car. I thought it was weird at first until I thought about it later and realized why she asked me that.