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CherryB
09-16-2006, 03:14 AM
Wednesday my city held a job fair. Over 50 employers, some of them quite large,including my employer. I volunteered and worked the fair for a couple of hours- and I thought I had seen it all. How wrong I was.

Now I realize that not everyone there was actually a job seeker, I am sure some came for somehing to do and to pick up all the free chotzke's. (after all doesn't everyone need another koosh ball?) But I assumed you were looking for a job if you stopped by our booth and tried to drop off your resume. Having said that, I was amazed at the flip flops, shorts, tank and tube tops, multiple piercings and purple hair. Did they not stop to think that recruiters were manning those booths? While we have a fairly casual dress code where I work, it still doesn't look too good to show up looking like you spent the weekend in bed with a gorilla.

Let's not forget the rude ones either. Do not give me attitude when I tell you I don't know what hourly wage you will start at. Do not give me attitude when I tell you to go online to our website and fill out an application. This is a job fair, not an interview. And for Gord's sake do not get snippy and bitchy to our head recruiter. She does hold the keys to our kingdom and can make sure your application never sees the light of day if you piss her off.

Always fun I tell ya....to see job applicants...in all their glory. My hat is off to those who were dressed nicely, were polite and thanked us. I hope they all get jobs with us.

CrazedClerk
09-16-2006, 03:32 AM
Yeah I see this all the time when people drop off resumes where I work.

This phenomenon is not limited to retail level businesses, even job seekers looking for professional salaried employment can make these kinds of gaffes.

Mark Healey
09-16-2006, 05:17 AM
Having said that, I was amazed at the flip flops, shorts, tank and tube tops, multiple piercings and purple hair.

While I haven't looked for a job in about 10 years I've found it to be a good strategy to do so.

I worked a number of jobs in corporate type environments and hated them all. I got these jobs playing the dress-up and have a pretty resume game. I found that in all these places people were focused on superfluities, dress, how good a politician you are, how neat your area was (even when customers would never see it) instead of what your output was. They also practiced a lot of cargo cult management.

For the first time I looked for a job before I needed one. Since I didn't need a job I decided to do an experiment. I dressed the way I would show up if I had the job and my resume was printed on plain white paper. The theory being that a company that read the resume instead of fawned over fancy paper and talked to me instead of comparing my clothes to some fashion magazine would have a relatively low portion of idiots.

Not enough data to support a firm conclusion but it seems to have worked. I've been at the same place for 10 years now.

I've decided that if you don't need a job soon, test the company. I almost wish I were looking for a job now. I'd ask for contact info for the last 10 people to leave the company. I'd love to see the response.

Myra
09-16-2006, 06:21 PM
Once while I was still slaving for Claire's, a woman stomps in, her teenage daughter in tow. Daughter is dressed nicely, and the woman is not. She demands at me "are you hiring?" I respond in the positive. Woman demands to know for what position? I tell her part-time help. Woman nods and asks for an application. At this point, I'm like "What would an older lady want to work at Claire's for? And can she not dress up a little? It's not an interview, but damn!" Well I let her borrow a pen, and she fills out the application. She then throws down the pen and says "Here, sign this, honey." Apparently, daughter wanted the job, and mommy dearest filled out the application. Now, as far as I know, the daughter was mentally and physically fine. She was asking me how hard the job was when her mom was filling out the application, and if I liked piercing ears.

I left the app out, and told my manager about it, but considering my manager there was an idiot, I'm sure she tried to hire that girl. She seemed nice and all, but if you cannot fill out your own job application, and you have no developmental disabilities to keep you from it, then c'mon now. Is your mom gonna come to work and do your job for you too?

Tria
09-16-2006, 07:57 PM
She seemed nice and all, but if you cannot fill out your own job application, and you have no developmental disabilities to keep you from it, then c'mon now. Is your mom gonna come to work and do your job for you too?

Well, with the way the mom acted, she was probably too scared to try to take the application from her, let alone risk getting stabbed with the pen.... Ink's poisonous mm'kay?

Gurndigarn
09-16-2006, 07:58 PM
...Daughter is dressed nicely, and the woman is not... Well I let her borrow a pen, and she fills out the application. She then throws down the pen and says "Here, sign this, honey."... She was asking me how hard the job was when her mom was filling out the application, and if I liked piercing ears... She seemed nice and all, but if you cannot fill out your own job application, and you have no developmental disabilities to keep you from it, then c'mon now. Is your mom gonna come to work and do your job for you too?

It's quite possible that mom bullied her way into accompanying the daughter around AND bullied her way into doing all the gruntwork that her daughter should be doing. It sounds like the daughter, at least, had some sort of idea what a job hunt was like, even if mom didn't. And yeah, there are a few parents who would do something stupid like that.

Tejas
09-16-2006, 11:40 PM
I went with my partner to a borders job fair the other day for a new store they are openng.(job fairs not the right word - they told us about the store, than split us up to play games. it was actully fun and i won a $20 gift voucher) even though i wasn't applying i went in a suit and tie. she went in buisness attire. it suprised me the amount of people that went in jeans and a T-shirt or some such combo.

i found out later on there were over 500 applicants for 20 jobs and i'll bet no jeans wears will get called back

Gurndigarn
09-17-2006, 02:12 AM
I went with my partner to a borders job fair the other day for a new store they are openng.(job fairs not the right word - they told us about the store, than split us up to play games. it was actully fun and i won a $20 gift voucher) even though i wasn't applying i went in a suit and tie. she went in buisness attire. it suprised me the amount of people that went in jeans and a T-shirt or some such combo.

You wouldn't believe it. I passed the interview portion of my current job before I opened my mouth-- I showed up in a suit. I had no clue why, until I had spent time on the other side of the counter.

It was weird, though. I'm expecting questions about my background, what I can bring to the company, and so forth... and she's telling me all about the 401k program, the medical benefits, etc...

RecoveringKinkoid
09-17-2006, 03:17 AM
I really floors me the number of people who show up for an interview with absolutely no clue as to how to present oneself in a professional manner.

II temped briefly, after having been laid off at a lab I worked for that went under. I showed up for orientation at the temp agency in a dark suit. Hair up, professional style makeup, sensible shoes. Resumes, pens, and note-taking stuff in a briefcase. They fell all over me, and I know I started at a higher rate than many others. Why? I was one of the few people who showed up looking like I was fit to place in an office somewhere. I was a sellable product. I learned this in High School, it's not rocket science. What gives anymore with these people?:headscratch:

TNT
09-17-2006, 04:43 AM
People never fail to amaze me.

I once took a very low-level job with one of the most conservative companies on earth. Even in my low-level position, the dress code rambled on for page after endless page... men had to wear belts, matching socks, "proper undergarments," and have zero visible piercings. The most radical thing this company did was allow men to go tieless between Memorial Day and Labor Day, but they didn't really seem to encourage it. Before actually starting the job, we all had to sit through an orientation where the whole dress code was explained in exquisite detail.

So... the first day of training, a guy shows up wearing shorts and a tank top. I'll never forget the "WTF?" look on the trainer's face. He said, "I thought the dress code just applied to the actual job, not the training." She took him to the side and he left.

Later, the trainer said to me, "I make a lot of allowances on the first day, and usually the worst I do is send someone home to change clothes. But that guy was such a special kind of stupid, I told him to go home and don't come back, ever."

Rapscallion
09-17-2006, 08:18 AM
"proper undergarments,"

Who checked?

Rapscallion

TNT
09-17-2006, 09:56 AM
Who checked?

Rapscallion


Darn... you had to bring that up.

One day during training, I had lunch with the 18 year old girl who sat next to me. We were talking about the dress code and she said, "You know, I'm in violation." "Why?" asked I. "I never wear panties. I find them totally uncomfortable." (she had a fascinating explanation... and then... well, let's stop this part of the story now.)

Anyway, a few days later, we had an "incident" (itself a story worth telling) that required one of the Big Bosses to come to the training room and go over "Standards in the Workplace." He was a totally pompous ass, and he made a big point out of the dress code... when he got to the "proper undergarments" part...

My seatmate looked over at me... "Should I?" she whispered.

"You'll regret it if you don't," I said.

"Excuse me," she innocently said to the Big Boss. "But, um, are you the one who checks that kind of thing or is there like a person who's hired specifically for that?"

I never saw a grown man so flustered in my life.

Discourtesy Clerk
09-20-2006, 12:20 AM
...Anyway, a few days later, we had an "incident" (itself a story worth telling)...

And you're going to tell us all about this "incident" now...right? :D

Irving Patrick Freleigh
09-20-2006, 12:55 AM
:spew:

OMG! TNT's story is even more proof that Dilbert is non-fiction!

Broomjockey
09-20-2006, 02:41 AM
I've just got to say, I think it really depends on the place you're applying to. At my theatre, all the time people show up in jeans (not faded and ripped), t-shirts, and sneakers. These people get hired, and most of them are good workers. If I was applying to anywhere with an officey environment, I'd make sure I dressed up. Mickey D's gets my good jeans and a t-shirt with a collar. They're gonna be that anal, I'm probably not gonna wanna work there.

skeptic53
09-20-2006, 04:15 AM
"But, um, are you the one who checks that kind of thing or is there like a person who's hired specifically for that?" In 1970 or 71 at my high school a male assistant principal suspected a female student of going bra-less under her long-sleeve T-shirt. He hauled her down to the office, and with a female secretary present, had her jump up and down!!! He decided she was in fact sans brassiere, and suspended her. Her parents went to the media, the paper printed a photo of her wearing her striped long sleeve T and looking utterly mortified. The shirt was not tight, she was not bosomy, so what made him suspect the dastardly infraction, I don't know. If I were her, I'd hate both the AP and the parents... perfect justification to run off and join a commune...

protege
09-20-2006, 01:08 PM
I worked a number of jobs in corporate type environments and hated them all. I got these jobs playing the dress-up and have a pretty resume game.

You're not the only one. After having to dress-up every day for school (gotta love those damn Catholic school uniforms), I totally hate it. Why is it that "nice" clothes are the most uncomfy things ever?

For the first time I looked for a job before I needed one. Since I didn't need a job I decided to do an experiment. I dressed the way I would show up if I had the job and my resume was printed on plain white paper. The theory being that a company that read the resume instead of fawned over fancy paper and talked to me instead of comparing my clothes to some fashion magazine would have a relatively low portion of idiots.

I've always done that for interviews. To me, it's all about your first impression. For example, at one of my last jobs (the bank), I wore a suit and tie even though I was a lowly intern. My boss said that I didn't have to--he wore one simply because he was comfortable with it. I *could* have simply gone "business casual," but I chose not to. Since I was working at a small-town bank, and knew several of the board members, I thought I'd "play it up" a bit. It wasn't so much about brown-nosing, but simply trying to get ahead in the industry.

I figured, that most of the higher-ups wore suits to the office, and if I was going to impress them, I probably should do the same. Also, if I was going to be working at a bank full-time, I thought I should get used to the idea.

As for the "fancy paper" resumes, I don't waste my time with that. Sure, I'll use a slightly higher-quality paper, but I'm not going to spend a fortune on it :)

Becks
09-20-2006, 05:42 PM
Usually for interviews, I wear nice black pants, dressy shoes, and a nice top that goes with the weather/season.

Two exceptions--
One was for a Marshall's store (it was the week I was working at the dollar store, while waiting for the results of my drug test for Goodwill...wow, was I ever in demand). I was "working" next door at the dollar store, and went to my interview in my "uniform", but I was up front about starting a new job the next week or so.

The second one was for the store I'm working at now. I'd dropped off the application, and the man of the household took me in (he worked there at the time) to ask if they'd seen my application yet. I was wearing jeans, t-shirts, sneakers, etc., and didn't look my best. They KIND OF interviewed me, and then set me up for orientation. Ah, the good old days when you had a good chance of being hired if you knew someone who already worked there...

Sofar
09-20-2006, 05:56 PM
I love to dress up. I wear a tie, slacks, waistcoat, blazer, the works, pretty much everywhere I go. Usually the only special thing I do for an interview is get the blazer cleaned. The only problem is, I'm male and I have long hair. Usually I pull it back and braid it if I'm going to an interview, but I suspect that still has put more than one potential employer off.

Tria
09-20-2006, 07:08 PM
I love to dress up. I wear a tie, slacks, waistcoat, blazer, the works, pretty much everywhere I go. Usually the only special thing I do for an interview is get the blazer cleaned. The only problem is, I'm male and I have long hair. Usually I pull it back and braid it if I'm going to an interview, but I suspect that still has put more than one potential employer off.

Guy with long hair? I'd hire you.... Um.... But you wouldn't be cooking, cleaning or working with customers.... Sorry, long hair fetish.

TNT
09-21-2006, 12:24 AM
And you're going to tell us all about this "incident" now...right? :D

Well... okay. During training, we sat two to a desk. A guy about 18 was sitting at the table across from me, beside a woman.

For whatever reasons, the guy developed what they used to call, That Problem Peculiar to the Male of the Species. He was extremely embarrassed, and did everything he could to hide it.

The woman sitting beside noticed his discomfort, and thought it was the funniest thing she'd seen a long time. She told three people about it... me, my panties-free seatmate, and a woman who sat at the very back of the room, which was as far from the scene as she could possibly be.

Me and my seatmate thought it was hilarious, too. The third woman, though, immediately went to the boss. "I simply cannot be in the same room with that man ever again, knowing that he... he... he... has erections."

And the guy was immediately fired for sexual harassment.

Okay... we all have our sensitivities and I've no clue what may have happened to her at some other time in life. She had her reasons, and whatever those reasons may be, I'm sympathetic. Then again, it wasn't like he he paraded about the room saying, "Hey everybody, look! I seem to have developed a problem. Ha. Ha."

At any rate, HR decided we all needed an extended course in "Appropriate Standards In the Workplace." It was probably the most bizarre hours I've ever spent at work.

Just for educational purposes, I was tempted to bring up how it was I knew beyond any doubt that my seatmate wasn't wearing "appropriate undergarments," but it just didn't seem like the right time. They told us on the first day that "since your lunch hour is unpaid, you're on your own time, not ours."

Discourtesy Clerk
09-21-2006, 07:23 AM
Whoa. Poor guy. There's sexual harassment, and then there's overreacting... Yes, lady. He has erections. Men do that. Especially 18-year-olds who can't quite figure out how to keep it down yet. :lol:

What a prude. :rolleyes: He wasn't showing it to her, or talking about it. Sexual harassment requires intent, and I seriously doubt he intended to get wood in the middle of training. If anyone should be pinned with harassment, it's the girl who was announcing it to the whole room!

JuniorMintz
09-21-2006, 07:33 AM
Me and my seatmate thought it was hilarious, too. The third woman, though, immediately went to the boss. "I simply cannot be in the same room with that man ever again, knowing that he... he... he... has erections."

If anything, *she* should be fired for looking, or at least participating in office gossip about it. Poor kid. :(

I just hope the very next time the A/C is on high and her headlights turn on, someone goes to HR about HER. "I simply cannot be in the same room as that woman ever again, knowing that she...she...she... sometimes has pointy nipples!" :devil:

pbmods
09-21-2006, 12:33 PM
The general rule of thumb for job interviews is you want to dress like you would on your best day at that job. You don't want to be so casual that they don't take you seriously, but you don't want to get overdressed to the point where you look like you don't belong.

I remember I once blew an interview because the interviewer just couldn't get over the fact that I wore a tie to the interview (the position was a networking consultant, and it wouldn't have been a good fit for me anyway).

Job interviewing is sales; you have to sell yourself. Resumés can be fed into computers, but a human being is the one that decides whom to hire.

While it is a fine philosophy to dress how you want and therefore only get offered the jobs that you would like to have, I prefer to "jump through the hoops" with potential employers so that *I* can be the one to pick my job.

TheRoo
09-21-2006, 04:05 PM
Back in the day when I managed a gas station, a kid came in about 15 years old or so. His pants were about halfway down his thighs, and he asked me "How old do you have to be to work here?"

"Old enough to buy a belt."

He didn't think it was nearly as funny as I did.

Becks
09-21-2006, 04:15 PM
Roo, best comeback I've heard to that question!!!!!!! :lol: :salute:

Seanette
09-21-2006, 06:28 PM
Back in the day when I managed a gas station, a kid came in about 15 years old or so. His pants were about halfway down his thighs, and he asked me "How old do you have to be to work here?"

"Old enough to buy a belt."

He didn't think it was nearly as funny as I did.
:salute: :lol:

Great response!

CrazedClerk
09-22-2006, 02:46 AM
That was a good reply to that.

I have a striped power suit that I love to wear to interviews, I feel so confident wearing that thing, it's great :D You always got to dress to impress.

Discourtesy Clerk
09-22-2006, 07:11 AM
My interview outfit is this snap-up, wrinkle-proof black collared shirt and a pair of conservative tan corduroys, with black wedge heels. It's casual enough to still be my style, but it's professional enough to be taken seriously. It's now my lucky interview outfit, because I got my current job on the first try wearing that... :D

Oh, and I love the thing about the belt. Sounds like something I'd say. Usually when I can see most of a guy's boxers, I start singing the "Pull up your pants/They're hanging off your butt" song that my friends made up in middle school. :devil: They don't expect that.

dispatch
09-23-2006, 03:31 AM
I have never interviewed anywhere that I wasn't hired at, and damned if I haven't seen some things in the HR waiting room that made me think "this is my competition? if I don't get hired I'm hybernating for the rest of my life."
even when I had long hair I made sure to throw it out there that I'd cut it off if I had to (the gesture was usually enough to impress, until I went to work for the cruise line) and extended my hand before they did theirs, puts them off gaurd.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
09-23-2006, 04:53 AM
Well... okay. During training, we sat two to a desk. A guy about 18 was sitting at the table across from me, beside a woman.

For whatever reasons, the guy developed what they used to call, That Problem Peculiar to the Male of the Species. He was extremely embarrassed, and did everything he could to hide it.

The woman sitting beside noticed his discomfort, and thought it was the funniest thing she'd seen a long time. She told three people about it... me, my panties-free seatmate, and a woman who sat at the very back of the room, which was as far from the scene as she could possibly be.

Me and my seatmate thought it was hilarious, too. The third woman, though, immediately went to the boss. "I simply cannot be in the same room with that man ever again, knowing that he... he... he... has erections."

And the guy was immediately fired for sexual harassment.

Well damn! If having "that problem particular to the male of the species" is going to be enough to get a man fired, then maybe TNT's place of employment should just adopt a "no men need apply" hiring policy.

Of course that's discrimination. Imagine what would happen if a woman got fired for having, as JM mentioned, pointy nipples. That woman is a prude of the highest order.

I'd have told her to get over it.