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View Full Version : "Notice of Corrective Action" - Isn't that a fancy name for WRITE-UP??


RammsteinGirl
12-15-2007, 11:58 PM
Apparently, last Friday (12/7) I was short in my till about $10.00. It wasn't a huge surprise to me because I worked for 10 hours on checkouts that day and I was dead tired towards the end of my shift (my feet hurt so bad, I could barely walk!), although I don't remember anything specific that would've made me short.

I did not find out about this shortage until today (12/15). My HR manager handed me a sheet that was entitled, "Notice of Corrective Action," and made me sign it. I asked her if it was a write-up sheet (because it sure looked like it) and she said no, that I just needed to sign it, but I have my doubts. I'm usually perfect in my tills (why they selected me to work back in the cash office) and this is the first time in the 1 1/2 years I've worked there that I've been approached with a shortage and made to sign a piece of paper.

Maybe they're trying to get rid of me because I want time off after Christmas (funny how my HR manager is so pokey to get back with me about my time off, but she sure is quick to let me know when I've done something wrong!). Even though I suppose they are required to notify and make people sign these "Notice of Corrective Action" forms, it still kind of irked me, because I've counted thousands and thousands of dollars back in the office by myself and I've never lost any money.. yet they're so quick to crucify me over a measly $10.00? And that IS measly, trust me - I've seen MUCH WORSE shortages/overages from checkout operators (like $100+).

MiloMorai
12-16-2007, 12:02 AM
"Exactly what is it I'm signing? Corrective action? What exactly is that? What? You aren't sure? When you are sure and can tell me THEN I'll sign it. By the way what's going on with my time off I put in for?"

Always make them tell you in very small words that do not have 2 meanings.

RammsteinGirl
12-16-2007, 12:08 AM
"Exactly what is it I'm signing? Corrective action? What exactly is that? What? You aren't sure? When you are sure and can tell me THEN I'll sign it. By the way what's going on with my time off I put in for?"

Always make them tell you in very small words that do not have 2 meanings.

It does sound like a write-up form, doesn't it? I was upset when I was told about the shortage and I was also busy working back in the cash office when she approached me so I just quickly signed it. I'm going to poke around and see if this is in fact the official write-up form that Kmart uses.

I also don't like talking to my HR manager more than I have to because although she is polite and cheerful (TOO cheerful sometimes..ugh../puke) she just annoys the crap out of me. I'm taking time off after Christmas regardless, and I did submit a hand-written request back in October. So if they want to give me grief about it, then they can bring it. I don't think they'll fire me even if they do get pissed. They have such high turnover (it IS Kmart..) and it's hard for them to get and keep good, honest help.

Crazeyal
12-16-2007, 12:22 AM
There is usally a differance in the level of ire and culmulative effect when Management talks about "diciplinary actions". From my limited understanding (NCO courses in the Marines) It's simply a lower level talking to. You get trained, and there is a grace period for mistakes (usually 30 seconds:rant:) Then you get Officially reminded of your training, THEN a warning, THEN a punishment, which varies to more talking to firing to expulsion from the Planet (well.. MY bosses anyway..)

gunsage
12-16-2007, 01:49 AM
Actually, if it wasn't supposed to be a write-up, then you could've pursued one of the following paths...

1. "Oh, it isn't? Whew...that's a relief. Well, hey, if it's not a write-up, could you write that right here? Yes, just write 'NOT A WRITE-UP' across it and then give me a copy, would you? Thanks!"

2. "Oh, it's not a write-up? Well, I guess it's not that important then, is it? Nah, I'm not signing it."

3. Proceed to have him/her effectively define what it is. If you sense ambiguity, request for more clarification until head a splode. At some point, either the duder'll get frustrated and give up or get frustrated and demand you sign, at which point you find out if there's an "or else."

Another thing my wife has done on occassion is she'll take it from them, sign on it in nice BIG print "REFUSE TO SIGN" and then immediately make a copy before they can snatch it up and try to do whatever with it. You cannot actually be forced to sign something. Moreover, have they provided sufficient evidence that you messed up? A write-up is a write-up is a write-up. If you plan on sticking with the job or have been there for a while, definitely dispute it in the future.

Terry
12-16-2007, 02:53 AM
Yep, it's a write-up. If you don't agree with a write-up, then just don't sign it. I remember when I worked at Arby's and got a write-up. I didn't just not sign it, I tore it up and threw it in the trash.:D

Kara
12-16-2007, 03:31 AM
Ah yes, the Corrective Action. I have managed to avoid these at my company, but I've seen people get them. You are correct though. "Corrective Action" is a sugar-coated term for "Write Up."

RammsteinGirl
12-16-2007, 06:56 AM
Well why did she have to lie to me and tell me it wasn't a write-up? I specifically asked if it was and she nonchanlantly said no! :mad:

Terry
12-16-2007, 02:49 PM
Well why did she have to lie to me and tell me it wasn't a write-up? I specifically asked if it was and she nonchanlantly said no! :mad:

You might want to see if your company has a policy about creating hostility in the workplace, which she did by lying to you. I work at McDonald's, and they actually have a policy that says that if you are creating a hostile working environment for other employees, then disciplinary action can be taken against you. Not only that, it ALSO states that ANY type of retaliation by the person reported can lead to further disciplinary action. Even though I don't fear my boss no matter where I work, I certainly like having a policy like this.:D

Bright_Star
12-17-2007, 10:59 AM
Just like at Wal-Mart when you get a "coaching". That's just a fancy way of saying..."You're being written up". Whatever you call it, a write-up is STILL a write-up.

Cyphr
12-17-2007, 01:23 PM
she can say it isn't a write up because because kmart doesn't have write ups they "notification of disciplinary action" so technically she wasn't lying :ashamed:

Sir Spaniard the 12th
12-18-2007, 11:53 AM
Before you jump to conclusions, find out exactly what it is. And yeah, get a copy from them. Like others have said, get someone to tell you in a clear, obvious, no-ambiguity-possible way what it is, If possible, get a hard copy of that as well.

Also ask other employees that are still there whether they signed one for something similar.

It could just be their way of keeping track of mistakes or whatnot against your time with them, and could be viewed as a mere bump in your history there.

That said... To me it does sound like it could be a write up.