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View Full Version : So who gets the time off?


DrFaroohk
12-28-2010, 11:38 PM
You have two employees who both want Tuesday off. All things being equal, that is, they're both the same type of employee, both been there the same amount of time, have the same attendance record, etc....but you can only give one of them the day off. How do you decide?

Salted Grump
12-29-2010, 12:21 AM
Flip a coin, or if I know both of them personally, give the day off to the person whose family has suffered the most deaths recently, with the understanding that the second person will get a preference towards the next day off they request.

Imprl59
12-29-2010, 12:24 AM
Easy one.

The one that gets the day off is the one most likely to come in when I need them or most likely to help out with that undesirable task witout giving me any grief

csquared
12-29-2010, 12:47 AM
I second Imprl59.

If they are both equal there also, make the two of them decide how it will be settled, with the understanding that the denied request get preference next time.

Bright_Star
12-29-2010, 02:10 AM
Who asked first? That's who you give it to.

Android Kaeli
12-29-2010, 02:15 AM
^Agreed. First come, first serve should be the normal route, regardless.

EvilEmpryss
12-29-2010, 02:59 AM
I had to deal with this in the military. We would drill down through rank, date they made rank, time on station, and time in service if necessary, but usually the following questions decided the issue:

Who asks for time off less?
Who has more leave time on the books?
What is the lead time on the request? Did they ask today for time off tomorrow, or did they give me a few weeks or months to decide?
What is the purpose of the time off? Medical appointments, sick/dieing family, etc. generally take precedence over "just 'cuz".
How did they ask? If one has an EW attitude about taking time off, it's going to count against 'em.

Try and get the two workers to talk it out themselves, and definitely give precedence on the next conflicting vacation time to the one who doesn't get first pick this time. It may seem more fair to just flip for it, or draw lots, but in my experience that usually comes across as a cop out. Unless both workers buy into the idea, one or both may wind up feeling that their needs weren't addressed.

Mytical
12-29-2010, 04:07 AM
Alphabetically with whoever didn't get it this time, automatically getting it next time.

Andara Bledin
12-29-2010, 04:48 AM
All other things being equal, the one who asked first.

^-.-^

Duelist925
12-29-2010, 08:51 AM
Bat'leth competition, or, failing that, riddle contest. Sphinx optional.

Aisling
12-29-2010, 09:02 AM
Bat'leth competition, or, failing that, riddle contest. Sphinx optional required.

Or they could arm-wrestle bears!

PepperElf
12-29-2010, 10:55 AM
actually i like the idea of...

1) why do you need time off? the one with the more valid reason gets to go first, and the other can get another day

2) first come first serve

3) or tell them that you can only spare one of them at a time and ask them if either one wants to - or can - reschedule. sometimes people will be adult and voluntarily take another day off.

DrFaroohk
12-29-2010, 04:06 PM
So if it comes down to who asked first, throw this in there:

Employee A left a note for the boss as he got off shift one night.

Employee B was in with the boss first thing in the morning, and asked before the boss read the note.

Who asked first? Employee B asked first, but Employee A wrote the note first.

Sableonblonde
12-29-2010, 04:38 PM
Employee A, since technically he did ask first.

JarethsPet
12-29-2010, 05:24 PM
Bat'leth competition, or, failing that, riddle contest. Sphinx optional.


You are awesome in the Almighty Book of Awesome.
...Stay on Topic Jarethspet!!
I agree mostly with everyone else.. I just wanted to tell Duelist this

MoonCat
12-29-2010, 05:49 PM
We do it according to who asked first. There's a form we have to use, which we email to the admin person. That proves whose request got in first.

Skeksin
12-30-2010, 02:21 AM
I'm surprised no one else has mentioned it.

Thunderdome

EvilEmpryss
12-30-2010, 12:15 PM
First $20 gets the vacation time. :devil:

Becks
12-31-2010, 05:33 AM
Who asked first? That's who you give it to.

That's what I was going to say.

Solumina
12-31-2010, 09:50 PM
If the requests were made on different days then it should go to the person who requested it first if they were made on the same date (time of day is more dependant on when they were scheduled and what they had to do at work then planning or such on the employee's part and I for one am sick of morning shifts getting scheduling preference because they come in earlier since we can only put requests in a certain amount in advance) then figure out why they want the request and give it to the person who has a more time sensitive reason (doctor's appointments can usually be rescheduled, your sister's graduation cannot) and talk to the other person about selecting a different day and do your best to make sure that they get something worked out.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
12-31-2010, 11:25 PM
So if it comes down to who asked first, throw this in there:

Employee A left a note for the boss as he got off shift one night.

Employee B was in with the boss first thing in the morning, and asked before the boss read the note.

Who asked first? Employee B asked first, but Employee A wrote the note first.

Employee B. Face-to-face beats a note which can be thrown away by accident or overlooked, IMO.

If I were the manager and I told B he could have the day off, I'm not going to call him back in and tell him he can't because of the note A left me. I believe if it's vitally important you get a day off, you should speak with the manager. It's just more personal.

Mytical
01-01-2011, 10:13 AM
Thunderdome

Two men enter, one man leaves! Of course they were sexist..who said it had two men????

Andara Bledin
01-02-2011, 10:56 PM
I believe if it's vitally important you get a day off, you should speak with the manager. It's just more personal.
So, because B was scheduled but A was not (or was at, say, school or a second job), then B gets preferential treatment?

^-.-^

Irving Patrick Freleigh
01-02-2011, 11:29 PM
The problem I have with notes is they can be easily misplaced. A manager's desk can be an unkempt place. I personally have had notes I left lost or overlooked until it was too late to act on them. I can leave a note on my manager's desk, and it gets covered up by memos or whatever paperwork happens to be left there. I feel it's better to speak with somebody in person if possible, even if it has to be done ridiculously in advance.

And it all depends on what comes first--A speaking to the manager or B's note being read. Like I said before, if A speaks to me and I approve his time off before I get to B's note, I'm not going to tell A he can't have his time off after all, even though B left his note first.

It's not preferential treatment; it's just that I got the message from A first. If I get B's note first, then B gets the time off. The timing of when I hear it from whom matters.

PepperElf
01-06-2011, 12:48 PM
I'd say A. Cos A really did ask first.

actually my first instinct was wondering if B knew that A had left a note and had tried to get to the boss before the note was read.

as for the "note vs in-person" debate, there cannot be a clear ruling on which should get preferential treatment because we don't know all of the circumstances of the time-off requests or how the shifts are. just as there are those who feel face-to-face means more effort, there are also valid reasons to support leaving a note as well


though, the suggestion of having people ask via email ... that one i like. cos that way you can tell who asked first and you have a "paper trail" for all the pertinent facts.

Andara Bledin
01-06-2011, 07:57 PM
Bosslady has to deal with this sort of situation every so often when the sales clerks want the same time off. We've only got 3. Sometimes she'll go to them to see if one of them is willing to allow the other to take it.

Otherwise, written requests (which always go to the same place, so the whole "but notes get lost" argument is completely invalid) on the standard form trump other methods.

^-.-^

boringscreenname
01-23-2011, 09:52 AM
I would say Employee A, since they did technically ask first. And I agree with PepperElf on the note vs. speaking to the manager in person debate.

Where I work we have to fill out a form requesting time off, and be done 30 days in advance (barring emergencies). We put the forms in our Supervisor's mailbox, he either approves or denies the request. If he approves the request it's faxed to our main office for the Office Manager for final approval.

Greenday
01-24-2011, 03:08 PM
The clear answer is neither. Force both to work mandatory overtime.

Suckas!