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Pixelated
05-11-2019, 09:25 PM
Note: not all (as will be obvious) are the fault of lousy management ... this time.

1) Self-checkouts are down. Again.

2) Intra-store phones are behaving erratically. Sometimes they'll let you call a department, sometimes they won't. And sometimes you pick up the handset and get nothing at all.

3) Multiple sick call-outs, including 1 or 2 cashiers (not sure)

4) Repeated lineups due to 3). Head cashier hops onto a register DESPITE THE FACT that Alien Queen is prowling around. (Alien Queen has decreed that Head Cashier are not to be on registers, ever, no matter what)

5) Lunches are an hour or more behind.

6) One coworker took herself off for lunch (this is quite the story in itself), despite the fact she came in around 8 (I think) and I was there at 7 and thus my lunch should've been first (head cashier sent me off for my lunch anyway, with a request to let CW know that HC was none too pleased with her).

7) As I'm going up the stairs to the staff room to fetch my stuff (because I wanted to GTFO of there for lunch), I see Young Coworker sitting midway up the first set of stairs. There's a long-ish set of stairs, then a landing, then a shorter set of stairs before you get to the second floor itself. He's sitting halfway up the long-ish set. Something about him doesn't look right.

Me: "What are you doing?"

YCW: *mumbles*

Me: "What?"

YCW: *mumbles* "... high ..."

After a bit more of this, I finally get the gist of the situation.

No, it's not what you might have deduced from that one word. YCW is a diabetic who relies on insulin and apparently his sugar levels were WAAAAY out of whack. :eek:

Me: "Can I help you get up the stairs? Would water help?" (Yeah, stupid question, like water will do much of anything ... maybe fruit juice ...)

YCW: "No, I'll be okay ..." As it turned out he had given himself some insulin but it didn't seem to be doing much.

Me: "Um, if you can, you might want to move closer to the bottom of the stairs."

YCW: "Yeah ..."

All I could see was him toppling head-first down the staircase.

I got my stuff and went back down the stairs and he was still sitting there, so I reported it to everybody I could find. Alien Queen and Really Great Assistant Manager went off to deal with the situation. YCW had been insisting that he could drive, and we had all been told that we were to keep an eye on the exit doors, and if he came near them we were to tackle him and sit on him (okay, I made that part up). Actually we were supposed to go get Really Great Assistant Manager and let him deal with it. After AQ and RGAM talked to him, they somehow got him back upstairs to the staff room, from whence he called a friend to give him a lift home. When I left at 3 p.m., he looked a lot better ... but he was probably still not in good enough shape to get behind the wheel. I offered to give him a lift home and that was when he told me a friend was coming for him.

8) Second Coworker has medical issues that are not being properly dealt with. He has a doctor's note saying he cannot stand for long periods, nor lift anything heavy, nor do ... well, much of anything ... But they are continually putting him in the position of "loader" or putting him on cash ... A third coworker has received special permission to bring a stool whenever she goes on cash but for some reason this guy hasn't gotten this permission. Somebody suggested it was because Third Coworker came in with a doctor's note that SPECIFICALLY STATED that she MUST have the opportunity to sit if she's on cash. Apparently "must not stand for long periods of time" is too vague for the Powers That Be.

I know yet another coworker also brought in a doctor's note saying she's not to stand for more than 5 hours at a time (hence: SHORT SHIFTS, PLEASE) and yet they have started putting her back on 7- and 8-hour shifts.

So yeah, that was another day in Clusterfuck Central.

One bright note: I'd been scheduled for The Dead Zone (which isn't quite so dead these days, but still ....) I'd been there maybe half an hour when yet another coworker (not any of the above ones) called me on the intrastore phone (presumably before they all decided to go wonky) and asked if I'd like to trade places. Reason? She has allergies and there are massive displays of flowers right up by the front registers.

You betcha, lady. Any. Fucking. Time.

And when I got home I found a message from Big Grocery Store wanting to do a phone interview with me. I have no idea whether it'll be a better environment than Clusterfuck Central, but I'm willing to chance it. Last time I applied to one of their stores they told me that, because the stores are unionized, I would start out with only 8 hours a week. Back then I said I was hoping for more hours. Now I'm thinking "Fine by me." I have other ideas that I'd like to get moving on and this would give me both the time and incentive to do so.

Victory Sabre
05-12-2019, 12:44 AM
Wow!

Your work is like the gift that keeps giving, just like Mexican water.

Pixelated
05-12-2019, 01:12 AM
Wow!

Your work is like the gift that keeps giving, just like Mexican water.

:lol::lol: I know! Sometimes I'm sorry that I'm actually looking for another job!

EricKei
05-12-2019, 01:51 AM
Maybe 2nd CW (the one who can't stand for long) should look into Disability if it's preventing him from working (i.e. if this would prevent him from working 20 hours at a desk job). o_O I have a more severe version of that (I cannot stand for more than 15-30 mins, and even then, I need to lean; nor walk for more than 10 w/o leaning on a cane/grocery basket/etc; nor lift heavy stuff. Between that and (required) meds that compound the issues, I was afraid of even applying to a retail job while I was trying to get SSI/Dis (took 5 years but I got it, now retired), as I knew from experience that most places would pull that same crap on me, sooner or later, whether intentionally or not.

MoonCat
05-12-2019, 02:06 AM
If the diabetic guy took insulin, I don't think fruit juice would help. That would add sugar to his system. But I'm not on insulin (yet?) so maybe someone who is could shed more light on this?

Tama
05-12-2019, 03:19 AM
He might have been trying to say he needed to get his sugar higher?

Kristev
05-12-2019, 03:27 AM
When your blood sugar is high, exercise might help a little bit. But really, you have to sit around and wait for your insulin to kick in. There isn't a good way to force blood glucose down quickly except for fast-acting insulin, which you must take with a meal or you will crash (meaning you will go too low).

Water is okayish, but when your sugars are high, one of the hallmark signs of that is constant urination. So water may help you stay hydrated, but you're just as likely to lose whatever you drink shortly after you drink it.

When your sugar is high, yes, juice is to be avoided. Only water or diet soda, which doesn't use sugar and won't phase your sugars except in large amount, should be given. Any food, anything sugary especially, will only make things worse. And juice is extremely sugary.

On the other hand, if you are running too low, juice and/or cheese are good things to get. A regular soda or a candy bar will work, too. But you'll need to get some real protein shortly after that, because those things will get you there, but they may not keep you there. Protein will.

And by the way, if someone is low on the sugar scale, the symptoms tend to be rather clear. They get dizzy, they get hostile, they get a killer headache, they usually lose all interest in food. Shaking also happens, slowly at first, but eventually increasing as the brain becomes increasingly desperate for glucose. Low blood sugar is more dangerous than high because it can kill you fast. You see, glucose, sugar in the blood, is the only fuel the brain can actually function on. Low blood sugar deprives the brain, and if it's allowed to continue, can do permanent damage.

As with high blood sugar, it goes the other way. High blood sugar is dangerous, too, but the damage is very, very slow. It goes after your organs. Heart, eyes, a number of systems, all taking prolonged damage from blood sugar states. But you won't die in a day unless you hit 600.
With high blood sugar, expect to see lethargy and a growing sense of hunger, as your body starts demanding food for energy despite the fact that your mind knows this is exactly the wrong thing to do. High blood sugar can make you feel drunk. It will also make you extremely thirsty, and make you urinate a practical ocean. And that's no exaggeration. Blurred vision and itchy skin also manifest with high blood sugar states.

Pixelated
05-12-2019, 03:43 AM
I am myself diabetic but on metformin so ... I know diddly/squat about insulin.

I'm not entirely clear whether his sugar was too high or too low. Because he'd given himself a shot of insulin, I'm inclined to think it was too high.

BUT ... Kristev's list of symptoms is interesting, because somebody said they'd seen him looking visibly shaky earlier. So that sounds more like LOW blood sugar ... Tama might be right and he might have been saying he needed to get his blood sugar higher ... ?

At any rate, he did seem to be quite improved at the time I left, so hopefully his friend came and got him and he went home to recuperate.

EricKei: CW who can't stand for long periods of time is in fact talking to an insurance company, not sure why but I know he is. He has told them point-blank about his workplace not cooperating, so we'll see if that goes anywhere.

csquared
05-12-2019, 01:45 PM
Sounds like low blood sugar.

Most insulin using diabetics that I know, carry a candy bar or fruit juice with them, for just that reason.

Buzzard
05-12-2019, 04:15 PM
Or glucose tablets. Cheapest source of fast glucose I know of that doesn't involve diving into a bag of pure sugar. They come in handy tubes (refillable) and can't melt.

As for how to handle a diabetic who's completely incoherent (and you don't have a meter handy): Bet on low and treat accordingly. Short term, the higher blood sugar won't likely kill the guy and can be treated when the pros get involved, but an extra low...

As for how much to administer, it doesn't necessarily take much, but there is a time lag between ingestion and actual blood sugar rise. A cup (8oz) of juice, soda, etc will most likely have enough to pull one out of hazard, if not back to some sort of coherence.

Obligatory disclaimer: I am not any sort of medical professional, just a diabetic who's on insulin, passing on what I've learned.

TheSHAD0W
05-12-2019, 05:50 PM
Or glucose tablets. Cheapest source of fast glucose I know of that doesn't involve diving into a bag of pure sugar.
I use Life Savers in an Altoids tin; haven't compared absorption rate with the pills, but they seem effective enough.

Mental_Mouse
05-12-2019, 08:49 PM
I use Life Savers in an Altoids tin; haven't compared absorption rate with the pills, but they seem effective enough.

Not a diabetic myself (but I do have issues with low blood sugar); My issue with life savers would be that they're not as chewable as tablets or various other candies. (And I can't really suck them without chewing.)

EricKei
05-12-2019, 09:19 PM
It's my understanding that, if the diabetic person cannot communicate clearly, that smelling their breath MAY help -- supposedly, between high and low sugar, one makes your breath smell like fruit, and the other, like nail polish...? Kristev, any thoughts?


As for me: I'm technically considered "pre-diabetic," (which may also be the case for others who need to control their sugar but NOT on insulin). I take Metformin, Farxiga, and Bydureon, which (along with some dietary changes) have been doing the trick thus far (*knock on wood*). I've had the low sugar reaction a couple of times of which I'm aware. Legs turned to jelly, had to support myself on furniture to get to my bed (which was very close both times, fortunately), collapsed into bed and promptly had what I can only describe as a mild seizure. Not fun.

TheSHAD0W
05-13-2019, 02:11 AM
My issue with life savers would be that they're not as chewable as tablets or various other candies.
Dunno, I find them crunchy. :-) The hard candy also lasts longer under harsh conditions... like sitting in the glove compartment of my car.

Kristev
05-13-2019, 06:19 PM
The nail polish thing, I've never heard of. It's possible. But overly sweet, fruity breath does indeed indicate high blood sugar. Extremely high, as in you're in danger of ketoacidosis level high.

Ketoacidosis turns a type two diabetic into a type one. Only insulin will help you then, and sometimes, not even that.

Ironclad Alibi
05-13-2019, 06:54 PM
Dunno, I find them crunchy. :-) The hard candy also lasts longer under harsh conditions... like sitting in the glove compartment of my car.

Not to mention the extra fiber you get when the paper wrapper becomes glued to the candy and you can't get all of it off. Which usually happens to me with individually wrapped cough drops.

TheSHAD0W
05-14-2019, 02:51 AM
Not to mention the extra fiber you get when the paper wrapper becomes glued to the candy and you can't get all of it off.
Yup, but they sell Life Savers in baggies full of individual plastic pouches now, which is perfect for my use.

ladyjaneinmd
05-14-2019, 12:25 PM
When your blood sugar is high, exercise might help a little bit. But really, you have to sit around and wait for your insulin to kick in. There isn't a good way to force blood glucose down quickly except for fast-acting insulin, which you must take with a meal or you will crash (meaning you will go too low).


*mod snip*

Totally EXCELLENT descriptions, Kristev. I've been diabetic for 25 years now, but one thing you didn't mention - high blood sugar over a long period of time also causes a hair-trigger temper. I nearly got fired from a job because of that, once. Shortly after that temper tantrum, I ended up in the hospital, and on insulin. Nowadays I'm a lot more stable.

ladyjaneinmd
05-14-2019, 02:38 PM
Dunno, I find them crunchy. :-) The hard candy also lasts longer under harsh conditions... like sitting in the glove compartment of my car.

I find it best for me to keep a candy in my purse, but it has to be a candy that I don't like enough to want to eat it unless I need it.
Hard to explain, but it works for me.

greek_jester
05-17-2019, 07:35 AM
My late mum used to keep a bottle of Lucozade in her handbag. She couldn't swallow anything solid if she got bad, but liquid would go down, and the glucose helped enough for her to be able to eat something more appropriate.

Kristev
05-17-2019, 10:36 PM
Ladyjaneinmd, I never knew that. But it does explain a lot.