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View Full Version : Ever gotten anything larger than a $100 bill?


alphaboi
08-09-2006, 11:07 PM
Anyone who's worked a register has gotten people try to pay for small orders with $50 or $100 bills, but has anyone gotten anything larger? It's been decades since they were last printed, but they're still legal tender. In over 5 years of retail I've never had it happen. One time though we did get a memo from corporate saying a store accepted a $500 bill, and we were not to accept them.

toolbert
08-09-2006, 11:23 PM
i've never seen them higher than $100 anywhere. I have been offered Australian dollars for real ones (like I wouldn't notice >.>), but I think it was hopefully a joke. On a side note, why does American money look like crap and all these other countries have such cool looking money?

Gurndigarn
08-10-2006, 12:24 AM
Anyone who's worked a register has gotten people try to pay for small orders with $50 or $100 bills, but has anyone gotten anything larger? It's been decades since they were last printed, but they're still legal tender. In over 5 years of retail I've never had it happen. One time though we did get a memo from corporate saying a store accepted a $500 bill, and we were not to accept them.

$100s are the largest in common circulation (USA), and anything larger is probably counterfeit.

Some idiot tried to cash a million dollar bill at a bank, though. Had the picture of Mr. George W. Bush on it. Now, whether or not you're a fan of the Dub (And NO, please don't start debating it!), in the US, it's considered tacky to put living people on money. We're supposed to wait until their dead and can't embarrass us any more.

Crosshair
08-10-2006, 06:40 AM
We had someone accept a $1 with pieces of a $50 taped onto it at Sears when I worked there. I heard that the local Best Buy accepted $800 in counterfit $100 bills once. They accepted them because they passed the "pen test". From people I talk to, Best Buy gets scammed on counterfits quite often and doesn't seem to do anything other than use the easily fooled "pen test".

kebable
08-10-2006, 09:46 AM
What 'Pen test' ?:confused:


Is this the same 'pen test' women can use to see if their (.)(.) are sagging..... ?

symposes
08-10-2006, 10:40 AM
Iodine Pen.
Normal money will mark i think light brown
counterfeit will mark dark brown, almost black.

It only works because the paper that money is printed on has no startch in it for the iodine to react to.
Cheap paper is full of startch. However if you buy the really expensive high quality paper, it will have little to no startch in it. hence the pen test can be fooled.

Bella_Vixen
08-10-2006, 01:45 PM
They are still legal tender, but any sane person would keep it locked in a bank box or something rather then spend it.

BTW, if anyone sees a $3 bill, let me know. :lol:

Mixed Bag
08-10-2006, 02:36 PM
a $1 with pieces of a $50 taped onto it

What pieces? Were the rest somehow of any value to make it worth cutting up? :confused: :wtf:

(I guess if only the corners were moved from the $50 to the single, the remainder, if in excess of 60% of the original bill, could be traded in at a bank for $50. I heard that was the law, and that no value was given for less than 40%, and half value in between.)

XCashier
08-10-2006, 02:36 PM
Iodine Pen.
Normal money will mark i think light brown
counterfeit will mark dark brown, almost black.

It only works because the paper that money is printed on has no startch in it for the iodine to react to.
Cheap paper is full of startch. However if you buy the really expensive high quality paper, it will have little to no startch in it. hence the pen test can be fooled.
The iodine pens are nearly useless for testing money. Most counterfeiters aren't stupid enough to use cheap paper. It's best to check for watermarks, raised print, etc. http://www.secretservice.gov/know_your_money.shtml

lordlundar
08-10-2006, 03:47 PM
I have been offered Australian dollars for real ones (like I wouldn't notice >.>),

Umm, we don't have any austrailians visiting, do we?:o

Trayol
08-10-2006, 03:53 PM
Slightly :ot: but when I cashier at my job, people would pay with the older versions of now "counterfiet-proof" bills. To me, $100 bills always had big heads and to see one with a small one astounded me.

The pen test said it was real, so good enough.

Crosshair
08-10-2006, 03:59 PM
(I guess if only the corners were moved from the $50 to the single, the remainder, if in excess of 60% of the original bill, could be traded in at a bank for $50. I heard that was the law, and that no value was given for less than 40%, and half value in between.)
That is how you do it. Actualy, don't do it cause the police and Secret Service will not be ammused. If it is more than 50% of the bill you get full value, anything less than 50% and it is worth nothing.

XCashier
08-10-2006, 05:41 PM
We had someone accept a $1 with pieces of a $50 taped onto it at Sears when I worked there. I heard that the local Best Buy accepted $800 in counterfit $100 bills once. They accepted them because they passed the "pen test".

Those are referred to as "raised notes" and are an old counterfeiter's trick. I've had previous employers accept those, as well, though I've never had one pass through my till. http://www.secretservice.gov/money_raised_notes.shtml

Spiffy McMoron
08-10-2006, 05:49 PM
I've never seen anything bigger than a $100, although Canada did produce a $1000 bill up until about 5 years ago. It was discontinued, mostly because it was tempting for counterfeiters to make them, never was accepted by the general population (how often do you carry around a $1000?), and mostly was used for intra-bank transfers.

I tried to get one, as I had to withdraw $1100 for some reason or another. Rather than carrying around all of the $100 that they gave me, I asked if they had a $1000 bill instead. (I don't like carrying around a large number of bills) Unfortunately, they didn't have one at the time, and I'm not sure how common they were.

EDIT: I don't know when the $1000 bill will be replaced with a $1000 coin. :p

Banrion
08-10-2006, 05:49 PM
That is how you do it. Actualy, don't do it cause the police and Secret Service will not be ammused. If it is more than 50% of the bill you get full value, anything less than 50% and it is worth nothing.

It's actually changed a bit, unless we are both right and it was just explained to me differently. What I have been trained, is that you must have at least 1 complete serial number and at least one digit of the second serial number for a bank to honor a damaged bill.

ETA: Just measured. On an old style bill you must have 65.3% intact according to the way I was taught, and 67.3% of the new bills.

Mr. Rude
08-10-2006, 05:51 PM
I did take payment with a $1000 bill once. From a japanese tour group guide in Banff. And yes I checked that puppy thoroughly ;)

Monica
08-11-2006, 04:55 AM
I had a co-worker almost refuse a $2.00 bill, because she had never seen one before.

I get those once in a while.

Kiwi
08-11-2006, 05:22 AM
hehe in kiwi land we have plastic money

thats right, its not paper, its ACUTALLY plastic

*giggles at her countries strange money*

TNT
08-11-2006, 08:40 AM
I've seen a lot of counterfeit money on display and more than a few $20s in the wild... I've yet to see one that even remotely looks real. US money has an incredible amount of detail in it -- check out the eyes on the portraits sometime, or they way you can read the names of the states engraved on the Lincoln Memorial ($5 bill). If you look closely at a bill and you're not impressed with the amount of detail, it's phony. I'm sure there are master counterfeiters in the world who can come close, but they're unlikely to be buying cigarettes with fake $20s at the local convenience store.

JustADude
08-11-2006, 01:56 PM
hehe in kiwi land we have plastic money

thats right, its not paper, its ACUTALLY plastic

Well, that'll solve the 'wallet in the wash' problem real quick. Betcha that's why they made it like that, too!

thegiraffe
08-11-2006, 02:19 PM
We had someone accept a $1 with pieces of a $50 taped onto it at Sears when I worked there. I heard that the local Best Buy accepted $800 in counterfit $100 bills once. They accepted them because they passed the "pen test". From people I talk to, Best Buy gets scammed on counterfits quite often and doesn't seem to do anything other than use the easily fooled "pen test".


Cashiers where I work live and die by the pen test. They won't listen to me that:
(a) it isn't accurate
(b) it takes more time
(c) the watermark is SO much more accurate and less time consuming.

There's also the feel of money. In the 4 years I've cashiered, I'm sure I've held several million dollars. I know what money feels like. I've never had a counterfeit, but I'm pretty sure I'd catch one if I had one. I check anything over a $20, and I feel $20s. The stupid pen is just a tangible thing, it doesn't do much though.

Gurndigarn
08-11-2006, 07:37 PM
Well, that'll solve the 'wallet in the wash' problem real quick. Betcha that's why they made it like that, too!

It's really because it lasts longer than paper and harder to counterfeit.

air914
08-11-2006, 07:55 PM
I don't think I've ever come across a bill large than $100 - although that was this annoying woman (a pretty famous basketball coach's wife) who came through the coffee drive-thru at 6am and gave me $100 for her $4.00 of coffee.... yeah cause I have that amoutn of change in my till - would you like 20 $1, and 10 $5s, etc??? Clear out my till thanks! She even though she was "entitled" to special treatment of us taking her $100 bill (we didn't take them normally) b/c she's this guy's wife. WHATEVER!!! I HATED when people would do that.

When the money changed (colors/images) it was always funny to hand it to people b/c they would give you a look like "is this monopoly money"? I've also given people $2 and $.50 pieces and had them look at me like I was trying to pull something.......

Mark Healey
08-13-2006, 03:02 PM
I did take payment with a $1000 bill once. From a japanese tour group guide in Banff. And yes I checked that puppy thoroughly ;)

You should have found a way to buy it from the till. Collectors will pay quite a bit more than $1000 for them.

Ree
08-13-2006, 06:03 PM
I've had sales for large ticket items such as lawn tractors or a complete bathroom or kitchen reno, where the customer paid cash with $1000 bills. It was obvious they had just come from the bank with them.
I don't believe the Canadian banks issue that size of bill any more, though.
I think $100 is the highest that the Canadian currency goes, now.

amarisse
08-13-2006, 07:10 PM
someone was passing counterfiet $500 where i work. i never have seen a $500 i dont even know if $500 REALLY exist.

Seanette
08-13-2006, 07:33 PM
someone was passing counterfiet $500 where i work. i never have seen a $500 i dont even know if $500 REALLY exist.
According to my research, which ranged from Wikipedia (I don't consider this source entirely reliable, due to the "any random bozo can edit an article" factor) to the United States Treasury's Web site, the last time the $500 was produced in the US was in 1945, and they were officially discontinued in 1969, along with anything larger. They are still legal tender (although I suspect even a bank would have qualms about taking one), but generally held by collectors, not being circulated.
Of course, before I researched this question, I should have probably been clear on which country you're in. :D

Ringtail Z28
08-13-2006, 07:44 PM
I used to get a lot of pesos that were over $100, I don't think that counts though.

Banrion
08-13-2006, 11:51 PM
They are still legal tender (although I suspect even a bank would have qualms about taking one), but generally held by collectors, not being circulated.
Of course, before I researched this question, I should have probably been clear on which country you're in. :D

A bank will verify its validity and promptly shred it. (Also from the US Treasury site)

volvodrivincashier
08-14-2006, 06:34 PM
The iodine pens are nearly useless for testing money. Most counterfeiters aren't stupid enough to use cheap paper. It's best to check for watermarks, raised print, etc. http://www.secretservice.gov/know_your_money.shtml

Lot of stuff I never knew or thought to look for on that page, thanks for the link!

Jayn_Newell
08-14-2006, 09:03 PM
I've never taken in anything larger than $100 before (although I did take in 36 of them once). Most people pay with checks anyways.

Imogene
08-15-2006, 05:49 AM
Slightly :ot: but when I cashier at my job, people would pay with the older versions of now "counterfiet-proof" bills.
However, every time the government releases a new 'counterfeit' bill, you get the influx of people with that other, less-known, equally-as-insipid, joke:
"It looks like Monopoly money to me."
M: -No, sir, not unless the US Mint has suddenly started printing Milton Bradley on all the money.
-Nope, not unless it's gotten starched a few hundred times.
-Nope, Monopoly is entirely monochromatic in any denomination.
-Nope, Monopoly has trains in the portrait.
-etc.

Becks
08-15-2006, 03:18 PM
Kind of off topic, but those new bills they put out look kinda like foodstamps, in my opinion...

Broomjockey
08-15-2006, 06:58 PM
Thanks to this thread, I had a dream last night that as I was shopping, I walked near the checkouts, and saw a lady get handed a $500 bill as part of her CHANGE. (It looked a lot like a $50, but there were clearly extra 0's. I guess my imagination was feeling lazy at the time.)

XCashier
08-15-2006, 07:29 PM
I like the new multi-colored bills. It makes it easier to tell the denominations apart (very handy for international tourists and recent immigrants), much more difficult to pull the "raised note" trick, and I think they're kind of pretty. :) The mint should have done that years ago.

HYHYBT
08-19-2006, 05:56 AM
On the corners scam: you can tear one corner off of each of four large bills. Paper money gets damaged all the time. Just don't spend all the real ones in the same place.

I've never seen one like that either, except one the bank has framed to show people.

I only heard the "Monopoly money" comment with the uncolored "new" designs. The NEW new bills, so far only $10's, $20's, and $50's, no one's said that about. The treasury really missed an opportunity, too: they got the 20's the right color (green), but then the 50's were red instead of blue, and now the tens are orange rather than yellow. If you're *going* to make Monopoly money, at least get it right!

Actually, the tens are the same color as any other money that's been dropped in the mud, then rinsed out. Very attractive :rolleyes:

counterjockey
08-31-2006, 10:06 PM
I've heard the "monopoly money" comment a few times. Never used it myself though. My line, when the new 20s and 10s came out, was "They gave Andrew Jackson/Alexander Hamilton one of them gay makeovers."

I mean, really. Anymore Jackson looks kinda, well, y'know...I didn't know they did highlights or had blowdryers back in the 1820s.

Tejas
08-31-2006, 11:27 PM
It's really because it lasts longer than paper and harder to counterfeit.

and it's an aussie invetion to boot.
in australia we make money (both notes and coins) for varius south pacific countries who don't have the equipment to do it themselvs

Crosshair
09-01-2006, 04:38 AM
It's really because it lasts longer than paper and harder to counterfeit.
The key is HARDER. Once it becomes worthwile to counterfit, it will be done. It will actialy be easier since the plastic it is "printed" on is almost the same stuff you use for overhead projectors (Friend brought some of your funny money home.) and of couse you can get printers to make overheads. The good old paper we use in the US is still the hardest thing to make and fake. I'm sure someone who wanted to could make a passable bill.

Asarelah
09-02-2006, 04:35 AM
We had a 20$ bill with a watermark that was off-center. I argued with my manager about it, but he insisted that it was kosher because it passed the pen test. I'm going to have to tell him about the starch thing.

Jpurple
09-02-2006, 03:06 PM
I see bills of 1000 all the time... then again, I carry Thai baht in my wallet and can spend 2-3000 baht on a basic grocery shop! Thai bills are actually very similar in colour to Canadian bills- especially the 20s and 50s. When I went back to Canada for Christmas, I forgot to take all the Thai money out of my purse and really confused a poor cashier with a 20 Baht note instead of a $20 bill!
There has actually been discussion about Thailand making a bill larger than 1000 B because of the value of the baht and the prices of things.

Crosshair
09-03-2006, 12:22 AM
There has actually been discussion about Thailand making a bill larger than 1000 B because of the value of the baht and the prices of things.
Would it not be easier to simply design new bills and exchange them 100 old baht = 1 new baht. Then after a certian date the old bills loose their value? Just asking.

Gurndigarn
09-03-2006, 12:53 AM
Would it not be easier to simply design new bills and exchange them 100 old baht = 1 new baht. Then after a certian date the old bills loose their value? Just asking.

Revaluing currency has happened in a lot of countries, including (if you want to count midevil times) in the UK. But if you can avoid it (IE, inflation's under 10% regularly), it's usually a good idea, just because it lets everyone who didn't know before that your money's generally worthless.

lordlundar
09-03-2006, 05:40 PM
Revaluing currency has happened in a lot of countries, including (if you want to count midevil times) in the UK. But if you can avoid it (IE, inflation's under 10% regularly), it's usually a good idea, just because it lets everyone who didn't know before that your money's generally worthless.

Germany between the world wars is the biggest example. They introduced the Rentenmark temporarily and the reichsmark to replace the Papiermark. The marks were of so low value that it took a full wagon of them just to buy a candy. The replacement rate was one trillion PM to one Rentenmark.:eek: Even collectors these days only have them for historical purposes more than anything.

In the past 90 years , germany has changed it's currency several times.

1914 - Mark > Papiermark
1924 - Papiermark > Rentenmark > reichsmark
1948 - reichsmark > Deutsche Mark (west) + Mark (east)
1990 - Mark (east) > Deutsche Mark (unified)
1999 - Deutsche Mark > euro

Anakah
09-08-2006, 11:02 AM
I didn't know there was anything higher than $100 bill unless it's a poker chip. I've seen 1,000 and 5,000 pokers chips but not paper money. I've cashed out over 10,000 in pink chips--which are $500. I work in a Casino Cage.
I've accidentally accepted a counterfeit $20 before. It's hard to know whats real and what's not. We don't even have pens up there. I only figured it out because of how strange it felt.

repsac
09-14-2006, 12:24 AM
I collect old money (or did. I've not done so recently) and I know that there are 1000 dollar bills floating around. They're rare, but if you find one it has Grover Cleveland on the front. They were last minted in 1934, but most stayed in circulation till 1969. IF you can find one, they're worth about three times face value.