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repsac
10-19-2006, 03:51 AM
These come from years of experience and living in the deep south. Translations and explanations included for yankees and those not of the united states.

Definitions:

Grits: Cornmeal and water mixed. Boiled to produce a thick liquid like substance. Eaten with salt and butter, or with cheese. NEVER with sugar. Sometimes mistaken for Cream of Wheat, though Grits are white with small black flecks in them.

Country Ham: Ham cured with salt to the point that it will never spoil. Even if left outside for years, it will not rot, nor attract insects. It may mold, but that mold is actually wanted since it adds flavor.

Red Eye Gravy: After cooking ham, the drippings are saved. Black Coffee is added to make very SALTY gravy that is drizzled over Country Ham.

Tea: Drunk iced and sweet in the south. Always sweet and iced. Unsweetened or hot tea by request only.
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Customer walks into a Huddle House (think waffle house) I'm eating breakfast in after just getting off my midnight to eight am shift. They have a decidedly northern accent.

Waitress: Hello, what can I get y'all?
Customer 1: We want something to eat.
Customer 2: I want ham.
Waitress: Ok, what do you want with your ham? Toast, Grits, Eggs, or Hashbrowns?
Customer 1: What's grits?
Waitress: (blinks) Uh. Corn...
Customer 2: Could you bring me a grit so I could try one?

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Customer orders a burger with no meat. (Vegan burger) They then make requests how it should be cooked, in what and so on. The cook shrugs and moves about his business.

As they eat, I can't help but laugh out loud as I see them eat (I'm at the bar and they're a short distance away. They had been rather rude to other customers, talking about how we shouldn't eat meat and such.

Vegan: What's so funny?
Me: If you don't know, you're better off not knowing.
Vegan: (snotty) Oh, and what's that smarty?
Me: Those fries, are cooked in Lard.
Vegan: Lard? What's that?
Me: Rendered pig fat.

The vegan blanched, stood up and ran into the bathroom, I'm assuming to :puke:.

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Customer orders ham with a tea, only to complain that the ham is too salty; the tea too sweet, and the waitress too stupid to take a right order. Waitress responds by picking up the sugar, pouring half of it on the ham, and then putting salt in the tea.

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My aunt (passed away) did this one. She came from Indiana.

We walk into a resturant, where the waiter takes our orders. I order a Low Country Boil, and Tea, and my aunt orders the same.

When the teas arrive, she sips it, gags and then starts off about how she didn't want sweet tea and would complain.

Aunt: (to waiter and manager) This idiot here took my order and now I can't eat it.
Manager: What was wrong ma'am?
Aunt: I wanted tea, and this buffon gave me sweetend tea.
Manager: Ah...I see.
Aunt: Well, I'm glad someone's smart enough to.
Manager: You aren't from round here are you?
Aunt: No, I'm not. Why?
Manager: Well, it shows. Ma'am, I hate to tell you this, but in the south, tea always comes sweet and iced. You want unsweet you gotta ask.
Aunt: Well, I'm never eating here again.
Manager: Promise?

Sofar
10-19-2006, 07:22 AM
Ah yes, how I love Southern cooking. In my backyard I once held a competition: Eight ounces of country ham versus eight ounces of salt pork, both unwrapped and in the sun. The ham lost the race to rot but won the taste test afterward.

Tea: Drunk iced and sweet in the south. Always sweet and iced. Unsweetened or hot tea by request only.

Except the tea, you have to realize that to the ears of an Englishman that sounds awful.

KaeZoo
10-19-2006, 12:08 PM
I've noticed that about the tea. In Michigan (where I live) when you order iced tea, they'll ask if you want lemon but not sugar; it just comes unsweetened. As you go south, the waiters begin to ask if you want it sweetened or unsweetened. Further south, and they stop asking and just start bringing it sweetened.

IT Grunt
10-19-2006, 02:11 PM
I've noticed that about the tea. In Michigan (where I live) when you order iced tea, they'll ask if you want lemon but not sugar; it just comes unsweetened. As you go south, the waiters begin to ask if you want it sweetened or unsweetened. Further south, and they stop asking and just start bringing it sweetened.

I'm definitely in the 'border zone', around here (West Virginia) nearly every place asks if you want one or the other. Me, I /love/ southern style tea, with enough sugar to give me a such a high that I'm ready to swim to Tahiti. :D

Becks
10-19-2006, 04:10 PM
Customer orders a burger with no meat. (Vegan burger) They then make requests how it should be cooked, in what and so on. The cook shrugs and moves about his business.

As they eat, I can't help but laugh out loud as I see them eat (I'm at the bar and they're a short distance away. They had been rather rude to other customers, talking about how we shouldn't eat meat and such.

Vegan: What's so funny?
Me: If you don't know, you're better off not knowing.
Vegan: (snotty) Oh, and what's that smarty?
Me: Those fries, are cooked in Lard.
Vegan: Lard? What's that?
Me: Rendered pig fat.

The vegan blanched, stood up and ran into the bathroom, I'm assuming to :puke:.



Evil, evil, evil.

I think a lawsuit could result from that.

{Disclaimer: I am NOT a lawyer, never have been or ever will be, and I don't play one on TV.}

Dips
10-19-2006, 05:27 PM
Thanks for the information. That will be helpful to know when I travel. :)

In appreciation I'm going to everyone in on some New England quirks.

Up here "regular" coffee means with cream and sugar.

If you go to a local ice cream stand and order a milkshake, you will get flavored milk. If you want ice cream in your "shake," order a frappe. The e is silent. If you say frap-ay, don't be surprised if people giggle at you.

The normal color for cheddar is a very pale yellow-white.

The normal color for egg shells is brown.

Picallili is the best thing on hot dogs. Also, hot dog rolls are seperated at the sides and sliced on top. This gives you two surfaces to butter and toast.

The best meat in the lobster is in the body just over the top of the legs.

Also, the red stuff is coral and the green stuff is tomally. Some people like it and some don't, but it's edible.

Baked beans are made with mustard, brown sugar, molasses and salt pork.

Real maple syrup. 'Nuff said. :)

IT Grunt
10-19-2006, 06:42 PM
If you go to a local ice cream stand and order a milkshake, you will get flavored milk. If you want ice cream in your "shake," order a frappe. The e is silent. If you say frap-ay, don't be surprised if people giggle at you.


My dad encountered this one years ago while attending training for his company in Boston. In his telling of the story, what he got was a guy getting a jug of milk, shaking it up, and giving him a glass of it when he ordered a milkshake. :doh:

Shaken, not stirred...

Upon calling him on it, and after describing what he wanted, he was told, "Oh, you mean a frappe!"

trunks2k
10-19-2006, 07:25 PM
If you go to a local ice cream stand and order a milkshake, you will get flavored milk. If you want ice cream in your "shake," order a frappe. The e is silent. If you say frap-ay, don't be surprised if people giggle at you.


Not all of New England. That's more of a Maine thing. I've never seen it in CT, RI, or southern MA.

Dreamstalker
10-19-2006, 07:47 PM
Customer 2: Could you bring me a grit so I could try one?

A grit?! :confused:

I'm a Yankee, pretty much (well, born in VA, then grew up in the northeast) and I adore grits. A (sadly no longer) breakfast place in Los Alamos had the best grits with cheese and green chile on their Sunday brunch buffet.

Never had red-eye gravy but it sounds yummy though.
Customer orders ham with a tea, only to complain that the ham is too salty; the tea too sweet, and the waitress too stupid to take a right order. Waitress responds by picking up the sugar, pouring half of it on the ham, and then putting salt in the tea.
:spew: :roll: That is absolutely hysterical.

Dips
10-19-2006, 08:17 PM
Not all of New England. That's more of a Maine thing. I've never seen it in CT, RI, or southern MA.

I've lived in eastern Massachusetts since I was 2 and local ice cream stands still use frappe to refer to the ice cream concoction (which others call a milkshake) and use milkshake for flavored milk. National chains don't, but the local places still do it.

The one thing I've noticed in Maine, maybe it's just in the area my husband's family comes from (Phillips/Kingsfield) is that frankfurters have bright red food dye on the casing. I've never seen that anywhere else.

Our locally made ice cream is fabulous. There are stands everywhere and the competition is fierce. I heard somewhere that New Englanders consume more ice cream per capita than anywhere else. Which is strange considering our climate. I can't vouch for that fact, but you don't have to drive more than five miles to find a place selling homemade ice cream.

Now I want a coffee frappe. :)

wagegoth
10-19-2006, 08:32 PM
My first husband was from the Northeast. He told me that frappe is mostly a Massachusetts and sometimes north thing.

He also taught me how to make a modern egg cream (minus the egg).

wagegoth
10-19-2006, 08:37 PM
That's the thing about the South, show some manners. (I know, I know, does not seem to apply to rednecks.) You can complain, but be polite about it. I love the part about the sugar on the ham and the salt in the tea. Awesome.

I used to work with a woman who complained at every restaurant we went to. I quit going to lunch with her. She expected a menu item at one restaurant to be a duplicate at an entirely different restaurant, or exactly the way her mom made it. RTFM(enu)!!! And ask the waitron if you want to be sure. Don't just spend your lunch (and mine) whining.

Dips
10-19-2006, 09:09 PM
Manners will do wonders anywhere. Especially when travelling.

Open-mindedness is good too. Don't think of getting sweet tea when you're expecting hot tea as a problem; look at it as a cool unexpected surprise. If you can only deal with the expected then why bother leaving home?

Sofar
10-19-2006, 11:21 PM
If you go to a local ice cream stand and order a milkshake, you will get flavored milk. If you want ice cream in your "shake," order a frappe. The e is silent. If you say frap-ay, don't be surprised if people giggle at you.

Back when I lived in Connecticut, there was only one ice-cream shoppe I knew that did that and they stopped eventually.

As for especially strange foods in the Northwest, geoducks anyone? And let's hear you pronounce that, we are famous for counterintuitive spellings.

thegiraffe
10-19-2006, 11:54 PM
Dips, there are an awful lot of ice cream places in Colorado also. We were out there in March....going through all the little towns and all, and it seems each little town had at least 7 or 8 ice cream places - it was incredible! I live in FL, and you'll be hard-pressed to find that many within a 10-mile radius (and it's suburban). These were places that were like....50 miles from other civilization. We were quite amused to say the least.

And the salt in the tea and sugar on the ham was BRILLIANT. Southerners (am one myself - from VA originally) have a lot of pride. Not such a hot idea to insult it...

Bliss
10-20-2006, 12:13 AM
Manners will do wonders anywhere. Especially when travelling.

Open-mindedness is good too. Don't think of getting sweet tea when you're expecting hot tea as a problem; look at it as a cool unexpected surprise. If you can only deal with the expected then why bother leaving home?

Beautyfull tought dips, as someone who was raised to try the "exotic" and enjoy stuff I agree wholeheartedly with you.

rdp78
10-20-2006, 02:06 AM
Well, as y'll know I live in Southwest Virginia and live here all my life. I always order my ice tea sweet and I do enjoy some good grits too. Anyway my state is known for it's pork products and besides country ham there is also Virginia honey ham.

Oh, speaking of what different states do with food, in North Carolina (my mom's from there) they put cole slaw on their BBQ meat on buns and if you seen Wendy's advertise their Carolina Classic (burger with BBQ meat with slaw on it)that's why it's called that. I also put slaw on my hot dog with chili and that's very common around here because you always find slaw at places that sell hot dogs.

repsac
10-20-2006, 02:13 AM
Got a few more for you. Some rather recent.

Ok, as I've said before, Huddle House is the kissing cousin to Waffle House. Bit cleaner, better food and what not. Awesome coffee. Nearly every city down south will have one or the other, sometimes both, and often several. If I were to describe the experience of eating at a Huddle House, I'd have this to say about it:

Walking through the door, you notice that the bar has several hard arsed stools before it. The floor is somewhat sticky, and there's a funky grease/food smell that while somewhat dirty smelling, has its own appeal. You also note, that the cook isn't using regular spatulas, but rather seems to be cooking with putty knives and spackling knives. (and, he is.) But, oh...what of the food? Food of the gods. Greasy, just so, but full of flavor.

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Recently, I had to run into Savannah to pick up some equipment that I'd placed in storage there. While there, something possessed me to wander into one of the HH's there. Maybe the grease content of my blood was low, maybe I had a craving for Hash browns. I don't really know. However, once in there I was witness to one of the most amusing conversations I think I have ever seen.

While waiting on my breakfast (even though it was well past noon, they serve it any time of the day) a group of about four or five people walked in.

Ever notice how you can pick a tourist out a mile away? I'm not sure what it really is, but there's something about them. Maybe it's that somewhat lost stare they often have. Maybe it's the accent, or perhaps the way they referr to things. Maybe it's the look of sheer disdain for everything your area has to offer and the people in it. I'm not sure what it is, but it seems that like I said, you can spot them a mile away.

This group, were tourists.

The first mistake they made was waiting by the door. Each time a waitress passed them, they were given a funny look, greeted and then left standing there. Some five minutes later I hear one comment. "I guess we just seat ourselves." Uh...excuse me? There ain't a hostess here, so ya, seat yourself is the usual rule. Don't stand up looking stupid.

Sitting down, they happened to choose a spot just behind me (I was at the bar). As the waitress passed, she dropped off the forks and took a drinks order. One actually asked her "What types of alcohol do you serve?" the waitress replied in that wonderful Georgia drawl. "Sweetie, we don't sell alcohol. Coffee, Tea, Soda, or water. That's about it. Though, I'd avoid the water if I were you it's soft and if you're not from round here it'll likely give you the jakes." The man (who I assume was the leader or patriarch nodded each of them ordering a cup of coffee.

The whole time they sat there persuing the menu, they talked rather loudly about everything they saw. From the clothing I had on, to the guy who just walked in, to this and that and well, you get the picture. Now, I'm not sure what they expected, but this place isn't exactly a jacket and tie affair.

When the waitress approached, they ordered. The food, came, and they ate; complaining all the while. Myself, being the perverted buffoon who loves watching idiots (and also wanting to avoid dealing with the drive home as it'd started to rain) got another cup of coffee and waited. It wasn't until the check came that the fun really started.

At first, the guy tried to pay with an American Express card. The waitress gave him a look. Smiling, she said appologetically, "We don't accept those sir." Ok....so next he draws out a check. Sorry, they don't take those either. The waitress asked for cash, and the guy said smugly that he had no cash, so she'd have to take his form of payment or (bet you saw this coming) the food was free.

I'll give the girl credit. She stood her ground and remained polite the whole time. "No" she told him. "You'll pay, or I'll call the cops and you can explain to them why you're refusing to pay your tab." The guy retalliated with a "And what's to stop me from just leaving?"

You know what I love the most about Kharma? It happens when you least expect it. The best kinds of kharma are totally unexpected, and wholly ironic. sometimes, I think whatever deity is up there has a seriously warped sense of humor. That, or has worked retail at some point. Right about the time the guy starts yelling his retalliation, two Chatam county police officers walk in the front for their hourly coffee break.

The waitress smiled some, pointed at the officers and said (again with that polite tone) "I don't think they'd like it."

You know, I don't think I've ever seen someone produce cash quite as fast as that guy did. And with that he left. It just goes to show, someone up there likes us.

Sofar
10-20-2006, 04:24 AM
Ah, tourists. What bothers me about tourists here is that they seem to think we're all putting on a show for them. We actually shop at Pike Place Market, we actually live and work in all those ancient buildings downtown, and whereas the monorail doesn't really go anywhere, our second-weirdest form of public transportaion, the electric buses, are something we actually use to get around. And the city doesn't just keep them around for novelty's sake, they're actually far superior to the deisel buses.

LdyJedi
10-20-2006, 03:13 PM
Tourists - shudder. Lancaster is crawling with them. I'm about to head into Lancaster City, to do my weekly shopping at Central Market. Every week, I wait and watch in wonder at what fun things the tourists will do. Some are very nice and some? They scare me!

RogueOne
10-20-2006, 04:12 PM
Got a few more for you. Some rather recent.

Ok, as I've said before, Huddle House is the kissing cousin to Waffle House. Bit cleaner, better food and what not.

There's one that's not so good. Ft. Gordon has one and me and my friends were not impressed. But that's just one out of a whole bunch.

Cia
10-20-2006, 04:33 PM
The only place I ever had any problems in getting regular (unsweetened) ice tea was a restaurant in Vancouver, BC. The waitress said that all their ice tea was presweetened. Okaaay. So I had a hot tea instead.

stickycoins
10-20-2006, 06:53 PM
Ok all you Southerners, don't beat me up here, but I was born and raised in Memphis and can't STAND sweet tea! Never have liked it, never will. My iced tea, coffee, and hot tea are always drunk sans sugar. Don't know why that is....Not much of a sweets fanatic either. Grits, greens, country ham and cornbread, now that's a different story!

Lackwit
10-20-2006, 06:59 PM
The only place I ever had any problems in getting regular (unsweetened) ice tea was a restaurant in Vancouver, BC. The waitress said that all their ice tea was presweetened. Okaaay. So I had a hot tea instead.

That was probably because their only iced tea was sweetened Nestea syrup in their soda fountain.

repsac
10-21-2006, 05:39 AM
Ah, tourists. What bothers me about tourists here is that they seem to think we're all putting on a show for them. We actually shop at Pike Place Market, we actually live and work in all those ancient buildings downtown, and whereas the monorail doesn't really go anywhere, our second-weirdest form of public transportaion, the electric buses, are something we actually use to get around. And the city doesn't just keep them around for novelty's sake, they're actually far superior to the deisel buses.


Trackless trolleys. Ironic when you consider that the design dates back to the fourties.

Sofar
10-21-2006, 06:01 AM
That's about when we got them, 1940. Same year General Motors went around the country tearing up trolley tracks and selling fleets of diesel buses.

Hempress
10-21-2006, 10:38 AM
Tourists - shudder. Lancaster is crawling with them. I'm about to head into Lancaster City, to do my weekly shopping at Central Market. Every week, I wait and watch in wonder at what fun things the tourists will do. Some are very nice and some? They scare me!

Yeah, Lincoln Hwy over by Rockvale is horrible, especially in the summer. Everyone wants to shop the outlets and take Amish farm tours. Farm tours make me slightly uncomfortable, like the Amish are being made out to be some sort of zoo exhibit...I dunno. I've never been to one, and I've lived in this area my whole life.

Knightmare
10-21-2006, 03:45 PM
I'm a Yankie, damn proud of it. Now I live in Florida. I'm a transplant. Go me!

In the 11 years I have lived in the south (1 year in Alabama, 10 here) I have never had good grits. Therefore, I hate them. They are disgusting. And believe me, I have tried them. I've had home made to high-falootin' hoidy-toidy restaurants, all clumpy yet swimming in butter. I've even had them at the Huddle House, and they just weren't good.

But try getting some good oatmeal down here. Impossible, unless you make it yourself- and if you can find real oatmeal, not the Quaker instant stuff.

My sometimes ex-girlfriend feels the same about oatmeal as I feel about grits. She was born down here (Which makes her a rarity in FLA - A Native).

LdyJedi
10-21-2006, 05:00 PM
Yeah, Lincoln Hwy over by Rockvale is horrible, especially in the summer. Everyone wants to shop the outlets and take Amish farm tours. Farm tours make me slightly uncomfortable, like the Amish are being made out to be some sort of zoo exhibit...I dunno. I've never been to one, and I've lived in this area my whole life.

:wave: Hi, neighbor!

We're currently looking for a new place for our dojang and one realtor wanted us to look in that area (we're currently at Park City). I told him thanks, but no thanks! I don't want to fight that traffic daily!

ThePhoneGoddess
10-22-2006, 10:31 AM
I lived in Santa Fe New Mexico for 7 years and I have seen the tourist reaction to local food more times than I can count. Especially with frito pies, Santa Fe's best street food. God what I would give for a frito pie right now (I'm in Oregon). Take a small bag of fritos, open it down one side with a sharp knife, ladle in some ground beef or pork that's been simmered slowly for hours in super hot red chile, cover with grated cheese, chopped onion and fresh sliced jalapenos. Has to be eaten with a spork while walking the streets of old Santa Fe. I used to see this on aa regular basis---

yuppie tourist with a superiority complex comes into the five-and dime (makes the best frito pies in town) and says 'I was told if I came to Santa Fe I had to eat a frito pie!' So they are given one---in the original frito chip bag. They look at the person incredulously, their lip curling. 'Umm...can I have it in a bowl?' Worker gives them a cheap paper bowl and a spork. They look flabbergasted. They eventually wander off, looking down at their food confused, wondering if they should eat it. I want to scream at them 'this is not fine cuisine here people! This is STREET FOOD! Eat it and be thankful, you worthless wanna-be culture junkies!'

*ahem* sorry. I feel much better now.

Since all of this southern food has been expounded on this thread (which I appreciate, I love southern food) I want to expound on southwestern food a little for any of you who have never been down there.

Chicharron burritos---thank god people don't tell the tourists to eat these. I think most of the health obsessed yuppies would have heart attacks! So mouth watering...so scrumptious...so comforting...and yet so bad for you. Wrapped into a large flour tortilla---pinto beans, melted cheese, onion, super hot New Mexico green chile and chicharrons (fresh fried pork rinds---I think they're called cracklin's in the south?---not the stuff you get in vending machines, but REAL fresh fried pork rinds---crunchy and juicy at the same time---oh goddddd....) and eaten piping hot for breakfast on cold wintry Santa Fe mornings.

Carne Adovada---cubes of pork simmered slowly in ground red chile until it's so tender they fall apart in your mouth.

sweet ribs---baby back ribs simmered slowly in a sweet, barely spicy red chile sauce until the meat falls off the bones. Literally. you pick up the bone and the meat stays on the plate.

breakfast burritos---more street food. A flour tortilla with a slice of canadian bacon, a serving of hash browns, eggs cooked anyway you like, and green chile sauce inside.

Chiles Rellenos Norte Nuevo Mexicanos---New Mexican green chiles, roasted over an open flame, stripped of the blackened skins, cut open, filled with cheese, then beer battered and fried, served smothered in green chile sauce with rice and beans on the side.

natillas---soft homemade vanilla custard. Little old New Mexican ladies like to put crushed nilla wafers in it---it's really good that way.

atole---thin blue corn gruel, served as a hot drink with milk and sugar.

posole---soup made of hominy, cubed pork and chunks of red chiles. Best eaten scalding hot.

Sopaipilla---puffed, fried yeast bread that's eaten split and filled with honey-butter.

Seanette
10-22-2006, 10:35 AM
PhoneGoddess, you're making me VERY hungry. :)

ThinMick
10-22-2006, 11:43 AM
Hey, yet another New Mexican! :wave:

I'm racking my brain for classic New Mexican food that just doesn't exist other places, but I think you got most of it. All I've got are funny stories and weird foods involving green chile.

Pizza with chile: It's actually a good idea. As suspicious as I was of it when I first came here from New York, a dozen years ago, the chile really does add something -- especially in combination with pineapple.

Sushi with chile: This one *still* turns my head. We have a sushi place that sells what they call New Mexico Rolls, which are avocado and chile (and possibly some other veggies, I don't recall) in rice and nori. I can't really speak to the wisdom of this one.

Green Chile at Taco Bell, Sonic, and Denny's: I got so used to it, I made an ass of myself in San Jose, a few years back. Apparently, Californians look at you *really* oddly when you ask for your burrito with green chile. I suspect it's the standard chile vs. chili problem.

Ooh, that's one we missed... Red Chile Chocolate Biscochitos. There's something to be said for chile and chocolate that can be dunked in your morning coffee.

Hempress
10-22-2006, 01:29 PM
:wave: Hi, neighbor!

We're currently looking for a new place for our dojang and one realtor wanted us to look in that area (we're currently at Park City). I told him thanks, but no thanks! I don't want to fight that traffic daily!

:wave:

I'd rather stay by Park City, too. There's a lot of traffic there as well, but it's not too bad.

Sofar
10-22-2006, 07:09 PM
Hey, yet another New Mexican! :wave:

Ah, I lived in Santa Fe for two years. They used to serve Frito Pie in our school's cafeteria.

powerboy
10-22-2006, 08:20 PM
AHhhhhhhh Frito Pie. My ex GF's Mother, made me once. And that was one of the best things, I ever had.

kerrisan
10-31-2006, 01:46 AM
That reminds me of Family Guy.

Peter Griffin: W-w-w-w-wait a second. You're telling me I flew all the way to Kentucky to get some of your fried chicken, and the Colonel isn't even working today?
KFC Employee: He ain't real. He dead.
Peter Griffin: What?
KFC Employee: I say he dead.
Peter Griffin: . . . IS MR. SANDERS IN?
KFC Employee: What wrong wid you? I say you he dead.
Peter Griffin: . . . THE COLONEL!

BusBus
10-31-2006, 02:27 PM
The only place I ever had any problems in getting regular (unsweetened) ice tea was a restaurant in Vancouver, BC. The waitress said that all their ice tea was presweetened. Okaaay. So I had a hot tea instead.

Unsweetened iced tea pretty much does not exist north of the 49. Iced tea is a pre-made sugar drink. *yum* We get the same shock when we order an iced tea down south and get a glass of cold, bitter, tea *yuck*

Cia
10-31-2006, 05:59 PM
Well after that incident I decided that southern Canada was like the southern US - very wierd. :p

Dreamstalker
10-31-2006, 09:29 PM
Transplant of a sort here...was living near Santa Fe for college until this past May.

Pizza with chile: It's actually a good idea. As suspicious as I was of it when I first came here from New York, a dozen years ago, the chile really does add something -- especially in combination with pineapple.
Oooh, I've never tried that one. Two of my favorite toppings.

A good friend back in Santa Fe makes oatmeal cookies with a hint of green chile. Just enough for a bit of a kick.

Any of the New Mexicans here familiar with Horseman's Haven? Their claim to fame is "level 2" green chile. I don't know how they make it, but the last batch I had my lips were burning for two days and chapped for a week.

ThePhoneGoddess
11-04-2006, 10:22 AM
Dreamstalker, May I ask what college you went to?

I'm an old Johnnie, myself.

Which means, that yes, of course I know Horsemen's Haven! It's not like it used to be. They used to have level 3 chile, too. We'd go there after a particularly hard day of school and do shots of level 3 in between sneaking into the bathroom to do shots of tequila. We used to go in there on Friday afternoon and the whole place would be filled with Johnnies, like every table in that teeny little place taken. It was great. Before they moved they had a teeny tiny little restaurant that only had 8 or 9 tables and a small lunch bar with 3 or 4 stools.

I can still smell the chile wafting from the tiny little kitchen...

Misanthropical
11-04-2006, 02:46 PM
Unsweetened iced tea pretty much does not exist north of the 49. Iced tea is a pre-made sugar drink. *yum* We get the same shock when we order an iced tea down south and get a glass of cold, bitter, tea *yuck*

I use to visit my grandfather in Alabama, when we would go to dinner I noticed that when I tried to order unsweetened ice tea, the waitress would look at me like I had just sprout another head.

My grandfather would tell the waitress we were visiting from the North, and tell me everyone drinks sweet tea in the South.

Another thing I noticed is that everything and I do mean everything is served with grits. YUCK!

Sofar
11-04-2006, 05:08 PM
Aw, but grits.

kerrisan
11-04-2006, 06:06 PM
In Texas, you can get sweetened or unsweetened iced tea. Which is good, because as I stated before, I HATE sweet tea. There is sugar at tables in sit-down restaurants so that you can sweeten your tea.

And alot of times down here, it's the African-Americans that eat most of the grits. I like 'em, but I prefer biscuits n' gravy and pan sausage. :D

Mike Taylor
11-04-2006, 07:07 PM
Oddly enough, the best grits I ever had were from a little restaurant in Evanston IL that specialized in gourmet southern cooking. These weren't just plain old grits with salt & butter. These had sausage, shrimp, curry, bits of celery, mushrooms. Oh man, it was so good. Even greater still, it was right across the street from one of my favorite game shops, the late lamented Something Wicked.

It was a regular habit of mine to go have lunch there after picking up a new game book.

Crawley
11-04-2006, 08:25 PM
There is sugar at tables in sit-down restaurants so that you can sweeten your tea.

The problem there is that unless the tea is hot, the sugar won't dissolve, it will just sink to the bottom.

Besides, why would anyone want unsweet tea? That's just wrong.


This message brought to you by a born and raised Southern boy.

kerrisan
11-04-2006, 08:28 PM
Besides, why would anyone want unsweet tea? That's just wrong.

I was born and raised in Bryan/College Station, Texas, and I can't stand sweet tea. That's just the way it is.

Greenday
11-04-2006, 09:18 PM
Well, I'm from New Jersey. We have a couple things you just won't find anywhere else.

A pork roll. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you AREN'T from New Jersey.

Pizza. Ok, New York can shell out good pizza too, but anywhere out of there, and the grade of pizza just isn't the same. I'm in PA now, and I've finally found a pizza place near me that just makes it decent enough. But back home, we had TONS of pizza places to choose from. I live on a college, and there are only TWO places nearby. Come on, it's a freaking goldmine!

As for the tea issue, tea is served hot in New Jersey. You get water, and a teabag. If you want it cold, you ask for iced tea. Depending on the place you go to, it may be pre-sweetened, it may be unsweetened.

And, one last thing, we have...THE WINDMILL! The best hot dogs and burgers, the BEST fries. There is no comparison to the Windmill.

LdyJedi
11-05-2006, 03:56 AM
And, one last thing, we have...THE WINDMILL! The best hot dogs and burgers, the BEST fries. There is no comparison to the Windmill.

Dickie Dee's for a good Italian hot dog, followed up by Rutt's Hut and then the other place in Newark that my parents adore whose name I can never remember ;)

(Jersey girl transplanted to Lancaster, PA here :-D )

tacohuman
11-05-2006, 04:23 AM
I was born and raised in Bryan/College Station, Texas,

i'm sorry...:devil:

(born and bred longhorn here :D )

on topic, though, i like my tea sweet and my grits full of salt and butter. you can actually find grits all over the country, not just in the south, and quite often in finer dining establishments. just look for polenta on the menu. same thing, either way, except polenta is generally made from yellow cornmeal and instead of white hominy.

Sofar
11-05-2006, 08:54 AM
Pizza. Ok, New York can shell out good pizza too, but anywhere out of there, and the grade of pizza just isn't the same.

Oh lordy, I'm so tired of people raving about their new "New York-style Pizza!" Sorry, not going to happen on the West Coast. Don't you go calling that stiff, cracker-thin FAILURE of a pizza "New York-style." Now, I like all kinds of pizza, I prefer your thinner crusts, (the proper thickness of a simple one-topping pizza is between three eighths and seven sixteenths of an inch,) and I like it to have that certain lack of structural integrity that causes it to be impossible to eat without folding it, (difficult to find in this city.) Only one topping at a time, please, I want to be able to taste the pizza underneath the toppings. Onions are good, as is pepperoni or meatballs. Impromptu poll: Goat cheese, do you approve?

Horsetuna
11-05-2006, 09:19 AM
I used to live behind an almost-24-hour pizza and donair store. they knew my voice by heart. I always got pick up (I walk across the lawn and I'm there) and they always knew EXACTLY how I wanted it.

It was always yummy. Their donair pizzas were best.

I do miss it.

Dragon_Dreamer
06-21-2007, 05:47 AM
Lesse... the ONE thing I've noticed no one can get right outside of my area. A good old Philadelphia Cheesesteak.

ONLY thinly sliced beef may be used, no chicken, no turkey, and certainly no hoity-toity meats like veal or venison. The bead, a good old hoagie roll. NO veggies except for onions and MAYBE green peppers. The cheese must be cooked with the meat.

And if the bag AND the paper wrapping on the cheesesteak itself isn't dripping and damned near transparent with grease, it just ain't made right. Either Pat's or Gino's is acceptable when purchasing, or made at home in a frying pan in a pinch.

Nothing less may be called a TRUE Philadelphia Cheesesteak.

Then there's the more rural Pennsy dish. Scrapple. Sometimes potatoes make an appearence, but usually, it's any meat that doesn't even get put into the sausage. I eat the rare cheesesteak. I avoid "real" scrapple unless I can confirm no bovine cerebellums went into it.

Killer Bees
06-21-2007, 06:10 AM
On holiday in Canada once, I ordered lemonade and the waitress brought me this sour yellow lemony drink with fluffy bits in it :eek:

I complained to my dining companion (Canadian man) and he asked me what did I expect? I said I expected Sprite and he said, "well, you should have asked for it then." :lol:

I'd never drunk real lemonade before, but I actually enjoyed it. I was very careful from then on to ask for Sprite.

Sliceanddice
06-21-2007, 06:12 AM
The only place I ever had any problems in getting regular (unsweetened) ice tea was a restaurant in Vancouver, BC. The waitress said that all their ice tea was presweetened. Okaaay. So I had a hot tea instead.

their ice tea must have sucked.

My favorite thing is trying ice cream by area. Because in arizona you can get the classic places the water stores or the interesting ice cream joints and they all have different kinds of ice cream and i love the different feel they all have.

tollbaby
06-21-2007, 01:52 PM
On holiday in Canada once, I ordered lemonade and the waitress brought me this sour yellow lemony drink with fluffy bits in it :eek:

I complained to my dining companion (Canadian man) and he asked me what did I expect? I said I expected Sprite and he said, "well, you should have asked for it then." :lol:


you call Sprite lemonade????? That's the first time I've heard that one.... Lemonade is lemon juice, water and sugar. That's it ;) (although I've been told that in the UK, it's usually carbonated).

Catwoman2965
06-21-2007, 04:57 PM
Well, I'm from New Jersey. We have a couple things you just won't find anywhere else.

A pork roll. If you don't know what I'm talking about, you AREN'T from New Jersey.

Pizza. Ok, New York can shell out good pizza too, but anywhere out of there, and the grade of pizza just isn't the same. I'm in PA now, and I've finally found a pizza place near me that just makes it decent enough. But back home, we had TONS of pizza places to choose from. I live on a college, and there are only TWO places nearby. Come on, it's a freaking goldmine!

As for the tea issue, tea is served hot in New Jersey. You get water, and a teabag. If you want it cold, you ask for iced tea. Depending on the place you go to, it may be pre-sweetened, it may be unsweetened.

And, one last thing, we have...THE WINDMILL! The best hot dogs and burgers, the BEST fries. There is no comparison to the Windmill.

I'm from Jersey, and was JUST going to put in my two cents, but you beat me to it! I personally don't like pork roll, but i know what it is.

Pizza too; went to college in MD, and the best pizza there was Dominos...that was the first thing i had when i came home!

I always ask, even in Jersey, if the tea is sweetened or not; becuase every once in a while, i'll get some that is already sweetened, and i like it without sugar.

Never tried the Windmill, but again, i know of it..there aren't any near me.

And how could you forget White Castle? hahahaha - again, not a fave, but definitely a Jersey (and other states) thing.

And as far as expanding your horizons, about 5 years ago, i drove from NJ to AZ, and back again. With 2 friends who are the PICKIEST eaters i have ever known. I was looking forward to having some authentic, regional food, but no..fast food all the way..YUCK! We spent a week in AZ, and not once had any type of MExican/southwestern food...they don't like it...

And i was just in Puerto Rico after a cruise; my friend went home a day early as she was sick, so i was able to have some real Latin food...of course the name esacpes me, but it was mashed, fried green plantains, with chicken..Mofongo, that's it...and it was so good! Had my friend been with me though, nope, we would have gone somewhere that had locations in the US, as she is also very fussy.

Catwoman2965
06-21-2007, 05:04 PM
Lesse... the ONE thing I've noticed no one can get right outside of my area. A good old Philadelphia Cheesesteak.

ONLY thinly sliced beef may be used, no chicken, no turkey, and certainly no hoity-toity meats like veal or venison. The bead, a good old hoagie roll. NO veggies except for onions and MAYBE green peppers. The cheese must be cooked with the meat.

And if the bag AND the paper wrapping on the cheesesteak itself isn't dripping and damned near transparent with grease, it just ain't made right. Either Pat's or Gino's is acceptable when purchasing, or made at home in a frying pan in a pinch.

Nothing less may be called a TRUE Philadelphia Cheesesteak.

Then there's the more rural Pennsy dish. Scrapple. Sometimes potatoes make an appearence, but usually, it's any meat that doesn't even get put into the sausage. I eat the rare cheesesteak. I avoid "real" scrapple unless I can confirm no bovine cerebellums went into it.

EEWWWWWW - mom's side of the family is from western pa, and my dad eats scrapple....no thank you..and then there is my favorite (NOT!) she used to make when i was a kid...creamed chipped beef on toast (otherwise known as sh... on a shingle, or v....t on toast, as i like to call it)

FuzzyKitten99
06-21-2007, 05:21 PM
Lemonade here in Minnesota is just that- lemons & water & sugar. If you want Sprite, you have to say it. Same with any other softdrink. We all pretty much use the name the product was given by its' producer, so no need to translate anything. It's the midwestern KISS mentality here.

People here like to customize their food a lot, so regular coffee means not decaf and it is served w/o sugar or cream, but the little packets of each are available for your use. If you ask for just 'tea', you will be asked 'iced or hot', and 99% of restaurants serve unsweetened iced tea, because it sells better when people can sweeten it to their taste and diabetics can use the sugar substitutes. Lemon is available at most places, but you usually have to ask for it.

tollbaby
06-21-2007, 06:03 PM
White Castle isn't just a Jersey thing. I was DRAGGED to a WC by a Chicago friend... gross. It's not even recognizable as food *shudder*

Jinxy
06-21-2007, 06:12 PM
First a bit of backstory, I am a Lobsterman's daughter, I spent the first 10 years of my life living outside of Chicago, then moved to CT (where dad is from) so we (as in the whole family) could lobster. It was a tourist area, so tourists were always around but got way worse after the casinos opened. In January I moved to metro Atlanta area.

I had not had real pizza in 14 years after leaving Illinois, until I went back for a family wedding and got Chicago style again. In fact my bf found this out and on our first date found a local place that does the best Chicago style I've ever had outside of Illinois. It's part of the reason I packed up and moved to be down here with him. :D
I contantly hear when we eat at this place (Nancy's if you want to go try it) "where's the cheese?" as Chicago style has the cheese on the crust before the toppings, "How do I eat it?", well a knife and fork seem to work, as it's hard to pick up a full slice.

There there's the lobster stuff. I can crack a lobster bare handed (well not claws all the way, back and tail 100%), there's a trick to it, but when you deal with it on a daily basis for years and eat it all winter,...every winter, for years and years and years you learn it.
Lobster to a lobsterman isn't a treat either ;) However you have no idea how many people tell me how lucky I was growing up getting to eat it all the time.

Now I'm faced with grits, which I haven't tried yet as no one who's from the area can tell me a good place to get them, Sweet tea, which is not bad if I want to end up in a sugar-induced coma, (I normally get unsweetened and add my own sugar and I'm always offered the option of sweet or unsweet locally), BBQ which is thought to be a high art apparently, I like ribs and I like a sweet sauce with some kick to it so far.

I miss fry-shacks, frappes, really good ice cream, Nissin bread, greek and portaguese pizza places and this post has not only gotten away from me but made me homesick.

Jinxy

Gawdzillers
06-21-2007, 10:08 PM
Lesse... the ONE thing I've noticed no one can get right outside of my area. A good old Philadelphia Cheesesteak.

ONLY thinly sliced beef may be used, no chicken, no turkey, and certainly no hoity-toity meats like veal or venison. The bead, a good old hoagie roll. NO veggies except for onions and MAYBE green peppers. The cheese must be cooked with the meat.
I thought a true Cheesesteak used Cheez Whiz sauce rather than real cheese.

LostMyMind
06-22-2007, 02:37 PM
Now I'm faced with grits, which I haven't tried yet as no one who's from the area can tell me a good place to get them,
No grits is better than bad grits. Nothing is as nasty as bad grits (well almost nothing). So easy to turn grits bad, and it's not the place it's the cook. Really there no way to tell, you just have to order and try it. You'll know if it's good or bad.

zzapp the witch
06-22-2007, 04:27 PM
My grandma's family is from Alabama, so I grew up on a lot of the good stuff. Here in Oregon, if I want sweetened tea, I let em know I want it "Georgia sweet," otherwise they have to bring me a pile of sugar packets and all of the other patrons look at me like I'm nuts. You can't get decent grits here, you have to make your own, and I prefer gold hominy.

I did my army basic training in South Carolina, the Drill Sargeant was impressed that I was the only northerner that put salt and pepper, and my eggs and bacon in my grits. Apparently, I'm pretty smart for a yankee.

Once, in the chow line, there was a choice of veggies and I was trying to figure out wtf this pile of goopy dark green was. DS came up behind me and hollered, "What's the hold up here, soldier?" "DS, what are collard greens?" "Where the HELL you from, private?" "Oregon, DS." In a calm voice, "Oh, those are the weeds that grow on the railroad tracks." I later found out that that DS was from a town here whos school was in my school's league. :lol:

Pickled pigs feet aren't that bad.

When I was meeting my late hubby's family in upstate NY (Jeffersonville for anyone that knows the area) I was pregnant and had a horrible craving for a beer dog (AKA Hot Mama's or Big Daddy's around here), went all over the place trying to find something like what I was describing to my hubby---red dyed casing, fat, spicy sausage. No go, until he just went into a bar to ask, the bartender laughed and said, "Oh, you want a Pickled Deer Dick." and handed me one from a jar under the bar.

We bought five more. :D

Dreamstalker
06-22-2007, 04:46 PM
Sushi with chile: This one *still* turns my head. We have a sushi place that sells what they call New Mexico Rolls, which are avocado and chile (and possibly some other veggies, I don't recall) in rice and nori. I can't really speak to the wisdom of this one.
I think I know the restaurant of which you speak...that roll actually isn't bad at all. If it's the place I'm thinking of (Izmi on St. Michael's Dr in Santa Fe), they also have green chile tempura which is interesting.

I used to have seemingly endless debates with The Twit about the whole chili/chile spelling thing.

AFpheonix
06-22-2007, 05:42 PM
their ice tea must have sucked.

My favorite thing is trying ice cream by area. Because in arizona you can get the classic places the water stores or the interesting ice cream joints and they all have different kinds of ice cream and i love the different feel they all have.

We have good ice cream around here, but my god, the best ice cream I've ever had was in Madrid. Drooooooollll.......

VicSilver
06-23-2007, 01:41 AM
KFC Employee: What wrong wid you? I say you he dead.


Oh, god, that just cracks me up everytime I see/hear that. I didn't see the episode, but my sister (who is awesome at impersonations) told me about it. Just hearing her say it cracked me up that I had her do it over and over, to the point that my mother and husband threatened to hurt us if we didn't stop.

God, I just started snickering all over when I saw that...of course, hubby wanted to know why, so when I shouted, "I say you he dead!" he just groaned....
:roll:

VicSilver
06-23-2007, 01:45 AM
Besides, why would anyone want unsweet tea? That's just wrong.


This message brought to you by a born and raised Southern boy.

My husband is a southern boy, but will drink either. He won't "change" unsweetened tea into sweetened though...if it was made without sugar, he drinks it without sugar... He's real funny about adding anything after it's brewed. Says it just 'don't taste right'.

JustADude
06-23-2007, 04:39 AM
I thought a true Cheesesteak used Cheez Whiz sauce rather than real cheese.

There are two places in Philly right next to each other that, IIRC, started selling them at nearly the same time and are still both going strong. One uses cheese sauce, the other uses slices, and both are abso-f*cking-lutely delicious.

Skandranon
06-23-2007, 06:26 PM
My mom made some of the best grits. Every summer, 6 am to 7 pm, we'd spend at the local swim club exhausting ourselves. Usually skipping lunch along the way. So when we got home, while we took our bath, mom made her grits. A bowl as big around as a plate for each of us, filled to the brim with grits. She mixed in cheddar, eggs, and honey. It was sweet sweet ambrosia. And tell you what, grits will fill you up like nothing else.

I've only had one I'm-a-tourist mistake travelling, that I remember. Was in the NW US, touring the parks, and we stopped into a breakfast place to eat. I asked for buttermilk pancakes. I guess they didn't know the term, or I had too much accent, b/c I ended up with blueberry.

Pagan
06-24-2007, 02:06 AM
We actually shop at Pike Place Market, we actually live and work in all those ancient buildings downtown,

Please tell me you're being a little sarcastic about the "ancient" buildings! Just because I'm sitting about 60 miles south of the City Different. The oldest continuous capital in the US (not to mention the oldest church and house)

I lived in Santa Fe New Mexico for 7 years and I have seen the tourist reaction to local food more times than I can count.

yuppie tourist with a superiority complex comes into the five-and dime (makes the best frito pies in town) and says 'I was told if I came to Santa Fe I had to eat a frito pie!' So they are given one---in the original frito chip bag. They look at the person incredulously, their lip curling. 'Umm...can I have it in a bowl?'

breakfast burritos---more street food. A flour tortilla with a slice of canadian bacon, a serving of hash browns, eggs cooked anyway you like, and green chile sauce inside.

Chiles Rellenos Norte Nuevo Mexicanos---New Mexican green chiles, roasted over an open flame, stripped of the blackened skins, cut open, filled with cheese, then beer battered and fried, served smothered in green chile sauce with rice and beans on the side.

Tomasita's has a sign saying, in effect, that sometimes the chile is hot, and no, we're not going to cater to the damn tourist tender mouths!

The five-and-dime is still there and still doing a land-office business on the the frito pies.

The best way to have breakfast burritos is with a cup of hot chocolate whilst freezing your ass off waiting for the balloons to start inflating at the Balloon Fiesta.

That's the way we make Chiles Rellenos in southern NM, too.

Hey, yet another New Mexican! :wave:

I'm racking my brain for classic New Mexican food that just doesn't exist other places, but I think you got most of it. All I've got are funny stories and weird foods involving green chile.

Pizza with chile: It's actually a good idea. As suspicious as I was of it when I first came here from New York, a dozen years ago, the chile really does add something -- especially in combination with pineapple.

Apparently, Californians look at you *really* oddly when you ask for your burrito with green chile. I suspect it's the standard chile vs. chili problem.

See, now, being a native New Mexican, I'm surprised when pizza doesn't have chile!

When I lived in Lake Tahoe one summer, I went into Reno and had lunch at Chili's (of all places). I ordered what I normally would in Las Cruces, which came with green chile. However, when it came, it had chili (beans and meat concoction) all over it. I made a face thought I had ordered wrong. When I asked the waitress, she looked at me funny and asked why I would want that on a burger! :lol:

Actually, that's how I kept my roommates out of my food. I'd put green chile in everything! :lol:

I used to have seemingly endless debates with The Twit about the whole chili/chile spelling thing.

Oh, my f*cking Goddess, don't get me started! "Chili" is a Tex-Mex meat concotion. "Chile" is the fruit of the capsicum! (Try this: http://spectre.nmsu.edu/dept/welcome.html?t=CHILE) I'm a little touchy about it too, being an alumnus of NMSU!

And then there's the difference between southern and northern New Mexico! The biggest one is enchiladas. It seems to be peculiar to the southern part of the state, but we make them flat down there. Up here, they're rolled. The World's Biggest Enchilada, (http://www.zianet.com/sunny/html/36.html) just wouldn't have the same impact if it's rolled. (BTW, Roberto's makes the best flour tortillas) And then there's the biscochos. Up here, they are called biscochitos, which is diminuative. I'm sorry, but a cookie that's 3" across are not little! Damn, now I want enchiladas and biscochos. :p

CancelMyService
06-24-2007, 02:31 AM
In Pittsburgh, it begins and ends with Primanti Brothers (http://www.rackdeal.com/primantibrothers/).

Sofar
06-24-2007, 03:18 AM
Please tell me you're being a little sarcastic about the "ancient" buildings! Just because I'm sitting about 60 miles south of the City Different. The oldest continuous capital in the US (not to mention the oldest church and house)

Don't you rag on our effing architecture! A century and a half is pretty goddamn old for the west coast, especially when most cities just pull the things down and have done with it. You know nothing in this country measures up to Europe anyway.

justZu
06-24-2007, 03:40 AM
As for especially strange foods in the Northwest, geoducks anyone? And let's hear you pronounce that, we are famous for counterintuitive spellings.

Aren't they pronounced "gooey ducks"? Those things are *scary* looking.

CRXPanda
06-24-2007, 02:48 PM
as one of african descent...in the south...our tea was not only iced SWEET, it's sooooo sweet, it can cause diabetic shock (as well as "drink"...orange drink, grape drink, coolade-not kool aid...u get my meaning) if the instructions are one cup of sugar for every half gallon, it's translated to one cup of sugar for every quart...and if you freeze it to make honeydrippers, double both the sugar and drink mix and half the water...

just thought i'd reflect.

anyone else have a way their grammas made their drink as a kid?

traylk
06-24-2007, 08:03 PM
I'm originally from Michigan but moved to Texas about 10 months ago.

I get made fun of by my co-workers all the time because of the "Yankee" way I talk. I get funny looks everytime I ask them to clean the pop machine. (I refuse to say soda.....in MI we drink pop and bake with soda) Now I just say the drink machine.

I also miss Faygo...Vernors...White Castle(best after the bar)...Cheryl's Place(best breakfast in town 12 yrs running)...and all the yummy cherry items at the Traverse City Cherry fest(salsa, jam, jelly, pies, BBQ sauce, marinades, wine). My favorite pizza has always been Hungry Howies which I thought was a northerner thing but I just found out there are 2 within 15 miles of my house! WooHoo!!!:D

The shocker for me was when I lived in Hawaii and everywhere sold spam. I actually like it fried with white rice on the side. I remember the weirdest one I saw was spagetti w/ mini spam balls. I never tried it though.

blas
06-24-2007, 08:24 PM
Around this particular area, people have fallen in love with Southern food. There used to be 2 or 3 Southern restaurants around here, now there's only 1...I think.

Some guy took me on a date to the Southern restaurant. I hate to sound ignorant and dumb, but all the food in the menu, the descriptions sounded just disgusting and rancid.

It was probaby a bad idea to go there because I cannot stand spicey food, and nearly everything on the menu was described as being hot.

I ordered a mushroom swiss burger and fries. Of course, the fries were on fire with whatever spices they put in them, and the burger was even more on fire.

I picked at my fries, said I wasn't hungry, got a to-go box, and promptly gave it to my friend on my way home because she loves spicey food.

I'm picking the restaurants from now on.

ArenaBoy
06-24-2007, 08:28 PM
I also miss Faygo...Vernors...White Castle(best after the bar)...Cheryl's Place(best breakfast in town 12 yrs running)...and all the yummy cherry items at the Traverse City Cherry fest(salsa, jam, jelly, pies, BBQ sauce, marinades, wine). My favorite pizza has always been Hungry Howies which I thought was a northerner thing but I just found out there are 2 within 15 miles of my house! WooHoo!!!:D


VERNORS!! The best ginger ale out there. I love giving that stuff to out of state folks, the reactions are always priceless. Faygo and White Castle are great and yes Hungry Howies has always been great but I'm more of a Buddy's fan. Speaking of which, I need to replenish my Vernors supply. Here's a little Wikipedia article on Vernors, I love the stuff. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernors

MystyGlyttyr
06-24-2007, 09:54 PM
Let's see...I'm from rural Arkansas, what food do we have...?

Well, snake tastes like a really bland chicken and alligator is just...wrong...fishy AND chickeny, yuck. Squirrel is all right, a bit on the stringy side. Crow is FOUL. Sorrel has a nice sour kick to it. Wild strawberries are too small most of the time. There are these tiny little purple flowers that taste just like lettuce, but they're a pain in the ass to gather up. Grasshopper is good so long as you burn it to a crisp. Tastes kind of like potato chips. And plums are best when they're still yellow.

Yeah, down here, we'll pretty much eat anything that holds still long enough.

myswtghst
06-24-2007, 10:27 PM
Aren't they pronounced "gooey ducks"? Those things are *scary* looking.

And the best part is, I only recently learned about geoducks thanks to Top Chef on Bravo. :o

I'm from Chicago, so I have to stand up and say that I think we have the absolute best hot dogs, Italian beef, and pizza--especially the deep dish. When I went up to MI for college, I couldn't wait to come home for a visit, just to hit up Giordano's (best pizza) and Portillo's (hot dogs, cheese fries, shakes, Italian beef, etc) and do some pigging out.

I love hot dogs Chicago-style, though I generally leave off the relish. I think the celery salt is a great touch, and I eat 'em even though the onions give me tummyaches sometimes. There's a place near me called Fratello's, where you can get a Chi-style hot dog and a hug bag of fries for next to nothing. :D

As for MI, I miss Cottage Inn pizza--they had the best green olives and extra cheese pizza EVER. I also miss the cherries--we had dried TC cherries on the shelves at Meijer all the time.

And Zehnder's!! If you ever are dragged up to Frankenmuth, home of the biggest Christmas store ever, hit up Zehnders--the food is insane--fantastic fried chicken and huge portions. The meals come in courses, with cottage cheese (which I love) and all kinds of breads with jams and fruit butters. And after dinner, you can head down to the shop to buy most of what you just ate to take home--including the amazing cherry wines!

XCashier
06-25-2007, 01:46 AM
in arizona you can get the classic places the water stores or the interesting ice cream joints and they all have different kinds of ice cream and i love the different feel they all have.
If you're ever in Phoenix, try Mary Coyle's Ice Cream: http://www.marycoyle.net/visit.html Their Pumpkin Pie Ice Cream during the holiday season is heavenly. :)
Pizza. Ok, New York can shell out good pizza too, but anywhere out of there, and the grade of pizza just isn't the same.
No kidding. I've only been to New York twice, but they've had the best pizza I have ever tasted. Now in Eugene, I have yet to find a really good pizza here. Have yet to find any good Mexican or Chinese food here as well. :(

Good seafood, on the other hand, is easy to find. For some truly excellent fish & chips, try the Wild Salmon Fish & Chips at Fisherman's Market http://www.plankfish.com/plank_who.htm They also have flavored tartar sauces; my favorites are the Mediterranean Madness (olives, capers, roasted garlic & sun dried tomato tartar sauce) and Bombay Bomber (yellow curry tartar sauce). :)

ArenaBoy
06-25-2007, 02:10 AM
And Zehnder's!! If you ever are dragged up to Frankenmuth, home of the biggest Christmas store ever, hit up Zehnders--the food is insane--fantastic fried chicken and huge portions. The meals come in courses, with cottage cheese (which I love) and all kinds of breads with jams and fruit butters. And after dinner, you can head down to the shop to buy most of what you just ate to take home--including the amazing cherry wines!

Back when I ate meat I used to love going up to Frakenmuth. Don't forget Bronner's and the Bavarian Inn.

Myswtghst; I love Chicago style pizza, I ate at Pizzeria Deux when I was down there best pizza right up there with Buddy's and Shields in Detroit.

JustADude
06-25-2007, 02:31 AM
just to hit up Giordano's (best pizza)

Mom lives in Chi-town (works for the university) and took me to Giordano's when I visited her last time. I wasn't too impressed, but I think that's more because I let her pick the toppings. She's the kind of person that will somehow, instinctively, pick the worst item on the menu.

Kiwi
06-25-2007, 03:35 AM
I also grew up with sprite as lemonade, I got a mighty shock when the "real" stuff turned up.... although it is DELISHIOUS!!!!!!!

Although nothing beats aussie ginger beer.... soo good!

I can not WAIT to go down to the southern american states to try soul food.... it all sounds mouth watering, apart from grits and that crackling in a burrito thing.

Pagan
06-25-2007, 03:52 AM
Don't you rag on our effing architecture! A century and a half is pretty goddamn old for the west coast, especially when most cities just pull the things down and have done with it. You know nothing in this country measures up to Europe anyway.

Geez, ese, chill vato! :eek: I in no way was raggin’ on your architecture! Questioning the use of the word “ancient” isn’t disparaging the buildings themselves. There’s plenty of buildings (mostly missions) in California that are older that 150 yrs, seeing as it was a Spanish colony like NM. I was just wondering if you were being a bit sarcastic! I thought perhaps you were thinking just in terms of English colonization, as well.

Yes, there are places in Europe that are extremely old (i.e., the debris dating back 2000 yrs on Castle Rock in Edinburgh, Skara Brae in the Orkneys). But, Taos Pueblo (a World Heritage Site and a National Historic Landmark) has been inhabited for over 1000 yrs, Chaco Canyon (Anasazi) is over 1000 yrs old, Mesa Verde (Anasazi) may date back to 575 CE, some ruins Canyon de Chelly (Anasazi and Navajo) date back to 350 CE.

Plus, even though it’s not in the US, there are the ruins of a Viking settlement that dates to 1001 CE at L’Anse aux Meadows on Newfoundland in Canada.

So, yes, there are old things in Europe, but there’s a lot of old things here, too.

:rant:Sorry about the rant, but I get so peeved when people go on and on about nothing being old in the US. They’re usually talking about the East Coast and seem not to consider the pre-English/US history of the western part of the country!

JustADude
06-25-2007, 04:52 AM
I can not WAIT to go down to the southern American states to try soul food.... it all sounds mouth watering, apart from grits and that crackling in a burrito thing.

As a guy who grew up in the heart of Arkansas (oddly, the least hillbilly part of the state) you definitely need to hit the little hole-in-the wall places to get the best soul food. If the place looks professional, or tourist-folksy, go somewhere else, because the good stuff is served in places that cater to the blue-collar workers and have a 'homey' vibe to 'em.

If you go through North Little Rock in AR, DO NOT leave without swinging by JoJo's for pulled pork sandwiches I haven't found the better of in a decade of looking.

traylk
06-25-2007, 08:14 AM
As for MI, I miss Cottage Inn pizza--they had the best green olives and extra cheese pizza EVER. I also miss the cherries--we had dried TC cherries on the shelves at Meijer all the time.


OMG! I miss Meijer sooooo much:cry:! I wish they would expand faster and build one here.....lol

rdp78
06-26-2007, 12:32 AM
I also grew up with sprite as lemonade, I got a mighty shock when the "real" stuff turned up.... although it is DELISHIOUS!!!!!!!


Um, just wandering why was Sprite called lemonade. It just doesn't really make sense to me I mean there is a lemony taste to Sprite I just find it a bit odd. Then again people are finding the whole sweet tea a bit odd too :lol:.

Anyway about the real lemonade you can't beat the freshly made stuff and when my family was doing festivals (my parents own a candy company that sold cotton candy to local stores, it went out business in '99) we made fresh squeezed lemonade (sometimes limeade, once in awhile cherry lemonade). We had a commercial lemon squeezer that we still have and so we were able to make really good lemonade. I think we used about two lemons for the 16oz cups and maybe 3 limes for limeades. First we just squeezed the lemons when the customer ordered it but then well, we figure it was going to take way to long so presqueezed the fruit and put it in containers using ladles. I think one ladle for 2 lemons maybe one and half I can't remember. For the sugar, my dad made sugar water using large coffer maker and put it in a used sno-kone (yes, we sold those too) pump. It was three squits for one cup then we add ice and water after that we put it in a martini shaker (yes, we still have couple of those left) then shook it really good then it's poured in a plastic cup. I would note my dad was one who mainly did the lemonade.

Heck, it was so good when they were opening the Explore Park they ask my dad to make them many gallons (I don't know the exact amount but I think it was close to hundred) of lemonade for the grande opening. After that we did the food and drink for the park for few years before they got the tavern restuarant.

myswtghst
06-26-2007, 12:53 AM
OMG! I miss Meijer sooooo much:cry:! I wish they would expand faster and build one here.....lol

I was so happy that they built one out here the burbs around the time I moved home. I love being able to do my grocery shopping when I get off work at midnight. :D

Kiwi
06-26-2007, 01:51 AM
Um, just wandering why was Sprite called lemonade. It just doesn't really make sense to me I mean there is a lemony taste to Sprite I just find it a bit odd.

Sprite is a clear soda, lemon-lime flavored, caffeine free soft drink, produced by the Coca-Cola Company.

Im guessing thats why? I dont know, but I guess its just a cultural thing... just like where Im from if you asked for a soda or a pop people would stare at you confused, just like when I asked for a soft drink when I first visited the states.

rdp78
06-26-2007, 02:24 AM
Sprite is a clear soda, lemon-lime flavored, caffeine free soft drink, produced by the Coca-Cola Company.

Im guessing thats why? I dont know, but I guess its just a cultural thing... just like where Im from if you asked for a soda or a pop people would stare at you confused, just like when I asked for a soft drink when I first visited the states.

Well, this is the first time I heard people revering Sprite as lemonade so I didn't really understand it and yes, I assume it had to be a cultural thing. I tell ya I'm learning a lot about other culturals(even if they are in the same country:lol:) just on this thread, I'm thinking about making myself a Frito Pie (even through I'm trying to eat more healthy) one day it just sounds really good). Anyway I do call soft drinks soda most of the time.

Okay, speaking of good southern food my mom actually makes a pretty good okra and tomato dish (I think she uses the canned stuff) but it's much healthier then fried okra which is still good. I think she even uses okra in homemade soups sometimes.

Sofar
06-26-2007, 05:35 AM
Okay, maybe this is just the Northwest, but every name for the non-alcoholic drink produced by mixing seltzer and flavored syrup seems to fly here. At my register I get pop, soda, sodie-pop, soft drink, fountain drink, and the occasional "I'll have an grape dope." I really don't see what's so confusing about the matter, either. Certainly none of y'all in soda territory are really confused when someone asks for a pop?

By the way, anyone know where I can get good grits in Seattle?

traylk
06-26-2007, 09:02 AM
I was so happy that they built one out here the burbs around the time I moved home. I love being able to do my grocery shopping when I get off work at midnight. :D

Well I have a wallyworld right down the road but it's just not the same ya know?