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McGoddess09
08-03-2009, 11:54 PM
For all those who know what college dorm life is like, I just want to know what I missed.

I bought all my school supplies and labeled them.
I bought my bedding,towels,washcloths,handtowels,eating utensils,a lamp,a hamper.
I already picked out what pictures,posters,and decorations I will take with me.
I applied for financial aid and picked out what I will be accepting (basically everything they offered me)
I talked to my roommate. We will be setting down rules at the end of the month.
I talked with my cellphone company to see if I would be roaming where I'm going. I'm not btw.
I have my laptop,virus protection software, and Microsoft works thing.
I bought totes to put everything in. I already started packing.
I've talked about travel arrangement with my mom. I won't be bringing my car with me.
I left a notice for a leave of absence at work and gave the schedule manager my email address and got hers so I can tell her when I am available to work.
I talked to my lady parts doctor and got my yearly exam, so I wouldn't have to deal with it at school. Also got my birth control prescription that I can get at any walmart. Big bonus!

I still have to buy toiletries. I have to make an appointment with my regular doctor for a yearly physical, my dentist for a cleaning, my eye doctor for a checkup, the bloodbank to make a donation, cash in my ginormous cup o' coins to have them changed into quarters.

Did I miss anything?

Kheldarson
08-04-2009, 12:05 AM
Stow away your sanity? You won't need it =P

But sounds like you got everything. Well, except maybe cleaning supplies. Communal bathroom or suite?

McGoddess09
08-04-2009, 12:12 AM
communal bathroom.

I count the cleaning supplies as toiletries. Should I bring a vaccum cleaner?

JoitheArtist
08-04-2009, 12:14 AM
2 things:

1. Duct tape.

2. WD-40


No, I'm really not kidding--I needed both of those often in college. In fact, after my first year of college, I made some care packages for friends who were just starting college--they all thanked me for including both items!

:)

McGoddess09
08-04-2009, 12:22 AM
WD-40,huh?

Duct tape, I have. Some pretty purple kind, I may add :angel:

BookstoreEscapee
08-04-2009, 12:24 AM
communal bathroom.

I count the cleaning supplies as toiletries. Should I bring a vaccum cleaner?

My school had a vacuum for each hall in the dorms. If your does, don't bother, because it'll just take up space in what is undoubtedly going to be a cramped space. (My dorm had the biggest rooms on campus but with two people it's still a squeeze.) A small broom and dustpan can be handy, though, if the room isn't carpeted (mine wasn't but we could bring them if we wanted. One girl basically did wall to wall carpeting in her room and even carpeted the steps on her loft ladder :p). I didn't bother with carpeting until my second semester (which was a good thing, after the great beer flood of October Somethingth... that was fun to come home to at 1am :rolleyes:) Make sure you and the roomie won't be bringing duplicates of shared items.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
08-04-2009, 12:25 AM
communal bathroom.

I count the cleaning supplies as toiletries. Should I bring a vaccum cleaner?

If the room is carpeted, that's probably a good idea. Otherwise you have to crawl into your RA to borrow one. A small stick one should suffice. I needed a bigger one because I was in an apartment.

Bring some cheap sandals or flip flops for the communal bathroom. I never had a communal bathroom while in college, but my college seems to be the exception to the rule there.

Kheldarson
08-04-2009, 12:25 AM
Vacuum cleaner? Nah. One of those rolling sweeper things, sure. Unless you have one of those really tiny travel vacs. Those are cool. Frankly, I only vacuumed when I left. Too much out and going on to do it any other time. But that was me.

Docmayhem
08-04-2009, 12:33 AM
2 things:

1. Duct tape.

2. WD-40


No, I'm really not kidding--I needed both of those often in college. In fact, after my first year of college, I made some care packages for friends who were just starting college--they all thanked me for including both items!

:)

Seconded for emphasis.

Also, a good swiss army knife (i.e. Wenger or Victorinox) because you never know when you will need a screwdriver, a scissors, a tweezer, a bottle opener, a can opener...

4love
08-04-2009, 12:40 AM
Small fan, unless you have AC there. Will they let you have a microwave? Fridge? Or will there be a student-accessible kitchen you feel you can trust? These are things to coordinate with roommate.

T.V. not really necessary, but can be nice, depending on your watching habits.

Alarm clocks are good. Speaking of which, bring one of those sleep-eye-cover-things, headphones, and some earplugs, in case roommate's circadian rhythms differ significantly from yours. Saved my sanity Freshman year.

BookstoreEscapee
08-04-2009, 12:45 AM
If you can get some, wrap any fragile stuff in bubble wrap. Then you have stress relief for later. :D

My mom used to send me care packages and would wrap stuff in bubble wrap so I could pop it. I shared with my friends. :)

AdminAssistant
08-04-2009, 01:49 AM
You should be able to get on the official university's bookstore's website. Get on there, find out what books you'll need, and how much (approximately) they'll cost. Chances are you can get them cheaper elsewhere, but it's always good to have a ballpark. And, as Lupo can tell you, keep your receipt until after the first day of class. Professors sometimes change books last minute.

As part of your rules, set a mandated "quiet time" for reading/studying. Some really good headphones for your laptop might not be a bad idea. Also, take advantage of the things your college offers. Chances are you can get your BC prescription cheaper at the student pharmacy (assuming your college has a health clinic with it's own pharmacy). If you need to go to the doc, go to the health clinic! You pay fees for it, might as well use it. Ditto the gym, library, etc. You probably had to buy a meal plan (we always had to when we stayed in the dorm), be sure to use that, too. Although, I know, college food gets old after a while. I can't remember if you said you were bringing one, but a mini-fridge and microwave are really handy. And....the Freshmen 15 is a stark reality. Sucks.

That's all I can think of, but I am a professional student and have had some time on both ends of the college experience for a while now. So, if you have any questions, I'll be happy to lend you whatever advice I can think of. Best of luck!

Soulstealer
08-04-2009, 01:52 AM
Have you killed your loan officer and left his head as a sign for the next guy they assign to you? There are some days with my student loan that I contemplate that.

Shpepper
08-04-2009, 02:43 AM
A small tool kit. Hammer, flat and phillips head screwdrivers, pair of pliers, a few nails and some assorted screws. That way if anything needs to be fixed or tightened you have it all right there.

But most of all be sure to take along your sense of humor. You will need that all the time.

MaggieTheCat
08-04-2009, 03:21 AM
I never lived in a college dorm, but my boyfriend did. He asked about a microwave and video games. :lol: I don't know how dorms work, especially your dorm, but I would look into the microwave, and possibly a mini fridge and a crock pot if you have space and they are allowed. You can do TONS of quick, easy, delicious, and healthy meals with a crockpot. Dump all the ingredients in before class in the morning and come home to stew, or spaghetti, or pulled pork for sandwiches, when you get back.

Aethian
08-04-2009, 03:56 AM
One thing I learned was plan out your day and let people know when your going to be studying and making notes. That way near exam time your not stressing because you already have your notes ready.

Also, MAKE A BUDGET that was a big life saver to me when it was a few days till payday and I still had money left. And remember most loads of laundry are good at the lowest line on the cap. Softner sheets can be streched out by cutting in half. The best time to do laundry is mid day if you don't have class. And stay down their with your laundry with a book to read with a timer so you can watch your stuff.

OOO Another good thing is one of those white boards you can put on your door. Use one color for you and one for the roomie unless you each plan on having one. That way you can say if your In or not.

AdminAssistant
08-04-2009, 04:07 AM
: I don't know how dorms work, especially your dorm, but I would look into the microwave, and possibly a mini fridge and a crock pot if you have space and they are allowed.

No dorm I've ever heard of allowed anything but microwaves. On the other hand, there's no exposed cooking element on a crock-pot, so maybe. Still, I'd say if you're already paying for it, let the caf do the cooking for you. :) I under-utilized that stuff my first round through college, and I know now how much more money I would've had if I'd just ate at the caf more.

JoitheArtist
08-04-2009, 06:19 AM
A small tool kit. Hammer, flat and phillips head screwdrivers, pair of pliers, a few nails and some assorted screws. That way if anything needs to be fixed or tightened you have it all right there.



Agreed. Make sure your toolkit also has needle-nose pliers. Most useful tool EVER.

gremcint
08-04-2009, 07:05 AM
You can get a minifridge that locks, I have one, I got it on sale at futureshop.

Password your computer and wireless.

Amazon save me 100 dollars one semester on books. Printer paper is cheaper by the case and doesn't go bad.

Batteries are always good to have. I found getting a small brush and dustpan useful and you can get them at the dollar store. If you have access to a vehicle then go a week with what you have and everytime you think of something write it down and then go shopping on the weekend.

Boggles
08-04-2009, 09:04 AM
Padlocks.

When I went to uni all the rooms had a cupboard with a hasp fitted so you could put a padlock on for securing stuff. Don't know if there'll be anything like that but it could be worth bearing in mind.

taxguykarl
08-04-2009, 03:14 PM
And, as Lupo can tell you, keep your receipt until after the first day of class. Professors sometimes change books last minute.Not only that, sometimes the instructor will use so little of the textbook that photocopying those chapters will be cost-effective. More often than not the copies in the campus libraries cost less than a certain copy shop chain. After my first semister, I learned not to buy the book 'til after I received a course syllabus. One exception: Find out which instructors are Kingsfield (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0070509/) wanabees (every department seems to have one)--you will want to read the first couple chapters then. Those are ones who deviate from the unwritten rule: The first day of class is ground rules and a lecture.

Depending on the size of your campus a couple good pairs of walking shoes--I went through one of two pairs per semister.

Also a subscription to the campus newspaper--if your institution offers proficiency tests, that's the first place to check for announcements (not to boast, but I tested out a semister that way:D). You will be pleasantly surprised how easy some of them are--you may have already covered the material in HS.

Buy a day planner if you haven't already.

I agree with the other poster who suggest a way to secure your things. My wife had the problem of a pilfering roommate. My old gf's campus residence was burglarized.

AdminAssistant
08-04-2009, 03:21 PM
Not only that, sometimes the instructor will use so little of the textbook that photocopying those chapters will be cost-effective. More often than not the copies in the campus libraries cost less than a certain copy shop chain. After my first semister, I learned not to buy the book 'til after I received a course syllabus.

The one problem with that plan is that, at least at my current college, the bookstores sell out of gen ed titles quickly. There are...4 or 5 bookstores (this is a fairly large campus, lots of students) and none of them ever order enough books. I'd go ahead, get the books, then return ones you don't need. Just in case.

taxguykarl
08-04-2009, 03:38 PM
The one problem with that plan is that, at least at my current college, the bookstores sell out of gen ed titles quickly. There are...4 or 5 bookstores (this is a fairly large campus, lots of students) and none of them ever order enough books. I'd go ahead, get the books, then return ones you don't need. Just in case.That can work if most of the book is used. I had mostly sciences and there were plenty of them in my college days.

Broomjockey
08-04-2009, 04:03 PM
I'd like to second the small fan part. Dorms can get stuffy, especially ones with electric heaters. So in the dead of winter, you're not going to want to open a window and lose your heat. A small fan on low can circulate the air nicely.

thegiraffe
08-04-2009, 04:53 PM
If it's a communal bathroom (i.e. down the hall), you may not need cleaning supplies. I lived in a dorm like that my first two years, and the college provided housekeeping service for common areas. If you're in a suite where the bathroom is only used by the people in that suite or whatever, you'll have to clean it. We also had a central vacuum system, so you may want to check on that.

As far as fridge/microwave (almost ALL dorms allow those), coordinate with your roommate. Have you seen the dorm? Make sure everything will fit!

I tend to have a lot going on, so I got a dry-erase calendar with some white sticky-tac (your best friend) to stick it on my wall. I color-coded notebooks and markers for every class and wrote down all assignments due, then had a separate dry erase board for my to-do list next to it. REALLY kept me in-shape. Do you have a laptop? You may want to invest in a locking cord. Most colleges also have wireless all around campus - make sure it's wireless compatible (again, if you have a laptop). Also make sure you have a CAT-5 (ethernet) cord.

Check with your profs on Microsoft Works also. Sometimes you have to submit assignments via email, and most want it in Microsoft Office (word/powerpoint/etc) form. Many also post notes/outlines/powerpoints online, and you want to make sure you can open it. You can get Microsoft Student for like 100 bucks through the college usually. It'll save you MANY headaches.

Meal plan? You gotta eat, and I guarantee that you won't want to cook a lot. It's much easier to be able to grab stuff and go.

FLASHLIGHT! It seems dumb, but the power goes out sometimes, and it can be crazy dark in the hallways.

Umbrella for treks across campus during a storm? I went to college in Tampa where it rains every afternoon, but something to think about.

I lived on campus all 4 (well, 3.5) years in a variety of situations, so I've become a bit of a pro.

Broomjockey
08-04-2009, 05:11 PM
As far as fridge/microwave (almost ALL dorms allow those), coordinate with your roommate.

I'd double-check that. Mine didn't allow mini-fridge, supposedly because of the electrical load, but that was BS. Theoretically, the dorm should sent you a list of contraband. If they haven't, call them and ask if they can. There's sometimes really random items on there.

McGoddess09
08-04-2009, 05:21 PM
Microwaves and fridges are already provided :angel: Plus, my dorm hall and one other have a kitchens on every floor.

As for a vaccum, I'll wait til I get there to see if I need one.

I am bringing dusting stuff and disinfectant wipes. I can't stand dust!

I have a whiteboard calender, a purse planner, and a binder planner my grandpa gave me, plus the free planner they give us at the textbook center.

As for books, the school will allow us to rent books, which will be much cheaper in the long run.

And I talked to my roommate about sleeping schedules and we are on the same one! She says she's in bed around 10, same as me (usually). She told me about her last roommate who would wake her at 2 am, working on things to join a sorority.

Headphones for my laptop, I have. That's how I watch my movies anyway.

I also have a mini leatherman tool that I never leave anywhere without.

thegiraffe
08-04-2009, 05:47 PM
I think you're set!

OH!!! Super-important!

Check to see if the mattresses are regular twin or twin-XL. I had regular twin beds my first 2 years, and T-XLs my last year and a half. It's a gigantic pain to fit regular twin sheets on T-XLs, and vice-versa, they don't stay on. I also recommend a REAL mattress pad (the ones down here are literally a piece of felt with diagonal elastics on them - they're really cruddy) and an egg-crate pad. Our mattresses were SO hard...the egg-crate pad made them comfortable.

On the side of luxury, I like lap desks. It keeps the computer off my lap (mine gets warm!), and I have issues with desks. I much prefer to do work on the couch or bed. Just a personal thing, but a thought nonetheless.

AdminAssistant
08-04-2009, 06:05 PM
Check with your profs on Microsoft Works also. Sometimes you have to submit assignments via email, and most want it in Microsoft Office (word/powerpoint/etc) form. Many also post notes/outlines/powerpoints online, and you want to make sure you can open it. You can get Microsoft Student for like 100 bucks through the college usually. It'll save you MANY headaches.

Yes, yes, and YES. I let students e-mail assignments to me if they want me to give them a looksee before handing it in. I can't tell you the times I haven't been able to open a file because it was Works, WordPerfect, or some random open-source thing that my computer wouldn't open. Besides, if you do your printing at the library, chances are the computers there are a) all PC's and b) have Word. And you may even be able to check out the software for free, depending on the deal that your university has made with Microsoft.

I also recommend a REAL mattress pad (the ones down here are literally a piece of felt with diagonal elastics on them - they're really cruddy) and an egg-crate pad. Our mattresses were SO hard...the egg-crate pad made them comfortable.

Depending on when your dorm chooses to turn on the heat, an electric blanket's not a bad investment, either. Most won't allow space heaters due to the exposed heat elements.

Darkwolf
08-04-2009, 06:34 PM
I second Irv on the cheap sandals/flip flops for the bathroom. You really don't want to know what is growing on that floor

gremcint
08-04-2009, 07:04 PM
My sister's new computer came with MS works and after about half an hour of using it we switched to office, there were so many cases where the program went out of its way to hinder you that it was honestly just a piece of crap. Either get open office or ms office.

BookstoreEscapee
08-05-2009, 01:19 AM
On calendars:

My campus learning center put out a blank weekly schedule with the standard class times blocked out, and you could stop in and pick up copies. Easy enough to do this in Excel or Word if your school doesn't have something like that. It really came in handy, since classes were 50 minutes, or an hour and 15, and you could get a better visual representation of your day. I used clear Contact paper to laminate a copy, then wrote in my schedule each week with overhead projector pens; they wash off with water (don't use dry erase markers on Contact paper). I also went through all my syllabuses (syllabi?) each semester and made a master list of all my major assignments in order of due date, so I could see everything for all my classes at one glance. I kept both posted next to a big wall calendar. Which I decorated with fun stickers. :D

Anriana
08-05-2009, 03:20 AM
A surge protecter.
Non-perishable snack food - dried fruit, energy bars, MREs, whatever.
Glade plug-ins.

McGoddess09
08-05-2009, 02:33 PM
D'oh! I meant MS office, not works. I decided to get the Student/Teacher Edition.

I really thought about it and I decided I SHOULD get an electric blanket, since the school is in WI.

Oh definitely with the flipflops. Got myself a nice blue pair for the showers.

My school sent a catalog for sheets and value packs. I didn't get those because I could get it cheaper elsewhere and the beds are XL twin. Walmart has been my friend for back to school.

thegiraffe
08-05-2009, 02:40 PM
Good call on not buying the catalog stuff - it's CRAZY expensive!!! I suppose you have snow gear and the like...that would be on my "to-buy" list!

I agree on the surge protector. Extension cords (indoor grounded ones - with the 3-holes) are also not a bad idea because plugs tend to be in idiotic places in dorm rooms. I live in Florida and am a wuss when it comes to cold, but a throw blanket to snuggle up with would definitely be on my list.

Whoever said video games, I second that. We had an N64 in my apartment in college and we would blow off steam by having all-out mario kart wars on it.

Do you have a laptop case? I used to spend the weekends camped out in the starbucks in the library knocking out all my homework. I also liked to take it to class. If you want a good 2-in-1, North Face makes awesome backpacks that have laptop sleeves. They're also load-leveling, so you can haul your books and whatnot around and not wind up hunched over. Mine was like 80 bucks, but they do sell cheaper ones.

AdminAssistant
08-05-2009, 03:43 PM
Walmart has been my friend for back to school.

It was always mine! I remember shortly after moving in the same dorm with all of my friends, we went on a massive grocery run at Wal-Mart at something like 1 in the morning. :lol: Ah, memories. Y'know, I think they have those jersey sheets in Twin XL, always loved those.

Oh, and whatever you do, don't do what I just did and wait until late July to file your FAFSA. *sigh* Luckily, they've processed it and there shouldn't be a problem, but I was really worried there for a few days. :o

Jester
08-05-2009, 04:02 PM
McG, I had a whole bunch of posts in this thread quoted, and then I said screw it and ditched them all.

There is a lot of good advice offered here. But the problem is, these people are all coming from their own college and dorm experiences, and your college and your dorm may be nothing like theirs. If you were going to my alma mater (GO SUN DEVILS!), I would be able to help you with so many things. But what worked at ASU and in Saguaro Hall may not work so well where you are going.

Whatever you do, do not go out and buy everything suggested here. Some of it you may need, some of it you may not. My suggestion would be to bookmark this thread in your computer, and once you get to your dorm and your school, use it as a reference point. Is your dorm room stuffy? Then go get a fan. If not, it would be a silly purchase. Also remember that your roommate may have things that the room needs only one of, just as you may have stuff for it she doesn't have.

Go in with an open mind, and ready to take notes, physical and mental. (i.e., "Oh, the sun shines really brightly through our window due to our exposure...perhaps my roommate would like to go halfsies on some drapes/curtains/whatever.")

Some suggestions from my experiences in school would include some things that have already been suggested, or that you already have procured. Mini fridge is awesome, and the fact that your dorm has them AND kitchens makes me hate you so very much. (We had to buy our own damn mini-fridges, and kitchens? Please. Not.) Greaseboards are good, not just in your room, but on the outside of your door, for leaving or receiving messages. One minor thing I did was to color code my notebooks, i.e., blue for science, red for math, green for journalism, etc. How do you decide what color is what? Doesn't matter. Just like your speed dials in your phone, within a few days you will know which is for which. Also, since you won't have a car, you might want to look into a bicycle, depending on the size of your campus. (Mine was large.) If you get a bike, get a crappy one with a great lock. No one, after all, is going to go through the effort of getting through a great lock to get an old jalopy of a bike. Also, you may want to look into getting front or rear baskets for said bike, not just for school, but for hauling groceries home from the store. Also perhaps a power strip or two. Between a computer, a cell phone charger, a lamp, an alarm clock, a tv, a radio, etc., etc., etc., you can have a lot to plug in.

But again, don't go buying the farm until you have assessed just exactly what YOU will need in YOUR dorm room at YOUR college. There are some great suggestions here, but not all of them will be necessary for you. Use this is a guide, not as gospel. Listen to your profs for what you will need for their classes, and consider the advice of your RA in your dorm. Most of them are very cool and knowledgable, though just like any other group of people, understand that some of them are complete and total tools.

Good luck, and check back here so we know how it is going with you!

MaggieTheCat
08-05-2009, 05:38 PM
If you get a bike, get a crappy one with a great lock. No one, after all, is going to go through the effort of getting through a great lock to get an old jalopy of a bike.

Not entirely true, unfortunately. :( When my boyfriend was a senior in college, someone stole his bike. His bike, that he always had TWO chains and TWO locks on; his bike, which he had owned since high school, so it wasn't exactly new. He was a very sad panda.

...since the school is in WI.

I am so sorry for you. :p I can only hope you're going to some place like Madison that's at least in the southern part of the state. The further north you go, the worse it gets in the winter, and yes, even a couple hundred miles makes a HUGE difference. Madison, for example, is relatively mild; sure, they still get snow and their fair share of cold temperatures. But where I'm from (about 3-4 hours north of Madison) it easily gets to be -65 degrees with windchill and a constant sheet of ice on the road 'cuz the sun is only ever out long enough to start to melt it, and then it all re-freezes. This happened to use for a good two weeks last winter. I'm not sure how cold Madison got at that time, but they're on average a bit warmer.

Anyway, winter gear will be essential. Keep in mind that if and when it does get blisteringly cold like that, you won't want to be outside for long. You can get frostbite in like 10 minutes when it's that cold. Basically you'll want to get to your classes and get back to your dorm as fast as possible. Don't even think about going biking anywhere like the store if it gets that cold.

Jester
08-05-2009, 06:28 PM
His bike, that he always had TWO chains and TWO locks on...

There is a good part of the problem. Chains are garbage. I could get through a good chain in under 30 seconds, and I am not even a professional. The only good bike lock is a U-lock or similar type lock. Chains and cables are jokes. And I know, U-locks are not guarantees, and they can be defeated....but the effort to defeat them is high, and generally the cost to effect ratio is too high for a bike thief to get through them to get at a POS bike.

it easily gets to be -65 degrees with windchill...

You can get frostbite in like 10 minutes when it's that cold. Basically you'll want to get to your classes and get back to your dorm as fast as possible. Don't even think about going biking anywhere like the store if it gets that cold.

I do not envy y'all, and it's times like this that I am glad I attend Arizona State University, and not Midwest Frozen Tundra State University! :lol:

Irving Patrick Freleigh
08-05-2009, 11:05 PM
I am so sorry for you. :p

Knowing where she's going, I feel even sorrier. :D

I could tell a few stories.

BookstoreEscapee
08-06-2009, 12:24 AM
Jester makes a good point. I was going to say, as far as bedding and wintery stuff, unless you won't have any opportunity to go home before the cold weather hits, don't bother bringing too many extra blankets and stuff like that. I started out with 2 sets of sheets and a bedspread, and a little throw blanket that I could wrap around me and drag around the dorm to my friends' rooms. When I went home for fall break in the beginning of October, I brought back an extra blanket for my bed and more of my winter clothes, and left some of my summer stuff at home. No point in taking up space for months with out-of-season stuff if you don't have to.

Also, to make laundry slightly easier...I pretty much only used one set of sheets. I'd wash 'em, dry 'em, and put 'em right back on my bed (hell, I still do that). The second set came in handy when my roommate's friend spilled a half-can of beer on my bed, though (which was a different incident than the Great Beer Flood of October Somethingth...and you wonder why my first roomie and I didn't last...:rolleyes:).

Greenday
08-06-2009, 12:33 AM
Just did three years in dorms. Now I'm going to be in an apartment thank God.

Flip flops are a must. If you are in your room, going barefoot is fine. But TWICE, I made the mistake of leaving my room without flipflops and I got a fungal infection. Tis gross.

Something to carry laundry in is a must.

Something to carry stuff to the shower, like shampoo, conditioner, body wash, etc. Makes carrying it all much easier.

Not going to repeat everyone else. But the two major ones I WILL repeat are surge protectors with multiple outlets and a small tool kit. My pocket knife (which in retrospect wasn't really allowed) was huge. That screwdriver on it got a lot of use.

Other than that, just pick stuff up as you need. Honestly, I'll give you the BARE essentials: bed sheets, pillow, clothes, laptop/computer. Everything after that isn't a MUST, unless they don't give you a fridge and/or microwave.

Der Cute
08-06-2009, 12:34 AM
The practical part of me says "INVENTORY".

Create a spreadsheet with serial numbers, model, name, etc on it, and $$ price.
Record your laptop's sn on that spreadsheet. Along with radio and other stuff above $50.

Print it out and leave copy at home? Keep copy in filing cabinet in your dorm room. If some schmuck takes your lappy, you can file report with cops & RA asap.

So far, so good...

Cutenoob

BookstoreEscapee
08-06-2009, 12:43 AM
The practical part of me says "INVENTORY".

Create a spreadsheet with serial numbers, model, name, etc on it, and $$ price.
Record your laptop's sn on that spreadsheet. Along with radio and other stuff above $50.

Print it out and leave copy at home? Keep copy in filing cabinet in your dorm room. If some schmuck takes your lappy, you can file report with cops & RA asap.

So far, so good...

Cutenoob

I kept a list like that; one copy at home but I also had one of those small fireproof lockboxes that I kept stashed in the back of my closet shelf with all my important stuff in it.

gremcint
08-06-2009, 01:40 AM
keep your receipts for all of your items with a warranty, it may suck having to be without them when they break but it will suck even more having to pay for a replacement. Most important don't be afraid to tell people no, or to get out, you are there for your education not theirs and people will try to take advantage of you.

Jester
08-06-2009, 05:41 AM
Create a spreadsheet with serial numbers, model, name, etc on it, and $$ price.
Record your laptop's sn on that spreadsheet. Along with radio and other stuff above $50.

Print it out and leave copy at home? Keep copy in filing cabinet in your dorm room. If some schmuck takes your lappy, you can file report with cops & RA asap.

One good place to keep it would be online. Maybe just a draft in your email account or a file stashed away on a website of yours. So that even if they steal your laptop or something untoward happens to it, you can still access your inventory without, say, waking your parents at 3 am to retrieve it.

Just at thought.

Shpepper
08-06-2009, 06:34 AM
I just thought of one more thing and I'm not sure if someone else mentioned it or not so I will. A Sewing kit: needles, thread, buttons, safety pins, masking tape (for a quick hem that won't leave lots of sticky on your clothes), scissors and clear nail polish.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
08-06-2009, 09:33 AM
I just thought nof one more thing and I'm not sure if someone else mentioned it or not so I will. A Sewing kit: needles, thread, buttons, safety pins, masking tape (for a quick hem that won't leave lots of sticky on your clothes), scissors and clear nail polish.

Mine came in handy several times for sewing buttons back on my coat and my work pants.

When winter comes, a humidifier may really come in handy. It was damn dry in my apartment every winter.

Shpepper
08-06-2009, 06:11 PM
Mine came in handy several times for sewing buttons back on my coat and my work pants.

When winter comes, a humidifier may really come in handy. It was damn dry in my apartment every winter.
If all you ever used it for was that, it was still worth it to have it. Another trick for temp replacement of a button is a twisty tie that comes with plastic bags. strip the paper off the wire and feed it through the button and your clothes.. works for a short time only but it's better than nothing sometimes.

trailerparkmedic
08-06-2009, 10:04 PM
I want to second the duct tape and small tool kit. Also, a small medical kit (bandaids, neosporin, etc) and food that you can store at room temperature and cook in a microwave.

You also may want to consider one of those foldy camp chairs. Dorms never seem to have enough space to sit, and it will keep at least one person off the floor!

Der Cute
08-07-2009, 12:44 AM
List:

1. First aid kit
2. Duct tape
3. Sewing kit (size of a deck of cards)
4. wd-40
5. Microwave
6. leatherman
7. flipflops
8. flashlight
9. alarm clock (besides the phone!)
10. surge protector
11. inventory :)
12. plate, knives, cup, fork, spoon


Good luck
cutenoob

McGoddess09
08-07-2009, 05:13 PM
Thank you all for the advice. I have basically everything I need. As for the other stuff, I'm gonna wait to see if I truly need it. As Jester said, my dorm experience will be different. I was just seeing what everyone would say in common.

Again, I really appreciate the advice and support. In 22 days, I have to move in and it's gonna be a hard day. I have to be at the college by 8 am, so I can spend more time with my family before they kick them out so I can do orientation. My little sister has already began the crying. She didn't want to go school supply shopping with my mom and I because she said it reminds her that I will be leaving soon.

I will be coming home every third weekend of the month, except during the winter, which may be a bit more difficult. I told my sister that any weekend that mom lets her, she can come stay the night.

My schedule is crazy!

Mondays: Speech 8 am-9:52; English 12 pm-12:52; History lecture 2 pm-2:52; Psychology 3 pm-4:18

Tuesdays: Math 2:30 pm-3:52

Wednesdays: History discussion 11 am-11:52; English 12 pm-12:52; History lecture 2 pm- 2:52; Psychology 3 pm-4:18

Thursdays: Math 2:30 pm-3:52

Fridays : English 12 pm-12:52

14 credits! I am a full time student! W00t!

BookstoreEscapee
08-08-2009, 04:35 AM
:52? :18? That's weird... My school's classes were always like 1:00 to 1:50, or 1:30-2:20, or if they were two days a week they were like 1:00-2:15 or 2:30-3:45.

Bandit
08-08-2009, 04:45 AM
9. alarm clock (besides the phone!)


Couple of clock options - I know that's the hardest part of college/uni - getting up at different times every day.

Set this one (http://www.thinkgeek.com/homeoffice/lights/9bac/) for every day on it's own schedule.

And these are clocks that will always be correct (http://www.radiocontrolledclock.com/rcalarmclocks.html) when they are first set up correctly.

I know I sound like Doc Brown, but the first key to getting through college is to first be able to GET to class in the first place. :)

And yeah - Good Luck!

B

Jester
08-08-2009, 04:45 AM
I told my sister that any weekend that mom lets her, she can come stay the night.

Make sure you check with the dorm on their rules about overnight guests. Not that I think you should abide by them if you say your sister can't stay, but so you know how to get around them if they say that!

Also, make sure you check with your roommate about such overnights. The worst person to piss off in college is the person who shares your living space!

My schedule is crazy!

A couple things about this.

First, make sure you know not only where your classes are, but also the best way to get from one to the other. I say this because you have many spots in your class schedule where you only have 8 minutes from the end of one class to the beginning of the next. I don't know how big your campus is, but even on a small campus, it can be time-consuming to get out of one building, across campus, and into another building...especially if the winters there are the way that has been described here. I had to deal with some short breaks at ASU, where we don't even deal with snow or ice, there is rarely rain, the campus is very bike-friendly, and the campus is self-contained, rather than being spread throughout town.

The second thing is a suggestion: night classes. Or I should say, night class. I found in my time at ASU that, when possible, making one of my classes each semester a night class was very beneficial. It cleared up a lot of time in the rest of my schedule and it was only one night a week. Of course, since it WAS only one night a week, we did a lot more per session, and the classes were each 3 hours long. So if you do go the night class route, I recommend that you do so with classes that are interesting to you, not something that could potentially put you to sleep.

And whatever else happens, remember the one absolute rule of dorm life: when you send the person who is of age or has a good fake ID to the store to buy booze for you and your friends, it is customary for y'all to purchase an additional six-pack or small bottle of whatever the buyer's preference is as their reward. Since, you know, they're not supposed to be buying alcohol for underaged people in the first place. :lol:

BookstoreEscapee
08-08-2009, 04:51 AM
Heh, my college's class schedule allowed 10-15 minutes (assuming you had back-to-back classes) between classes (depending on whether it was M-W-F or Tu-Th); that was enough time for me to get all the way across campus if need be.

One semester my friend and I had two classes in a row, in the same room, with the same professor (Medieval Lit and History of the English Language - we also got to read Beowulf in both classes, though not at the same time. In two different translations, even, since HEL was a senior-level majors-only class, and Medieval Lit was available to non-majors as well). The first day of class, we were sitting in the front row right in front of the prof's table (he was my favorite prof); Medieval Lit ended and everyone got up to leave. The prof, my friend and I just stayed in our seats. :p

AdminAssistant
08-08-2009, 05:25 AM
Also, make sure you check with your roommate about such overnights. The worst person to piss off in college is the person who shares your living space!

This, this, this

I had a roomie who would let her skank of a friend stay over all the time, without asking me. The one who said to my face that she thought anyone getting an arts related degree was "wasting their time and state money". And they'd stay up till 1 am on school nights talking and shit. gaahhhh!!! Happily, that roomie decided to get an apartment with skank friend around Spring Break, so I got to solo the rest of the year. Score!

Oh, and since Jester has already mentioned the booze thing, check with the rules on how and when the RA's inspect your room. Chances are you'll be inspected once or twice a semester, and they may or may not give you a warning depending on the college, the state, and how cool your RA is. At my university, during an inspection they couldn't open any drawers to rifle through your stuff. I kept my liquor in a lunch box, in my closet. Not that I would encourage such activities :angel: but be aware that they can and do check out rooms and bust you for what they find. Which, I think is ridiculous, since they allow booze at the frat parties but *grumble mumble grumble mumble*

McGoddess09
08-08-2009, 02:58 PM
I can have my sister overnight and my roommate is cool with it, as she will be going home every weekend to work. She lives 45 min away from the college, so too far to commute, but can still go home every weekend. :D

BookstoreEscapee
08-08-2009, 04:05 PM
Not that I would encourage such activities :angel: but be aware that they can and do check out rooms and bust you for what they find. Which, I think is ridiculous, since they allow booze at the frat parties but *grumble mumble grumble mumble*

Wow. We didn't get inspected; we were expected to act like adults and our rooms were our rooms. The only inspection was after moving out to check for damage. The rules on alcohol were that we could have it in our rooms as long as everyone in the room was over 21. As long as you didn't cause of trouble, they wouldn't say anything.

Jester
08-08-2009, 08:19 PM
We were not supposed to have alcohol in our dorm rooms if we were underage, which most of us were, but as long as we didn't cause trouble or were really obvious about it, most of the RA's were pretty cool about the whole thing. The only room inspections I remember for my own room (I rarely caused trouble!) was end of the semester for damages and whatnot.

Heh, my college's class schedule allowed 10-15 minutes (assuming you had back-to-back classes) between classes (depending on whether it was M-W-F or Tu-Th); that was enough time for me to get all the way across campus if need be.

Different campuses are different. I often had only ten minutes between classes, but ASU's campus is not exactly small....and it was rather congested with pedestrians, bicyclists, and roller bladers. And there were areas where you were not supposed to ride your bike (not that that usually stopped most of us, of course). And that was in the late Eighties/early Nineties. The campus is bigger and even more congested now....I can only imagine how tough it is to have a class on one end of campus let out and then have ten minutes to get out of the building, get to your bike, unlock it, get rolling, get through traffic, get to the building of your next class, find a parking spot for your bike (no easy feat with all the bikes on campus!), lock the bike up, and get into your classroom on time.

McG, I hope your campus is a lot smaller and less congested than mine was....especially since I doubt a bike is an efficient mode of transit during the winter months up there!

blas
08-08-2009, 08:34 PM
Dorms and bathrooms that have to be shared by tons of people? Please for the love of GOD buy some flip flops or thongs for the showers!

The only advice I can offer is if you need tips for sleeping (you never know when the people above or below you will be trying to rumble or party at 2 am!) or how to cheat but still eat well on a budget, I'm here for you.

I wouldn't believe the myth that southern Wisconsin gets milder winters than northern Wisconsin. This winter could always be different and go back to the old school ways, but the past two winters, places like Madison and other southern Wisconsin areas have had MORE snow and worse conditions than northern Wisconsin areas.

McGoddess09
08-10-2009, 12:39 AM
Oh Blas, trust me, I know about those winters. I live two blocks from the border of WI and the winters are the same as Northern WI.

I definitely am going to be using flipflops. I hate being barefoot except in grass or underwater, like in a pool or the ocean or in bed.

Bella_Vixen
08-19-2009, 11:34 PM
I can only hope you're going to some place like Madison that's at least in the southern part of the state. The further north you go, the worse it gets in the winter, and yes, even a couple hundred miles makes a HUGE difference. Madison, for example, is relatively mild; sure, they still get snow and their fair share of cold temperatures. But where I'm from (about 3-4 hours north of Madison) it easily gets to be -65 degrees with windchill and a constant sheet of ice on the road 'cuz the sun is only ever out long enough to start to melt it, and then it all re-freezes. This happened to use for a good two weeks last winter. I'm not sure how cold Madison got at that time, but they're on average a bit warmer.


Once again, I am going to jump off the main topic.

Winter of 2007-2008, I was in the Milwaukee area. Worked halfway between Milwaukee and Madison. Tons of snow. More than tons. Can we say record breaking snowfall? Green Bay got realatively little.

Almost the same thing this past winter. In one day, parts of Milwaukee County got 12-18 inches of snow. For the most part, GB got, again, relatively little.



Back on topic.

Congrats, have fun, and try not to get caught. :wave:

thegiraffe
08-22-2009, 04:12 AM
Oh! I forgot ONE more thing that's super important.

DON'T. LET. ANYONE. USE. YOUR. COMPUTER!!!!

My roommate my first year totally messed my computer up because she downloaded all kinds of crap on it...to the point where I password protected it and refused to unlock it for her. Granted, she didn't have one of her own, but she essentially fried it because of all the viruses and etc she downloaded. I had to get a new computer because of her.

Trust me...it'll make your life much easier if you just tell them 'no'. Especially with a laptop - you don't want it dropped or whatever.

lupo pazzesco
08-22-2009, 05:10 AM
Oh! I forgot ONE more thing that's super important.

DON'T. LET. ANYONE. USE. YOUR. COMPUTER!!!!

My roommate my first year totally messed my computer up because she downloaded all kinds of crap on it...to the point where I password protected it and refused to unlock it for her. Granted, she didn't have one of her own, but she essentially fried it because of all the viruses and etc she downloaded. I had to get a new computer because of her.

Trust me...it'll make your life much easier if you just tell them 'no'. Especially with a laptop - you don't want it dropped or whatever.

Ditto ditto ditto ditto ditto ditto ditto ditto ditto DITTO!!!!!!

<gasppantwheeeeze>

Same experience right down the line with my roommate second year. I couldn't even password protect it, because whatever she DLed or did, the IT guys said they had to wipe, then reinstall everything. Something about a worm or trojan or the like (not technically proficient here, I just know she farked it up hardcore and I lost everything I had on there.)

JuniorMintz
08-22-2009, 05:36 AM
Do you wear glasses, contacts, or both?

Now is the time to stock up on contact lenses and solution (you can get some big ass bottles from Target, Costco, or just about any drug store). If possible (or necessary), have an eye exam and contact lens refit. Have your glasses adjusted and repaired, if they require it. If you have only one set of glasses and you are so amazingly blind that you cannot function without some sort of correction, look into purchasing a second pair as a backup.

And above all else, take a written copy of your prescriptions for both glasses and contacts, in case you have any sort of optical emergency while you are away.

Just a friendly reminder from your resident C.S. Optician (who is completely and totally exhausted because of all the calls and visits from patients of all ages who are going back to school this month, and further frazzled while making such preparations for herself as well!)

Congratulations, and have fun at school! :)

McGoddess09
08-22-2009, 06:45 PM
JM, I'm getting that all done on Tuesday. :D

rvdammit
08-22-2009, 10:16 PM
A cash stash. Whatever you take you'll get there and go "Darn I need a...", so you don't have fartarse aboust getting money.

prb
08-22-2009, 11:06 PM
Bring Condoms

McGoddess09
08-23-2009, 05:27 PM
I won't be needing those, prb.

Jester
08-23-2009, 05:33 PM
McG, you think now you won't, but trust me, it is always better to have them and not need them than to need them and not have them. :D

McGoddess09
08-23-2009, 05:40 PM
There is a reason why I won't need them,Uncle Jester. :D

prb
08-23-2009, 05:47 PM
I won't be needing those, prb.You say that now.... ;) i'm just joking

Becks
08-23-2009, 05:48 PM
Even if YOU don't need them, others will.

Sell them and make a nice profit.

McGoddess09
08-23-2009, 06:30 PM
Good point Becks! Now that you point that out...hehe.

Actually, one of my friend's mom sells sex toys. Maybe she could let me in on it. That way, I can make money and be in the work study program! If that's how it works.

Greenday
08-23-2009, 06:44 PM
Even if YOU don't need them, others will.

You never know when you'll be chilling in your room late at night and someone will knock on your open door, asking you if you have a condom and could sign it with a marker because they are playing truth or dare.

I know it's mad early, but here's my tip for every other year of college: don't unpack anything you don't have to. I go back to college next Saturday and I didn't unpack the majority of my stuff from last year. Packing will take VERY little time.

McGoddess09
08-26-2009, 11:52 PM
Most of my packing is done! I just have to do laundry and pack up those clothes!