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View Full Version : Well, this sucks


HorrorFrogPrincess
04-02-2009, 11:56 PM
I asked my supervisor at my quarterly performance evaluation if I NEEDED a car to keep this job. Turns out, yes, I do.

I asked because I was planning on moving in June. But I've only been driving for a year, so no matter what kind of car I get, the insurance will be about 300 a month. At this point, it's either get a car OR move out. If I move out, I can't afford a car, and won't be able to keep my job.

I run a lot of errands here, though I usually use a company car/truck/tank of death, but often someone else is using it, so I can't. So I take the car I currently drive.

It really sucks, though, that I can't stay if I don't have a car. I guess I'll just have to stay at home and bide my time until my premiums go down.

In, like, 2 years. :(

Geek King
04-03-2009, 02:40 PM
Yup, that's how it goes sometimes. If it helps, I think you made the right decision.

This also gives you more time to save up for the move, which always costs more than you expect. Hang in there, making it on your own is very satisfying if you can pull it off.

HorrorFrogPrincess
04-03-2009, 03:36 PM
Not a lot of choice in the matter. But my family is cool with me staying, so long as I keep my room clean. And I'll be getting a vacation from them in a couple weeks.

wagegoth
04-03-2009, 06:24 PM
The premium is going to be adjusted by the value of the car you drive. However, if you drive the car for your job, it can seriously raise your rates. You should talk to your employer and explain how much more car insurance will cost you if you have to drive your car for work. If they're willing to pay the difference, then that will help. If they're not, then you should talk to them about how much getting a car will cost you, in addition to the insurance, and while you love working for them, the additional cost will cut your take-home pay by [____]%. A lot of employers just forget how much these things cost, especially if they're making a lot more money than their lower level employees.

If they did not say that you had to have a car when you were hired, you should include that information when you talk with them.

Broomjockey
04-03-2009, 08:58 PM
This also gives you more time to save up for the move, which always costs more than you expect. Hang in there, making it on your own is very satisfying if you can pull it off.

Oh yeah. Furnishing my place cost $1500. And that was just to minimum standards. Well, MY minimum, which means massive shelving for my books. Then there's security deposit, etc etc. Nothing quite like sliding that key home in the lock of my front door though :D

HorrorFrogPrincess, don't worry if it takes longer than you want it to, just keep faith that it WILL happen. And it will be glorious.

SpyOne
04-03-2009, 09:44 PM
Lower insurance premiums are a lie!

When I was 18, they said I was paying more because I was under 21.
When I was 22, they said it was because I was single.
When I got married, they said it was because my wife didn't have a license.
When my wife got a license, they said it was because she was younger than me.

Each time, when i said that I had previously been told my rates would go down once I reached that benchmark, the agents looked at me like I had begun speaking Martian. "Lower rates for drives over 21? I've never heard of such a thing."

Keep this goal instead: if your car is paid for, either because you paid off the loan or because you bought an old used car and paid cash for it (or paid for it with a Personal Loan, instead of an Auto Loan), then you don't need Full Coverage: Collision (damage to your car that is your fault) and Theft insurance are usually optional, but the finance company insists on them because they want to get paid if your car is stolen or destroyed. If you think you are unlikely to drive into a tree, and that your car is unlikely to get stolen, you can save yourself a bundle right there.

wagegoth
04-03-2009, 10:55 PM
It depends on the insurance company. State Farm has been very fair with me, of course, I've been with the same agent for over twenty years. I got a complete runaround from Farmers. Many years ago, I was broke and my coverage through State Farm lapsed (different agent, didn't care to help). I had to pay extra to be reinsured, but Farmers said they would give me a discount after six months. They lied. I dropped them and went to a new State Farm agent. They've been mostly great, and the agent that bought that agent out is wonderful.


It's true you don't have to pay for collision or comprehensive if your car is paid for, however, consider how much the car is worth, not just money wise, but its worth for necessary transportation. Even if your car is only worth a $2,000 or $3,000 dollars, do you have that much money saved up and ready in case your car is totaled? The less your car is worth, the more likely it will be totaled by the insurance company. Even if the car is in decent shape and could be repaired, you will get nothing towards the repairs or replacement without collision insurance. If the car is repairable, you can salvage it and use the insurance settlement to repair it if you have coverage.

As for comprehensive, it's often a very small part of your bill. However, if a window is broken out, that $50 a year becomes a real bargain when the insurance company pays $300+ to replace the window.

HorrorFrogPrincess
04-03-2009, 11:20 PM
...massive shelving for my books.

Isn't that a necessity? :D

Thanks for the tips, everyone. I'll be saving so I can put at least half down on a car (whatever car I get).

Dawnchaser
04-04-2009, 06:43 AM
Lower insurance premiums are a lie!

When I was 18, they said I was paying more because I was under 21.
When I was 22, they said it was because I was single.
When I got married, they said it was because my wife didn't have a license.
When my wife got a license, they said it was because she was younger than me.


Wow, craziness.

Thank God my not having a license doesn't raise my husband's insurance costs...well, I've asked and they say it doesn't but who knows for sure, right?

Broomjockey
04-04-2009, 01:26 PM
Isn't that a necessity? :D


Well, for me it is. Takes up a whole freaking WALL! :eek: :D

HorrorFrogPrincess
04-04-2009, 03:48 PM
Well, for me it is. Takes up a whole freaking WALL! :eek: :D

*jealous* My G-parents have one of those in my room, but I only get, like, 3 shelves.

Mr_Bandwagon
04-04-2009, 10:44 PM
Oh yeah. Furnishing my place cost $1500. And that was just to minimum standards.

For me the biggest hidden expense when I got my first place out on my own was the deposit for the electricity. $506 :cry: because I had never had electric in my name before. I was completely blindsided by that one and it killed my moving budget.

Geek King
04-06-2009, 05:30 PM
Lower insurance premiums are a lie!
[ect.,ect.)


You seriously need to shop your insurance. I've been with Erie Insurance, and they drop my rates without my even having to ask. They have several different items that can lower rates--age of you, age of the car--stuff like that. I've been very happy with them, and that's not something I'd usually say about insurance. :lol:

I do have a good agent though, and he keeps an eye open for his customers.

stucksb
04-07-2009, 05:02 AM
Lower insurance premiums are a lie!

When I was 18, they said I was paying more because I was under 21.
When I was 22, they said it was because I was single.
When I got married, they said it was because my wife didn't have a license.
When my wife got a license, they said it was because she was younger than me.

Each time, when i said that I had previously been told my rates would go down once I reached that benchmark, the agents looked at me like I had begun speaking Martian. "Lower rates for drives over 21? I've never heard of such a thing."



:headscratch:
That is so weird. The Insurance company I'm with currently my husband has been using since he was old enough to drive. We got rental ins. through them and our car ins. dropped like a stone. I was added to his policy for a nominal amount and when we got married it dropped again. He even gets paid dividends from his payments every year. We have full coverage on a new vehicle and it costs us not a lot more than minimum coverage on my old vehicle did (I used a different company then). :shrug: I guess it really comes down to finding a really good insurance company.

Buglady
04-08-2009, 04:13 PM
Car insurance can be a real racket. I moved to Alberta after driving in BC for 6 years with a PERFECT record. Not even a parking ticket! I was getting a 40% discount on the base insurance rate from ICBC. Then I moved here, didn't bring my car because it was dying and wouldn't have passed the emissions inspection, and couldn't afford another car for two years.

So after two years, I went to get insurance lined up for the car I wanted, and they said, oh, no, you haven't had insurance for that long, that makes you high risk! You probably lost your license for DUI! Your insurance will be $3000/year. (I paid $800/year in BC!) I'm a 35 year old female with a perfect driving record and a college degree. What are they looking for??!

So I basically said screw it, told the car seller sorry, and bought a bike and a bus pass. I can rent a car several times a year for way less than insurance alone would cost me, never mind car payments and gas. (Funnily enough, the car rental places only care that I'm over 25, have a clean driving record, and have a credit card).

Then again, I didn't actually learn to drive till I was 26, so I never really became dependent on having a vehicle. Never needed to, as I lived in a city with excellent transit. And when I take transit I can get some extra reading time in!

HorrorFrogPrincess
04-08-2009, 05:37 PM
I only got my license last year (I'm 22 now).

I know part of it is the type of car you get. Any ideas on what to look for to get a lower rate?

Seshat
04-11-2009, 02:08 AM
Well, for me it is. Takes up a whole freaking WALL! :eek: :D

Only one? :devil:

Broomjockey
04-11-2009, 07:52 AM
Only one? :devil:

I'm 25, and only just moved in to my own apartment less than 30 days ago. Gimme time.