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View Full Version : 'Like' or the Death of the English Language...


MiddleofNowhere
09-07-2008, 02:50 AM
Okay, I *know* I'm 'old-fashioned' and I speak very colloquially...

but when I'm approached no less than 3 times in less than an hour and asked...

'Do you have, like, Nike sweatshirts?'
'Do you know where, like, Adidas shoes are?'
'Do you, like, have a bathroom?'

Me: :cry: every single time

Yes, we have Nike sweatshirts. No, we do not have 'like Nike' sweatshirts.
Yes, I do know where Adidas shoes are. No, we don't carry a brand called 'like Adidas'.
Yes, we have a bathroom, but because you are a moron and can't speak properly, you will wee your pants because I won't tell you unless you can ask me properly, 'Excuse me, miss, could you please tell me where the bathroom is located?'

**I know that last one makes me a complete B*TCH, but it still makes me smile**

Fenrus
09-07-2008, 03:52 AM
I'll admit, I'll say it sometimes... If I'm rambling, I'll sometimes end a though process that got lost with "and it's.. uhh... like it's... oh screw it moving on"

But I think that's the only time I use like...

Anriana
09-07-2008, 03:53 AM
Okay, I *know* I'm 'old-fashioned' and I speak very colloquially...


Yes, we have a bathroom, but because you are a moron and can't speak properly, you will wee your pants because I won't tell you unless you can ask me properly, 'Excuse me, miss, could you please tell me where the bathroom is located?'

"Miss" is generally used for girls under 18 and I refuse to respond to anyone who addresses me as such and doesn't have grey hair. So, unless you're old-fashioned because you're old, you may want to wish people address you as Ms.

KnitShoni
09-07-2008, 06:18 AM
"Miss" is generally used for girls under 18 and I refuse to respond to anyone who addresses me as such and doesn't have grey hair. So, unless you're old-fashioned because you're old, you may want to wish people address you as Ms.

I thought "Miss" was for any unmarried woman? "Ms." is for divorced women, and "Mrs." for married/widowed women.

Kheldarson
09-07-2008, 06:22 AM
Actually, it's been determined that Ms. is good for any woman whose status you're uncertain of. Which would be anybody you meet really.

Anriana
09-07-2008, 07:58 AM
I thought "Miss" was for any unmarried woman? "Ms." is for divorced women, and "Mrs." for married/widowed women.


There is some sort of cultural rumor floating around that only bitter, angry divorcees use Ms. (I blame Die Hard) but Ms. is actually for everyone because it is sexist to base women's titles on whether or not they've married.


Of course, most people don't care about sexism or etiquette so it is easy to get confused.

Pezzle
09-07-2008, 08:15 AM
. is actually for everyone because it is sexist to base women's titles on whether or not they've married.


...What the hell? I can't wait to be called a MRS. instead of a MS. When did this happen, and why wasn't I informed when I was taught etiquette in every one of my primary school classes?

Soulstealer
09-07-2008, 08:30 AM
Well now that we've sorted out how to call strange women we can get back to the topic at hand. Yes everytime I hear someone abuse the word 'like' I want to smack them. Considering I'm a student and work on campus this happens often. I fear one day someone will use it one too many times in a sentence and I'll jump over the counter, screaming "That's not how you use that word!" and bludgeon them to death with the library books.

smileyeagle1021
09-07-2008, 09:10 AM
ugh, that drives me mad sometimes... I have a roommate who like, says like, all the time... if he were like a girl I'd say he was like some valley girl or something :rolleyes:
(and if you are lurking, you know which one you are)

Anriana
09-07-2008, 09:40 AM
...What the hell? I can't wait to be called a MRS. instead of a MS.

You looking forward to having your title change when you marry while your husband's remains the same doesn't make it not sexist.

When did this happen, and why wasn't I informed when I was taught etiquette in every one of my primary school classes?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ms.

Aethian
09-07-2008, 12:25 PM
I remember in my senior year we were watching a tap;ed news program and for a 'high school' story they went to the local community college and asked people the same questions and counted the number of 'uh/ums' and 'like'. Several were in the high teens for both and a professor knocked everyhone out of the park for her use of 'uh/um'. Only one person only used the word like ONCE and it was to say that the word like was dumbing down society.


On a side note, the class the professor teaches... Business English. Mom has her right now and she says it is driving her up the wall. So me being the evil daughter I am, told her to call the teacher on it. I wonder if she has yet.

RetailWorkhorse
09-07-2008, 04:28 PM
What's it like, I'll tell ya what it's like, it's like when you tell someone you like them and then someone else like as in like-like or like as in just like in a totally platonic sorta way?

:D

"Miss" is generally used for girls under 18 and I refuse to respond to anyone who addresses me as such and doesn't have grey hair. So, unless you're old-fashioned because you're old, you may want to wish people address you as Ms.

I demand humbly request someone point out the difference in pronounciation because I thought Miss and Ms was PRONOUNCED the same way, just different on paper.

Kheldarson
09-07-2008, 04:39 PM
"Miss" is miss and "Ms." is more of miz. It tends to blur the distinct sounds of "miss" and "missus".

RetailWorkhorse
09-07-2008, 05:09 PM
If you're southern with a thick accent then they both sound the same. Miss, Ms, and when I was in school Mrs, were all pronounced Miz.

The rest of it's gotta be some sorta Yankee thing, right? Help a poor southern boy out, I'm confused (which, granted, isn't hard, but I am getting sick of being called a girl because I look so much like my mother).

Kheldarson
09-07-2008, 06:22 PM
Don't know if it's a Yankee thing, per se, since I've heard it all over. (Army brat. Born Southern, raised midwestern/northern...now back in the south).

And I actually got my info on the generic "Ms." thing from Miss Manners. Go figure.

Becks
09-09-2008, 05:01 PM
Anyone who uses the word "like" for every other word in a sentence shall be sentenced to the :chipper:

Sparky
09-09-2008, 08:09 PM
...What the hell? I can't wait to be called a MRS. instead of a MS. When did this happen, and why wasn't I informed when I was taught etiquette in every one of my primary school classes?

There's nothing wrong with being called Mrs. socially.

There's also nothing wrong with being called Mrs. Thompson socially and Ms. Smith professinally.

Using "Ms." (pronounced miz) means "I don't know whether or not you're married, and I don't care because it's none of my business." If someone is considering me for a job, or selling me a pizza, or sending me a letter about a job or about a pizza, why in the world do they need to know whether I'm married? If they're selling me car insurance, they don't need this information unless I'm asking for a family rate. If I'm running for office, *I'm* the one running, not my husband. Let's leave him out of the discussion.

Now if they're inviting me to their dinner party, they already know whether or not I'm married, because if they didn't know me they wouldn't be inviting me. And they're probably inviting my husband too.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
09-09-2008, 10:14 PM
I guess this is a matter of "like" or death then. :rimshot:

Anyhow, I must shamefully admit I liberally sprinkle my speech with "like", "umm", or "uhh" as filler words when the words don't come to me easily. However, I can at least shelve the "like's" when I have to, like when speaking in front of a group or having a job interview.

I don't really know how it happened. I guess it must have come from listening to my peers talk.

Becks
09-10-2008, 03:33 AM
I guess this is a matter of "like" or death then.

Boo.

Good thing it's your birthday or I'd throw tomatoes at you.

ThePhoneGoddess
09-10-2008, 07:00 AM
The word like, just like the word um, is a discourse particle, as well as a qualifier.

You may not like it, but it's been used in those exact ways for 60 years, ever since the Beat culture started using it. Linguists consider it an important part of speech, and it fulfills several specific functions in the structure of modern English. In fact linguists have discovered that ancient Hittite and Sanskrit laguages contained words that served the exact same purposes.

Discourse particles have no direct semantic meaning in the context of a sentence. Instead, they indicate the speaker's attitude, or they help the speaker structure their relationship to other people in a conversation.

People have been griping about changes in the language for centuries, but the fact is that languages change constantly. When Samuel Johnson wrote the introduction to his dictionary in 1755, he stated that he was writing it specifically to "refine the language to grammatical purity", and then goes on to lambast all the people who speak 'wrong', and singles out porters, herdsmen, and females as being especially guilty.

Kheldarson
09-10-2008, 02:41 PM
Why do we always get pegged as a guilty party in the destruction of civilization? I mean, we were only used as a civilizing agent in Europe, colonial America, and the American West...*comic sigh*

Setsunaela
09-12-2008, 02:03 PM
I am occasionally guilty of such speech-statics as like, and um, and uh. I'm horrible at public speaking, and there's lots of "uh" in there, but I don't use "like" in every other word, and I don't even really use it in it's actual place. I prefer to say I prefer, rather than I like, mostly because of so many people in my school saying "like.. um... where's the like.. bathroom?"

DevilBoy
09-12-2008, 02:20 PM
What irks me even more is the horrible grammar and spelling used by most people these days.

I can understand a typo here and there, that's fine.
I especially cannot stand the following:

"your" used in place of "you're" (even worse is the vice-versa of this)

"their" used in place of "they're"

"here" used in place of "hear"

...essentially any time where a person misuses a homonym.
Spell-check is great, but it won't tell you that "you're" an idiot for using "there" when you should have used "their" if you spelled it correctly.
You still have to go back and actually proofread what you wrote.

tropicsgoddess
09-12-2008, 03:47 PM
I think after hearing the work like in every sentence I'd want to either :flame: the person for doing that or :banghead:. GAH!!!

Bella_Vixen
09-12-2008, 08:58 PM
Spell-check is great, but it won't tell you that "you're" an idiot for using "there" when you should have used "their" if you spelled it correctly.
You still have to go back and actually proofread what you wrote.

AOhell's spellcheck tells me if I used the wrong word, even if I DID spell it correctly.

Crow The Robot
09-12-2008, 10:11 PM
When i worked at Wal mart people would write checks payable to Wal-Mart's, drove me crazy, but the checks always went through.

Pezzle
09-13-2008, 03:19 AM
There's nothing wrong with being called Mrs. socially.

There's also nothing wrong with being called Mrs. Thompson socially and Ms. Smith professinally.



Ahh! I understand better now. Though I wouldn't mind being called "Mrs. Smith" professionally amongst my co-workers, but I guess that would count as social?

Broomjockey
09-13-2008, 03:14 PM
Okay, I'm going to need to ask people to confine this to a very narrow field, which is "customers using language incorrectly." Any discussion of proper grammar, changes in language, etc. are not brain burp material, nor particularly fodder for CS. Fratching does have a section entitled "Things I hate," which would be eminently suitable for that discussion.

marty
09-13-2008, 08:03 PM
My brother used to do the "like" thing, until I wouldn't stop pointing it out. Little sisters acting annoying can be a good thing. :D

I can't stand it when people use apostrophes wrong. Possession or contractions, people! I see that and the there/their/they're issue more than anything while editing peer essays.

otakuneko
09-13-2008, 10:34 PM
I don't remember getting much of the like, Valley Girl, like thing when I was working tech support.

On the flip side though, I'm sure a lot of the people I talk to would actually prefer if I used the "um/uh" thing a bit more often, to indicate a pause for thought. I tend to go quiet at times, which leads people to think I'm not paying attention.

powerboy
09-16-2008, 08:20 AM
I'll admit, I'll say it sometimes... If I'm rambling, I'll sometimes end a though process that got lost with "and it's.. uhh... like it's... oh screw it moving on"

But I think that's the only time I use like...


Same here.