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Retail's Bitch
09-11-2006, 03:49 AM
Okay so I did 3 interviews in the last 2 days... I've done 6 in the last two weeks... These are some things I've noticed with Job hunters that really piss me off. I thought this was common sense... I thought that everyone job hunted like me... I thought wrong... This is what I've encountered in the last 2-3 weeks...

1. Dress Appropriately!! This means No Jeans, No Sweatshirts or T-shirts, ill-fitting blouses where it looks like the buttons are going to pop off and hurt me. No stained clothing. NO FLIP FLOPS! You are dressing to impress.

2. BRING A RESUME AND REFERENCES!!! In fact bring several. I cannot stress this enough! If I hear one more person say. "Well ain't nobody told me to bring one!" I am going to scream.

3. Check your references! Please ask your references what they're going to say about you before you add them! Nothing's more frustrating to me and moreso embarassing for you to have a reference spill your deepest darkest work secrets. Like coming to work drunk or not coming to work at all...

4. SHOW UP! If you can't make it, or you're going to be late, please phone us! Nothing irritates me more than waiting an hour for nothing.

5. Don't bring family to the job interview. This includes, but does not limit itself to: parents, grandparents, kids, wife, husband, and friends. I understand you may need a cheering squad. But Krikey I don't need to know they exist. Can they wait in the car?

6. Fill out all paperwork handed to you. You'd think this was common sense - but it's not... <sigh>

7. If I ask you. "Do you have any questions?" Don't say "No." At least show some interest in me and my company.

8. Come prepared! I always carried a hardback portfolio with me. With a pen, some blank paper to take notes during the interview, and extra resumes, a list of references, and reference letters. I always had my own pen. So should you. And so help me god if you ask for the yellowpages to look up a reference #.

9. Follow up! If you don't have reference #s or your SIN # and you tell me you're going to phone me by the end of the day with the numbers. I will expect you to phone me by the end of the day. Please do. Because if you don't I'm going to assume you don't want the job.

10. If we hire you... Please show up!

powerboy
09-11-2006, 07:55 AM
A couple of things.

1) The resumes. I always have mine with me, and every interview, I had, only a couple of them asked for one.

2) The reason, they might not ask any questions, might be because they are nervous.


Not trying to hate, on you or this post, just letting you know.:D

Seanette
09-11-2006, 08:23 AM
2) The reason, they might not ask any questions, might be because they are nervous.
Not trying to hate, on you or this post, just letting you know.:D
Or you might have already answered every question they had prepared. :D

Retail's Bitch
09-11-2006, 11:22 AM
A couple of things.

1) The resumes. I always have mine with me, and every interview, I had, only a couple of them asked for one.

2) The reason, they might not ask any questions, might be because they are nervous.


Not trying to hate, on you or this post, just letting you know.:D

It doesn't matter...
These are online applicants. The resumes are emailed to my DM. I never see the resumes. It'd sure as heck be nice to have one on me. I ALWAYS brought mine. It doesn't hurt anything, and as for #2. I ALWAYS had a list of about 10 questions to ask just in case. and I mean it could be anything... Like "Are you guys part of walmart..." Or anything dammit. It shows me you're trying at least. Mind you considering the 6 people I interviewed are also guilty of the other 8 things on the list. So there was no hope for them from the get-go.

I still can't get over the fact that she wore FLIP FLOPS to the interview. *shakes head...

Gurndigarn
09-11-2006, 12:33 PM
...the 6 people I interviewed are also guilty of the other 8 things on the list. So there was no hope for them from the get-go.

I still can't get over the fact that she wore FLIP FLOPS to the interview.

I had one guy show up looking like he had just mowed his lawn. Shorts, tank top, gungy sneakers. At least he didn't smell like it.

Had another guy show up twenty minutes late, then be surprised that I wouldn't interview him. Hey, there's only one person here. If you'll be late for an interview, you'll be late for work... and if I'm on duty, I want to go home after you show up.

JuniorMintz
09-12-2006, 02:07 AM
There is absolutely NO excuse for not bringing your resume to an interview. NONE. What the hell is wrong with people?!?

Misanthropical
09-12-2006, 02:28 AM
I get so nervous during interviews that I don't ask questions, because I'm afraid they will be stupid questions. :o

Gurndigarn
09-12-2006, 11:36 AM
If you're nervous, one question that works is either "Can you tell me more about the job/company?" or (if the job is a fairly basic one) "Is there anything specific I need to know about the position or your company?" It's a general purpose question that shows interest, and could lead to other questions.

And if they get shirty on you over something that basic, you know that you may want to try the place down the road instead.

Retail's Bitch
09-13-2006, 02:19 AM
And if they get shirty on you over something that basic, you know that you may want to try the place down the road instead.

You're right. It is basic, and if a person gets that flustered over a simple job interview question, they'd never last in my portrait studio. I have customers get 500% more hostile than anyone would ever dream I could. And if someone can't handle me asking simple, basic interview questions, my customers would eat them alive.

I don't think I'm being unreasonable in wanting applicants that dress well and come prepared. I made this list based on my own job hunting experiences - and interviewing people in the last week. When I'd go to a job interview - damn right that I'd research it and have questions prepared. Of course I'd bring spare resumes. I always prepared for any possibility. I don't think it's too much to ask for a person who's trying to sell themselves make sure that the 'product' is up to par.

If a person can't sell themselves, then they don't have a snowball's chance in hell of selling any portraits in my studio. If they half-ass it during the job hunt and the interview, which are the two most crucial points in first impressions, what are the chances they'd do the same at work and totally trash my sales average?!

CrazedClerk
09-13-2006, 02:34 AM
You should always have a few questions thought out that can be applied to most any interview.

I keep a folder of resumes and references in my room and I bring it to every interview.

Although I am guilty of not being on time, I always show up 5 to 10 minutes early, just to be safe. ;)

LostMyMind
09-13-2006, 01:29 PM
I still can't get over the fact that she wore FLIP FLOPS to the interview. *shakes head...
I'm guilty of this. But I have a standing rule, I only wear shoes to 2 places. Funerals and Weddings. Maybe court, but I doubt it. So be happy at least I got "flip-flop" on.

(Before anyone go crazy, it's for a medical reason. Not something easily explain via keyboard.)

repsac
09-14-2006, 06:51 AM
RB, I'd like to offer some other things to your rules. Some I learned the hard way.

1.) If you use a type of resume that displays your skills more than your work history, be prepared to explain WHY you did that format.

2.) Brightly colored paper only makes the HR dept throw it away faster.

3.) Please, do not turn in a resume that has not been speel cheked. Speeling iss empurtant.

4.) Do not bring your lunch with you.

5.) IF you must miss the interview, please contact the interviewer. However, don't ditch just because Star Wars was released that day. Think up a better reason.

6.) Do not flirt with the Interviewer. Especially if they are the same sex as you.

7.) a. If you get lost on the way to the interview, call and ask for directions.
b. If you must call before getting the interview, even if you know how to get there, still ask directions. They may be in another building.

8.) If you miss the interview time, don't rush in all huffy and make up an excuse. Apologize, and thank them for the time. Sometimes, they'll let you interview anyway. The honesty will help.

9.) If asked you have any questions. "I'm not sure what to ask." Is acceptable. It's also a great prompt to buy you time while you think up a question.

10.) Do not bring a cellphone. Or, if you do, turn it off prior to the interview.

11.) The same goes for pagers.

12.) and Lincs.

13.) If the interviewer asks how you're feeling. Don't go into a long rant about your piles or whatever. They really don't care, and are just being polite. Also, the only right answer is "OK" or any variation of that.

RogueOne
09-14-2006, 06:54 AM
4.) Do not bring your lunch with you.

And Definitely don't EAT said lunch during iterview.

RavenStarr
09-14-2006, 12:55 PM
The way you talk can also determine whether or not you get the job. I'm going to do this in a good idea/bad idea form.

Good idea: Walking up to the interviewer, introducing yourself, giving a firm but not too firm handshake. Stay standing until asked to be seated. When seated sit up straight.

Bad idea: Walking up to the interviewer and saying "Yo, wassup dog", then sitting down slouched in the chair.

Good idea: When asked why you want the job you say:I love photography. I want to work here to get the experience I need to open my own studio.

Bad idea: When asked why you want the job you say: Because I need the money.

Good idea: Sitting with your hands folded neatly in your lap. Listening to the interviewer, and answering their questions.

Bad idea: Sitting there twirling your hair, popping your gum, just looking completely bored and uninterested.

scruff
09-14-2006, 02:11 PM
9.) If asked you have any questions. "I'm not sure what to ask." Is acceptable. It's also a great prompt to buy you time while you think up a question.


I usually say "I think you've covered all the points I was going to raise, thank you." :)

dougiezerts
09-14-2006, 02:31 PM
I got fired from a job, once.:( It occured way back in 1981.
Do I need to bring that up, at the interview? If so, what's the best way to put a positive spin on it? Or does that fact that it took place 25 years ago work in my favor?
Thanks!

Broomjockey
09-14-2006, 03:31 PM
I got fired from a job, once.:( It occured way back in 1981.
Do I need to bring that up, at the interview? If so, what's the best way to put a positive spin on it? Or does that fact that it took place 25 years ago work in my favor?
Thanks!

I'd say don't hide it, but only bring it up if they ask. As long as your work history doesn't suggest job hopping, getting fired once doesn't look bad.
It's the people who change jobs at least once a year that firing looks bad for, because it looks like they are trying to stay one step ahead of being fired.

flybye023
09-14-2006, 06:05 PM
Most places are only interested in the last 10 years anyway. At least, that's what I've always been told.

dougiezerts
09-14-2006, 06:10 PM
Just remembered, it was 1983, not 81!
But anyway, thanks for the advice.

Gurndigarn
09-14-2006, 09:22 PM
I got fired from a job, once.:( It occured way back in 1981.

From twenty five years ago? If you can make it vanish from your resume without any gaping holes, do it that way. And only bring it up if asked about.

Gurndigarn
09-14-2006, 09:26 PM
Good idea: When asked why you want the job you say:I love photography. I want to work here to get the experience I need to open my own studio.

Bad idea: When asked why you want the job you say: Because I need the money.

Depends on the job. A lot of part-time, near minimum wage jobs, that's fine for. Saying "I want to get experience" during the Wal-Mart Christmas season might end up sounding a bit hokey.

I know that when I was doing interviews, I never counted "I want $$$" to be a bad thing. That's what I had to offer, after all. But if they started talking about experience, I'ld continue down that alley a bit... and if they were brownnosing me, it would count as a negative.

Tria
09-14-2006, 10:02 PM
I know that when I was doing interviews, I never counted "I want $$$" to be a bad thing. That's what I had to offer, after all.

How about, "I prefer eating to starving"? It shows I have my priorities straight and I won't be wasting my money on booze or illegal drugs and coming in drunk/stones. *Ducks*

repsac
09-15-2006, 12:59 AM
Also, while many managers look down upon it, if for any reason you ask them not to call a reference (work) putting "Must discuss in person" is acceptable by DOL standards. Also, "personal" is a good answer as well.

If you put this, be ready to explain, but try not to go into too much detail. One example from my past might be:

Company X. Years there: 3. Reason for Leaving: personal

When asked, I didn't go into grave detail, but simply said "I felt it was a hostile work environment, caused by the attitude of my superior."


ONLY if they asked more questions on the subject would I answer.


I've always looked at an interview like court where you're on trial for something and have to defend yourself. The interviewer is the prosecutor. While they may ask you questions, you should answer them as accurately and concisely as possible. Don't give them ammunition to use against you at a later date.

dougiezerts
09-18-2006, 01:26 AM
How about, "I prefer eating to starving"? It shows I have my priorities straight and I won't be wasting my money on booze or illegal drugs and coming in drunk/stones. *Ducks*
What if you said to the interviewer, "I collect dollar bills, as a hobby--especially chrisp new ones."
Then see how long it takes for your rear end to get thrown out!:D

COMINATCHA
09-18-2006, 02:26 AM
6.) Do not flirt with the Interviewer. Especially if they are the same sex as you.

Is this one of the rules you learnt the hard way? :p