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Pixelated
06-09-2019, 04:35 AM
Another story from the Lawn and Garden section.

Older man asks about a sack of potting soil. He wanted to know the price and I couldn't find it in our supposedly handy-dandy product book.

So I broke the rules :eek: and went to the back of the gardening area to get the price. It was far enough that I wasn't sure the scan gun (one of the clunky old ones) would work. I didn't want to have to scan, run back to the register, and then realize nothing had happened, so ... I picked up one of the bags (it's listed as 28.3L; no idea what that converts to), hoisted it over my shoulder, and headed back to the register.

Behind me ... incoherent babbling.

"Oh my goodness ... good heavens ... you didn't have to do that ... ay yi yi yi yi!!!" :roll:

The man grabbed another sack and followed me to the register. I don't know why, because once he learned the price, he grabbed a wagon, put the two bags on it, and went back to get four more. :D

TheSHAD0W
06-09-2019, 05:34 PM
>28.3L

That's a measure of volume, not of weight. If it were water that'd be 28.3 kilograms, a bit over 60 lbs. Soil isn't as dense as water so I'd guess around 20 kg or 45 lbs.

Pixelated
06-10-2019, 03:27 AM
I don't know why they're using "litres" for something solid ... I tried to get a conversion chart online and it kept wanting to treat it as if it was a liquid.

Nunavut Pants
06-10-2019, 04:24 AM
Solids can have volume, too... Maybe it's a good measure for something that doesn't have a consistent density.

Mental_Mouse
06-10-2019, 10:57 AM
Solids can have volume, too... Maybe it's a good measure for something that doesn't have a consistent density.

Also when you're laying out soil, you're generally trying to fill a volume, say filling a hole of given size.

mjr
06-10-2019, 01:10 PM
Also when you're laying out soil, you're generally trying to fill a volume, say filling a hole of given size.

True, but if you were filling volume for a hole, and using metric, wouldn't you calculate the volume in cubic centimeters (or cubic meters, depending on the size of the hole)?

Edwina
06-10-2019, 01:42 PM
The bigger pots that i use are all labeled with how many liters they hold so having bags of soil labeled with liters helps me know how many I need to buy when I repot my jungle of chili’s.

Nunavut Pants
06-10-2019, 04:27 PM
True, but if you were filling volume for a hole, and using metric, wouldn't you calculate the volume in cubic centimeters (or cubic meters, depending on the size of the hole)?

What do you think that 1000 cubic centimeters is???

Here's a hint... (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Litre)

csquared
06-10-2019, 08:36 PM
Cubic centimeter = milliliter.
If water, it is one gram weight.

Meters to liters to grams...

Jetfire
06-11-2019, 02:50 PM
I've been filling my deck planters for my annual garden, and noticed once again how soil up here is sold in Litres for some reason. Ultimately it doesn't really matter to me, since I know 60L will fill 3 of my planters, but it is a bit strange to sell it that way.

Doing a quick google shows some people have wondered that, but there is no real answer.

Mental_Mouse
06-11-2019, 05:59 PM
True, but if you were filling volume for a hole, and using metric, wouldn't you calculate the volume in cubic centimeters (or cubic meters, depending on the size of the hole)?

Or in liters, which nicely split the difference between batches you need a measuring scoop for, and batches you need a forklift for.