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Eireann
12-01-2006, 01:52 PM
This isn't exactly SC behavior, but completely stupid.

For those of you who don't know, I live in Prague. No, I'm not Czech - just part of a rather large expatriate community here.

So. I like to go to tearooms; they're one of the few non-smoking public establishments here. Plus, they have a wide variety of tea and a relaxing atmosphere.

One day, when meeting with my conversation student, I overheard three American women talking at the next table. Now, this is a tearoom. The sign says "tearoom" in Czech AND English. When you sit down (self-seating), the server hands you a whole damn TEA menu. The only non-tea drinks they have are mineral water and soft drinks.

So these three women sat there chatting, and when the server approached, the spokeswoman came out with it:

"Do you have any decaf coffee?"

God, I hope they haven't bred.

chainedbarista
12-01-2006, 02:44 PM
they have; you can bet on it, and probably have at least three bratlings a piece.

Eireann
12-01-2006, 03:08 PM
They were not of the age to have bratlings - maybe teenage hellions, though. I think if they had bratlings, they would have had them in the tearoom, rampaging everywhere and creating a huge disturbance.

While I was there, though, I talked to my student about the movie Titanic, how I hated it, what a rotten film it was, and a complete waste of my time and money.

The three women sat deadly silent at their table, giving me the evil eye.

:lol:

mrtauntaun
12-01-2006, 03:36 PM
You are not allowed to badmouth Titanic in America. I think it's a law.
In fact, when I get home, I am sure the wife will yell at me just for reading that you hated it ;)

protege
12-01-2006, 04:53 PM
You are not allowed to badmouth Titanic in America.

I thought the special effects in that flick were amazing. However, waiting for the damn ship to sink just bored me. Sink the damn ship already :p

Banrion
12-01-2006, 04:58 PM
I was working at the theatre when Titanic came out. I could not believe that I would see people 15-20 times to see that movie over the course of the run. I am proud to say that I have NOT seen the movie in it's entirety. I have seen the first 10 and last 10 minutes about 500000000000 times though. My b/f had a good dating life while that movie was out apparantly, because he saw it 4 times. :lol:

Cia
12-01-2006, 05:42 PM
I know what happened to the Titanic - it sank. Why would I want to go see a movie about it?

jb17kx
12-01-2006, 06:58 PM
The exception to that is Tora! Tora! Tora! You know Pearl gets hit, but you still go becasue lifesize explosions and 1:1 scale models of ships are impressive, and Jerry Goldsmith is an orchestral master.

All the same, I regret to inform you that those... people... will have had at least 2 kids each by the time they're 25.

Eireann
12-01-2006, 09:21 PM
They were in their forties, judging by the look of them - though I didn't take a good look, except when the spokeswoman asked the infamous DECAF question. I'm assuming that they couldn't read, or that they couldn't read well enough to find the word "coffee" in the menu.

But man, that Titanic remark really worked! They didn't stay long, though they tried to burn me alive with their eyes. And the silence was most welcome.

Seanette
12-01-2006, 11:23 PM
I must be one of about 5 women in the US who disliked that movie, for several reasons.
1. The :censored: hype and gushing! There are movies I *refuse* to see because they practically became a religion with very overzealous people telling me "You MUST see this!". Uh, no. If it interests me, I'll see it. If it doesn't, and your new object of worship frankly doesn't, I'll skip it. Back off me a bit and I might well watch it a few years down the road when the hype's died down enough that the bad taste has gone away.
2. Weren't the *real* people on that ship of any interest, or at all worthy of being remembered?
3. I hate the ending (yes, I've seen portions of the [beep] movie, "thanks" to DH). She has this brief adolescent shipboard fling, so after she's lived her adult life with another man, had kids by him, etc., it's the shipboard fling she insists on reuniting with, not her *husband*??? Ugh.

ArenaBoy
12-02-2006, 12:51 AM
I have no intention of seeing it and I hate it for some absurd reasons. I was in 4th grade when it came out and for some strange reason I bore a resembalance to Di Caprio. I had strangers, neighbors, clerks, relatives, and anyone going up to me saying that I looked like Di Caprio. I don't look like him now thank gord but it drove me insane hearing "AWWW, he looks Leonardo Di Caprio!" GAAHHH!!!!!!! :rant: :pissed: :banghead: :hairpull:

Rahmota
12-02-2006, 02:14 AM
I must be one of the few here who actually liked the movie then. Maybe not as intimately as some people but it was still a good movie. But then again I am one of those people who is rather fascinated by the whole time period and how Titanic fit into the big picture of things.

But as for the Decaf Coffee thing. To play the devil here: Tea or coffee its all hot water and boiled leaves so its the same thing isn't it?:rolleyes:

*duck and cover*

rvdammit
12-02-2006, 03:12 AM
I thought the special effects in that flick were amazing. However, waiting for the damn ship to sink just bored me. Sink the damn ship already :p

I haven't seen it, you spoiled the ending! :p

Pagan
12-02-2006, 04:09 AM
I know what happened to the Titanic - it sank. Why would I want to go see a movie about it?

For the same reason that we watch "Apollo 13". We know how it ends, it's the getting there that's exciting. Just like how at the beginning of "Raiders of the Lost Ark", you know Indy is going to get out of the situation, but you still sit there, riveted to your seat!

I must be one of about 5 women in the US who disliked that movie, for several reasons.

Seanette, :wave: meet one of the other 5 women! I actually had no real interest in the thing, but I also wasn't going to help it beat "Star Wars - A New Hope"!

But as for the Decaf Coffee thing. To play the devil here: Tea or coffee its all hot water and boiled leaves so its the same thing isn't it?:rolleyes:

Um, no. Tea is indeed made from leaves. Coffee, on the other hand, is made from beans. :p

Seanette
12-02-2006, 04:39 AM
Seanette, :wave: meet one of the other 5 women! I actually had no real interest in the thing, but I also wasn't going to help it beat "Star Wars - A New Hope"!
I wasn't that enthused about that one, either. :D

Gotta confess: I saw "Silence of the Lambs" at least six times when it was in theatrical release. Part of the weekly routine for a semester or so: get out of Wednesday evening class (with that and the next evening off from my job), head over to the movie theater (only one in the large town/small city I went to school in), and since that was in that time period the most interesting movie they were showing..... :D

XCashier
12-02-2006, 06:33 PM
I must be one of about 5 women in the US who disliked that movie, for several reasons.
1. The :censored: hype and gushing! There are movies I *refuse* to see because they practically became a religion with very overzealous people telling me "You MUST see this!". Uh, no.
I guess I'm another of the 5. :wave: For the very same reason you listed.

At that time, I saw a few people wearing T-shirts that read, "The ship sank. Get over it." :lol: I wish I'd gotten one!

Myra
12-02-2006, 08:10 PM
I'm an American and have NO problem dissing that movie. I was dragged into seeing it with a friend who adored Leo DiCaprio. I thought it was all right, not worth another viewing. But to hear others go on about it, I was thinking "Okay, the acting was medicocre at best, but the effects were good...it was really kinda predictable. What's the big deal?"

However, the Husband has heard a rumor they are actually making a sequel. Please tell me what on earth have they to talk about? Leo's character drowned, the old lady chucked the necklace in the sea, the boat sank. What would they make a movie about? The chick's life with the rich dude? YAWN!

mrsmarit
12-02-2006, 08:17 PM
Oh man I am one of those 5 women who didn't like Titanic either.


And I worked at a movie theater when it came out. In fact the most fun I ever had at that job was announcing the sold out shows of Titanic.


A typical Friday and Staurday night went like this.


Good evening ladies and gentlemen the following shows of Titanic are sold out for the evening.. and then proceed to list every single show except maybe the last one of the evening which was past most of the people in lines curfew...

Then see them scramble for whatever shows still had seats.. which after I announced the sold out shows I would make sure to tell them the ones that still had seats available.

Then I would end with.. and if you wish to see this movie on a Friday or Saturday may I suggest that you buy your tickets ahead of time and get here 60-90 minutes ahead of the scheduled time to make sure you get decent seats.

This went on for 2 months.. 2 months of gleefully announcing sold out shows.. man I miss that sometimes :D

AFpheonix
12-02-2006, 10:56 PM
I guess then that I'm the 5th woman :p

I saw it when it was on video, someone lent it to us. Meh. The effects weren't even that exciting by the time I saw it on the small screen. I guess I'm one of the few straight women that thinks DiCaprio is kind of ugly, too. However, I did think that Kate Winslet has nice tits. That's really all I took home from that movie.

Gurndigarn
12-03-2006, 01:06 AM
One day, when meeting with my conversation student, I overheard three American women talking at the next table. Now, this is a tearoom. The sign says "tearoom" in Czech AND English. When you sit down (self-seating), the server hands you a whole damn TEA menu. The only non-tea drinks they have are mineral water and soft drinks.

So these three women sat there chatting, and when the server approached, the spokeswoman came out with it:

"Do you have any decaf coffee?"

God, I hope they haven't bred.

Well, to be fair, it's probably just a cultural thing. In the US, you can get coffee at just about every place imaginable... so it's quite likely that they didn't even think that other places might be different. It would be like a european coming to my state (now smoke free in most public areas) and lighting up in a resturaunt.

Gurndigarn
12-03-2006, 01:29 AM
However, the Husband has heard a rumor they are actually making a sequel. Please tell me what on earth have they to talk about? Leo's character drowned, the old lady chucked the necklace in the sea, the boat sank. What would they make a movie about? The chick's life with the rich dude? YAWN!

Oh, is that how it ended? Forbidden passion and star-crossed love. Oh, and noble sacrifices on top of it all?

For that final touch, it should have had a thousand elephants.

rvdammit
12-03-2006, 08:01 AM
However, the Husband has heard a rumor they are actually making a sequel. Please tell me what on earth have they to talk about? Leo's character drowned, the old lady chucked the necklace in the sea, the boat sank. What would they make a movie about? The chick's life with the rich dude? YAWN!

Raise the Titanic? Didn't they do that one already?

Eireann
12-03-2006, 05:47 PM
The thing is, this tearoom is NOT easy to find, even for those who know where it is. It's off the beaten path. So these women either worked very hard to find it, or they saw the sign. The sign does not say anything about coffee. The sign has a teapot painted on it. As if that weren't enough, there is zero coffee aroma inside (though not infrequently, in warm weather, the area outside is redolent with pot).

And if that's insufficient, all they had to do was open the menu and SEE what was offered. That's what gets me, every time. They didn't open the menu. They also pulled the old "all-foreigners-speak-my-language" when addressing the server.

Gah.

repsac
12-03-2006, 09:40 PM
Personally, I loved it. But only because I got a kick out of looking for the little easter eggs like the rubber ducky.

skeptic53
12-04-2006, 02:55 AM
My father-in-law was born in Slovakia in 1919. He came to the US at age 10. We took him back in 1993, when Prague had been a hot ex-pat hangout for only a couple of years. He was 74, very cranky & self-centered. It was like traveling with a 3-year-old who had seniority over us.

The dumb-American-wanting-decaf thing is nothing. We were traveling in Czech & Slovak Republics for a month, and he wanted a martini every night. The first few nights he got Martini brand sweet vermouth on the rocks, much to his disgust. From then on we tried teaching the bartenders how to make a martini, but they never came out dry enough for him. However, he refused to tell us how much dry vermouth made a perfect martini. He'd just say "You know,...." and make a brief pouring motion. I finally got him to say it was 11 drops. I looked up "drop" in our Czech/English dictionary, had one made to his specification, nope. No good. I tried asking bartenders if they knew the drink that James Bond liked, but that was no help either.

Worse, from his point of view, was the fact that the menus were mostly in Czech and German. He had fought in the Battle of the Bulge (Bronze Star) and had absolutely no use for Germans or their language. I speak a little German and would sometimes use it to try to clarify our order or to ask questions (I don't speak Czech) and he'd get really mad. He spoke a dialect of Slovak that no one outside his hometown could understand.

Our last night we went to a nice restaurant in Prague and they brought a drinks trolley. I saw that they had gin and dry vermouth on it and I pounced. "OK Mike, show us how you make a perfect martini!" He poured the gin, then he poured the vermouth... glug, glug, glug. He pronounced it perfect. I about fell out of my chair laughing.

HYHYBT
12-08-2006, 04:43 AM
Tea is indeed made from leaves. Coffee, on the other hand, is made from beans.Green beans? Pinto beans? Lima beans? Butterbeans??

Raise the Titanic? Didn't they do that one already?Well, it was a board game at least, possibly a movie too...

cheese
12-08-2006, 11:13 AM
I'm afraid I adored Titanic.. I had a huge crush on Leo, and went to see it 5 times at the cinema I believe. I was only 12 though, so its understandable. Right? I've grown out of it now, obviously..

Had some American ladies in once, came up to me and said
Them: "Where the hell are your bikes??"
Me: "Excuse me??"
Them: "Are you an idiot, you know, bicycles? Where are they?"
Me: "Er, this is a supermarket, we don't sell bicycles.."
Them: "What? Walmart does! You mean we have to go somewhere else?" *walk off muttering*
Why would you to buy a bicycle when you're on holiday anyway?

Dreamstalker
12-08-2006, 05:25 PM
I must be one of about 5 women in the US who disliked that movie, for several reasons.
*raises paw* Make that 6. My name's Dreamstalker, and I am a Titanic-hater.

Yes, I was the "Titanic trivia master" in my afterschool group and I've watched almost every Discovery Channel special on it, but that does not mean I would automatically love the movie. I've always been more interested in the disaster from an engineering standpoint (i.e. what failed and how, what should the designers have taken into account, why didn't they, etc) and an archaeological view.

--Too. Long. Yes, LoTR was of a similar length, but that's a movie I can get into.
--I just hate sappy movies with a passion. Not sure why.
--like you said Seanette, what about everyone else on the ship? Were they not important?

I did like DiCaprio in The Departed, but that's the kind of movie I like anyway.

Well, to be fair, it's probably just a cultural thing. In the US, you can get coffee at just about every place imaginable... so it's quite likely that they didn't even think that other places might be different.
I'm an avid (some might say minorly obsessed) coffee drinker. On my first trip to Ireland, I was a bit puzzled at the non-availability of coffee "to go", but got over that in about three seconds. I actually came out of that trip with a liking for tea.

Cia
12-08-2006, 05:54 PM
In a tea shop I order tea, in a coffee shop I order coffee and in a shop that sells both it just depends on what looks good and what kind of munchies they sell.

BTW who do you spell 'tea' and 'coffee' in Czech?

Seanette
12-08-2006, 07:57 PM
--I just hate sappy movies with a passion. Not sure why.
--like you said Seanette, what about everyone else on the ship? Were they not important?
What's really irritating is that apparently the only people on that ship who mattered were FICTIONAL. No *real* people were worthy of being remembered, apparently.

I share your distaste for sappy movies. My DH likes them more than I do, AAMOF.

zzapp the witch
12-09-2006, 06:55 AM
Titanic sucks. I haven't seen it all (wouldn't be caught dead), but caught the ending right as Leo dies. Cheered for the TV and got glared at by everyone, until I asked when the stupid chick was gonna bite it, too, THEN I had things thrown at me.

So, apparently there's more than 5 that don't like it.......





Wanna know a secret?

I also cheer for Darth Vader. That started about 20 years ago when I was trying to piss off my brothers.

Eireann
12-09-2006, 09:11 PM
The Czech word for coffee is "kava". The word for tea is "caj" (pronounced "chai"). I once dealt with a new acquaintance who asked, very loudly (in that all-foreigners-are-deaf tone) for chai tea at an Indian restaurant. I told her that data masala tea is the equivalent. This woman claimed to have lived in many different countries, but she still talked to everyone as if they were deaf and not very intelligent.

I cut the acquaintance short when she called me up and asked if she could move in with me while she was waiting for a new place to open up.

Rapscallion
12-09-2006, 09:14 PM
This woman claimed to have lived in many different countries, but she still talked to everyone as if they were deaf and not very intelligent.

Was she English, by any chance?

Rapscallion

repsac
12-10-2006, 04:18 AM
d. I tried asking bartenders if they knew the drink that James Bond liked.


Where a traditional martini is Gin and Vermouth, a James bond martini is made with Vodka and vermouth. Plus, by having it shaken, it bruises the alcohol and makes the taste stronger.

Eireann
12-10-2006, 05:52 PM
Was she English, by any chance?

Rapscallion

No, American. Seems like I'm always running into loud American tourists. They try to latch on to me - "'Scuse me? 'Scuse me? 'Scuse me?"

I walk on by and pretend I don't speak English. Hey, if you don't speak the language of the country you're visiting, buy a phrasebook. Don't expect everyone to hold your hand once you're there.

SongsOfDragons
12-13-2006, 09:43 PM
Titanic = one of the most pointless movies EVER. You know exactly how the bloody thing's going to end.

Tearooms = blasphemy to sell coffee!! Nasty gunk. Tea is the lifebloooood...

Becks
12-14-2006, 04:20 PM
2. Weren't the *real* people on that ship of any interest, or at all worthy of being remembered?


To be fair, they do have a portrayal of Molly Brown, who I believe IS a real person.

:ot: I like your siggy. :D

Eireann
12-14-2006, 06:16 PM
She was. She was known as the "Unsinkable" Molly Brown, since she survived the Titanic disaster.

Becks
12-15-2006, 04:00 PM
That's what I thought, but I wasn't totally sure.

I read too much, and things get jumbled together sometimes.