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fireheart
12-16-2011, 02:38 PM
Share something different or unusual about your hometown or state that would fall into a trivia book (i.e. in Rand McNally, hamburgers eat people :p)

I'll kick it off with a couple about my hometown:

-All around the city centre, there are a lot of buildings with the sign "POLITES" hanging over them. The reason behind it? A guy with the last name of Polites owns a lot of the buildings in the city centre. So he just labelled them with huge honking signs saying "I own this building!" :lol:

-We are the only state surrounded by all other states (this is Australia). Northern Territory does not count-it is a Territory, not a state.

-The film "December Boys", which involved Daniel Radcliffe and Teresa Palmer, was shot almost entirely on Kangaroo Island. That is one of our few claims to fame as far as "great" films go. (We've had a few films shot around the area, however they were kids films: Selkie and Sally Marshall is Not An Alien! were both filmed in my state, Selkie in fact was filmed not that far from home)

-We were the first colony (we became a state in 1901) to allow women to vote in Australia. We were also one of the first states to decriminalise homosexuality, due to a very prominent politician by the name of Don Dunstan. (he actually entered Parliament one day wearing pink shorts that ended above the knee)

-We created Farmers Union Iced Coffee and it is still the best Iced Coffee out there. :D (Although we didn't create the ad (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxgP3heHU5k) :p)

Gumby30
12-16-2011, 02:51 PM
My old hometown is known for being the burial place for most of the Kray family - East End gangsters.

My current hometown is the last resting place of a King of England, even if no-one is EXACTLY sure where he is buried.

RecoveringKinkoid
12-16-2011, 02:58 PM
Our state capitol building, which is very old and made of granite, has big chips in it and a busted stone windowsill on the side that faces the river.

This is because General Sherman sat across said river and used the building as a target to calibrate his cannons during the Civil War.


We have a scary creature called the "Third Eye Man" living underneath the University downtown.

One of our theaters (plays, not movies...One of the two I used to build sets for) predates the Civil War and has been a church, an armory, a hospital, a morgue, and gymnasium, and (get this) an olympic swimming pool. It's now a Shakespearean (in the round) theater, a scene shop, and a costume shop.

We have a fountain downtown that looks like a two story high busted fireplug, made by local artist Blue Sky. It's ugly. But it's fun.

There are two huge historic mansions downtown facing each other. One was built as a big "fuck you" to the builder of the other one.

Back in the eighties, we were a pretty important rock hub. In fact, Hootie and the Blowfish are from here.

The team mottos here are "Go Cocks", "Can't Beat Our Cocks", and my personal favorite, "Cant' Lick Our Cocks."

I couldn't make this stuff up, folks.

FormerCallingCardRep
12-16-2011, 03:06 PM
I will give you facts about both where I live and where I work

Where I live (Metro Area wide):

Where Aaron Burr meet to plan his new republic

The first public high school in the State

The first public schools in the state for the African Americans

Largest high school in the state

Runner up for the title of Titletown USA

Home of one of the best high school choirs in the world. Last spring at the world championships, our Women's Ensemble placed first in the world.

Where I work:

The first settlement in the Northwest Territory

chikenlady
12-16-2011, 04:10 PM
t's the home of the Edmonton Protocol, a pancreatic islet transplantation process hailed as a possible cure for diabetes.
While Edmonton may have the worlds largest shopping mall it was in the Guiness Book of World Records for the largest parking lot in the world (at said mall).
Edmonton is also home to North America’s largest urban green space known as River Valley. It’s 22 times the size of New York’s Central Park making Edmonton have the largest per capita area of parkland of any other Canadian city.
known as “the Festival City” Edmonton is host to over 30 different festivals throughout the year including the Edmonton International Fringe Festival taking place for over 30 years now, every August. The Fringe Festival is the biggest of its kind in North America and is the second biggest in the world next to the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland.
Was the home of Wilfrid "Wop" May, a famous bush pilot who fought the Red Baron in his last dogfight of WW1.
NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity located a rock on the south slope of the Endurance Crater on Mars. The 1 metre (3.3-foot) rock was given the name wopmay after the legendary Canadian bush pilot.[5]

*sorry, I found it easier to copy and paste these facts :)

taxguykarl
12-16-2011, 04:38 PM
Site of the invention of the flyswatter and radar gun.

First Illinois residence of Abraham Lincoln (he was born in Kentucky).

4 count them 4 Main Streets (North, South, East and West Main)...these meet at the site of an log cabin courthouse (since relocated) where Lincoln first practiced law.

A block north of the 4 Mains (as us natives refer to that intersection) lies a theater listed among the Travel Channel's Most Terrifying Places in America.

HQ for various soy bean processors, hence its nickname Soy City. A radio station call letters are literally WSOY (AM-news/talk; FM-top 40).

Original home of the Bears, before George Halas bought the team and moved it to Chicago.

Treasure
12-16-2011, 05:03 PM
STATE:
our Capitol building is made from native (pink) granite, and stands taller than the White House
Have been our own nation (and are damn proud of it)
the only state to join the union via treaty

CITY:
motto - Keep (city) Wierd!
at least 3 separate and distinct downtown "bar" districts - 6th street, Red River, and the "warehouse district"
we have a cross-dressing homeless man that runs for Mayor every so often.... he has his own Wikipedia entry....
we claim to be the "Live Music Capitol of the World"
also home to the largest "Mexican free tail Bat" colony - they live under the South Congress Bridge, and is a "maternity" colony - comprised of mature females and their babies...

Lady Legira
12-16-2011, 05:22 PM
My city has the largest Gothic cathedral in northern Europe. York Minster (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/York_Minster)

The Roman Emperor Constantius I died in 306 AD during his stay in York, and his son Constantine the Great was proclaimed Emperor by the troops based in the fortress.

In 1644 the city was held in siege by the Parliamentarians from 22 April - 16 July. Lord Fairfax was made Governor of York by Parliament. He earned the thanks of the city by refusing to allow religious zealots in the victorious Scots and Parliamentarian armies to vandalise the many churches. This is one reason why we have a great deal of stained glass left when other churches in the country do not from the same period.

I could go on and on... :lol:

FormerCallingCardRep
12-16-2011, 05:35 PM
As far as State:

Our state capital dome is plated in gold

The first land battle of the Civil War was fought in Phillippi, WV over a covered bridge

We seceded from Virginia and became a state during the Civil War

Famous people from the state include Pearl S Buck, Don Knotts and Mary Lou Retton

Mother's Day originated in my state

Kheldarson
12-16-2011, 06:43 PM
We're also the only state where the Armed Forces have been used against the citizens.

Pepperoni rolls were invented here.

Food Lady
12-16-2011, 06:55 PM
My hometown has the first orange tree ever grafted to produce navel oranges. It's been around at least 100 years. It's at the diagonal cross of 2 major streets and surrounded by a little wrought-iron fence.

FormerCallingCardRep
12-16-2011, 07:10 PM
We're also the only state where the Armed Forces have been used against the citizens.

I forgot about that one.

We were also the butt of the hillbilly jokes due to the Hatfield and McCoy fued.

What part of the state are you in? I am in the Mid Ohio Valley.

The Lilly Family reunion held in Flat Top is listed in the Guiness Book of World Records for being the larges family reunion in the world and lasts 3 days

NateTheChops
12-16-2011, 07:18 PM
I'm from the town where Robert Frost is buried.

Shirley Jackson wrote The Lottery at Bennington College.

Southern Vermont College once belonged to Rupert Everett, who was the owner of the largest glass factory in the country during the 1800's.

Dom Deluise ate pizza at a place called Anne Marie's. You can see his autograph if you're ever in town.

Although the Battle of Bennington did not take place in the town, the Bennington Battle Monument was built to honor the fallen veterans of that battle. It is interesting to note that Ethan Allen's wife is reported to have said, "Tonight I go to bed a widow," the night before the battle.

firecat88
12-16-2011, 07:54 PM
In the next town over from us, there is a festival honoring a chicken who lived for four years without its head (the farmer who owned said chicken was going to make it into dinner, but the darned thing was still alive after having its head cut off).

About 6 hours' drive from here, in Estes Park, is the Stanley Hotel, which is where Stephen King got the inspiration to write The Shining.

My hometown is home to the Grand Mesa, which is the world's largest flat-top mountain.

Colorado has more microbreweries per capita than any other state.

Colorado has the highest mean altitude of all the states.

The highest suspension bridge in the world is over the Royal Gorge near Canon City. The Royal Gorge Bridge spans the Arkansas River at a height of 1,053 feet. (I have been there. It's beautiful, but freaky if you're like me and don't do well with heights.)

Antisocial_Worker
12-16-2011, 08:29 PM
A selection of fun facts about my city:

1. My city is mentioned in The Great Gatsby as a playground for the rich.

2. It is also mentioned on an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation, wherein one character distracts a guard by asking if that guard attended high school with her in my city.

3. In an episode of The X-Files, Mulder and Scully visit my city to conduct an autopsy on two victims found in a nearby county. This is problematic because there isn't enough left of the victims to perform an autopsy. It was also problematic because the show's producers incorrectly identified the county in which my city is located when naming the county morgue where this autopsy took place, and they didn't do their research -- there is no county morgue here. There is a pathology morgue at the hospital, but thanks to my state's centralized death-investigation system, autopsies are carried out in only four cities in the state. None of them are mine.

4. The Philippine government operated out of a hotel in my city for a time during WWII. Also during WWII, the US Federal Government commandeered all of my city's fancy resort hotels as well as a downtown shopping arcade. The hotels were used as prisons for captured Axis diplomats and POW's, and the arcade was used as the federal building. A few federal agencies also moved to my city because of its safe, isolated location and one, the National Climatic Data Center, still remains.

5. My city is home to the biggest private home in the US. This house boasts 250,000 square feet of floor space -- about four acres' worth. And in keeping with that WWII theme, this house also did its part for the war effort when the treasures of the National Gallery were transported here for storage, out of fears that Washington, DC might be bombed.

6. Of the two rivers that flow through my city, the larger is thought to be the third oldest river on the face of the earth. My city is the largest to be located on that river.

7. Robert Morgan, pilot of the Memphis Belle was born and raised here. During a bond drive tour of the country during WWII, Morgan banked the Belle at a 90-degree angle and flew it between city hall and the county courthouse -- which are less than 100 feet apart from each other.

8. Swannanoa, New Zealand is named after a community located just outside my city. it was named by a native from here who moved there and established a farm. Later, that man moved back here and built himself a castle called Zealandia, which still stands and which is known to be perhaps the most haunted location in town.

AnaKhouri
12-16-2011, 08:42 PM
I live a couple miles from the Gate to Hell.

I've even been there a few times but saw nothing stranger than some people riding a mechanical bull.

http://www.bobbymackey.com/hellsgate.html

The world's first hand transplant and the first Abiocor artificial heart operation were performed at a hospital in my hometown.

Kheldarson
12-16-2011, 09:02 PM
What part of the state are you in? I am in the Mid Ohio Valley.



We're in the Kanawha Valley. Actually live right off Corridor G.

Oh, and we can't forget we're the state that coined the term "rednecks".

Dave1982
12-16-2011, 09:03 PM
Portions of the movie "The Knowing" take place in my town, though none of the "locations" aside from Haystack Observatory were accurate. At one point they said something about caves off of Rt 40.....there are no caves anywhere along that road. Nicolas Cage was here briefly for location shooting at the Observatory.

Supposedly Edgar Allen Poe briefly lived here in 1848, but I believe that to be an urban legend.

LPGA and Golf Hall of Famer Pat Bradley was born here.

houdini
12-16-2011, 09:55 PM
My birthplace is Salisbury, which has the tallet spire in the UK, and is pretty much the only Cathedral that is built in one style of architecture - it was completed in 38 years, so is all Early English. It is also absolutely beautiful, but that's only my opinion :)

Ralph Fiennes went to Bishops Wordsworth School, and William Golding (Lord of the Flies) worked there as a teacher.

One of the pubs has a mummified severed hand, and there's a mummified cat in the museum (don't ask). Salisbury also has the highest ratio of pubs per square mile to the number of people, or something along those lines.

Chanlin
12-16-2011, 10:02 PM
My hometown is home to the first ever building to be covered completely in glass.

Toledo is home to the largest telescope and observatory in Ohio.

The Toledo Zoo designed and implemented the first ever hippoquarium (underwater hippo exhibit)

The Collingwood Arts Center in Toledo is fairly famous for being haunted.

FormerCallingCardRep
12-16-2011, 10:04 PM
We're in the Kanawha Valley. Actually live right off Corridor G..

We lived in Pocatallico for 4 years when I worked for AT&T. Little Bits was born at Women and Childrens

Irving Patrick Freleigh
12-17-2011, 12:15 AM
In my fair city, a piece of the Soviet spacecraft Sputnik fell on one of the main streets.

This has since become the cause of a major-ish celebration here involving baking and alien-costume contests.

I wish I was making this up.

unholypet
12-17-2011, 12:37 AM
My state is known as one of the least intelligent states in the U.S.A. since 1985. The home schooled population are always finalists in the national spelling bees, mathematics activities, and general knowledge tests.

My home town was part of Kentucky, but to make the state line smooth, the government split it in two.

My home area is one of the highest ranking healthy farming soil areas in the state.

There are more cows, dogs, cats, deer, sheep, goats, cats, and raccoons than there are humans every year, 2 to 1 minimum.

My work is one of the highest ranking in it's district, and when I worked at night, my backroom was acknowledged as BR of the month twice in a row during my 6 month stint as the BR employee.

BookstoreEscapee
12-17-2011, 12:45 AM
The Bruce Springsteen song "My Hometown" is about my hometown. :) One of his greatest hits albums has a picture of Main Street in the liner notes (sad how much it's changed).

Victory Sabre
12-17-2011, 12:58 AM
St. Cloud, MN

St. Cloud State University - Richard Dean Anderson went to SCSU. Also, legendary hockey coach - Herb Brooks - brought the Huskies into D1 college hockey.

City - Known as the Granite City. Numerous granite mines are in the area, including a former one that is now a park - Quarry Park.

The Mississippi River runs through it.

It is located in 3 counties - Benton, Shurburne, and Stearns.

It used to be 3 separate towns - Upper Town, Middle Town, and Lower Town.

Tom Petters, infamous for his ponzi schemes, is from here.

Jim Eisenreich - famous Baseball player was born here.

It's extremely difficult to get over the air TV here (unless you have a big frickin' antenna) because we're at the extreme outer edges of the twin cities, and Alexandria media markets.

State - Minnesota.

Second oldest family owned brewery is located in New Ulm - the Schell Brewery (lots of nummy beer is produced there).

Angle Inlet - If you want to get there by land, you have to cross through Canada. It is due to an error as to where the Mississippi headwaters were.

The Mississippi River starts here. You wouldn't believe how small it is in northern Minnesota.

St. Paul - the State Capitol - used to be called Pigs Eye.

The State has the longest history for not voting for a Republican for President, since 1972.

MoonCat
12-17-2011, 01:17 AM
-My city was the first US city to use electric street lights.
-It was the western end of the Erie Canal and brought thousands of people to the area.
-The city was burned to the ground by the British in the War of 1812. Supposedly, the first building to be rebuilt was the town pub (saloon). This explains a lot, actually. :lol:
-The city was an important destination of the Underground Railroad, the secret route along which many southern slaves fled to Canada. There are still buildings here that were used as hiding places.
-In the late 1800's Mark Twain lived and worked in the city.
-Pres. Wm. McKinley was shot and mortally wounded here during the Pan American Exposition in 1901. Teddy Roosevelt was sworn in as his successor at the Wilcox Mansion 8 days later.
-We have numerous Historical Landmarks here, including five buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, and buildings by other famous architects.
-We have the largest garden show in the nation during the last weekend of July every year. It's a self-guided tour, free of charge, and at last count includes over 350 gardens.
-The Goo Goo Dolls are from here (Robbie Takac founded Music is Art, a cultural organization that sponsors a Battle of the Bands and an instrument drive to obtain musical instruments for kids who can't afford them, among other functions)
-And of course we invented BUFFALO WINGS!!!! :D

Maria
12-17-2011, 04:15 AM
My state is, last time I checked, the only state in the union with two interstates that do not leave its borders.

People who think our desert area is hot and dry year-round, get very confused that my childhood scrapbooks contain photos of snowball fights in our front yard, and racing little boats fashioned out of aluminum foil, in the flooded streets in our neighborhood.

Although I have been informed that my future hometown is the lightning capital of the world or something, so I guess I won't be racing foil boats in the streets during rainstorms.

EricKei
12-17-2011, 04:34 AM
My hometown...

Is the birthplace of both the po-boy and the muffalletta

Is *almost* 100% under sea level

Refers to 50/50 Cafe au Lait with beginets as "coffee and doughnuts"

Has a local "city" accent that has more than once been described as "Brooklynese on qualuudes"

Has an average relative humidity of 85% or higher, year in and year out

Has a plethora of corrupt politicians, but we don't really care

Still has a reasonable amount of "good ol' down South charm" (in a good way) - People in the neighborhood wave and say Hi; doors are held; the tea is ice cold and the gumbo is bubbling hot

Is populated by people who think that a ten-minute drive constitutes "clear across town"

Is plenty weird, we're just to lazy too vote on a slogan saying so ;)

powerboy
12-17-2011, 05:07 AM
My City (Stockton, Cali). Was once had the official name of Crap Town.

KabeRinnaul
12-17-2011, 06:17 AM
Oh, and we can't forget we're the state that coined the term "rednecks".

We actually didn't, but is was popularized by the striking miners who wore red bandannas during the West Virginia coal wars (particularly the Battle of Blair Mountain), which was when the aforementioned use of the armed forces against civilians took place. Not that the US Army or Air Force ever fired upon the miners - those were primarily local law enforcement, strikebreakers, and Baldwin-Felts private detectives in the employ of the mine owners. However, President Harding did threaten the miners with the US Army, and several Air Force bombers were used for surveillance - though private planes did drop homemade bombs on the strikers.

Anyway, on to other topics...

Charleston was home to the nation's first natural gas well, and at one point we were the world's largest salt producer. There's still a large chemical manufacturing industry there due to the salt brine's chemical uses in World War I.

It also had the largest urban mall east of the Mississippi for a while in the 80s.

bhskittykatt
12-17-2011, 06:20 AM
My town is the furthest north in the contiguous 48 states with a population over 50,000.

My county has the furthest north incorporated area in the contiguous 48 states (due to a surveying error, the local border is ever so slightly north of the 49th parallel).

According to City-data.com (http://www.city-data.com/top2/c475.html), we have the lowest average sunshine amount in the US for a city over 50,000. Which is really kinda depressing.

I think we're ranked fourth in the US for coffee shops per capita.

Nearby Mount Baker holds the world record for most snowfall in one year, set in the '98-'99 season with 95 feet of snow. There are no snow machines up there at the ski resort. They rely on 100% natural powder.

Hillary Swank grew up in a trailer park just south of here. Of course, she doesn't remember us...

Ryan Stiles does, though. He lives just south of here. He founded the Upfront Theatre, an improv comedy club downtown. They do a couple shows a week, and Ryan will randomly participate in the shows if he's in town and feels like it, so you may get lucky and see him perform there on a random night. Just don't bug him outside of the club, though. He likes to be left alone, and the locals leave him alone, and we all get along like that. (He's really rather quiet and reserved in person.)

Becks
12-17-2011, 02:56 PM
Supposedly, the first building to be rebuilt was the town pub (saloon). This explains a lot, actually. :lol:


How did I hear it put once? You'll have more willing workers if there's someplace to celebrate the end of the word day.

Or something like that.

sarasquirrel
12-17-2011, 09:09 PM
my town:
is the oldest in the state. (suck it windsor)
is the setting for The Witch of Blackbird Pond
has "the oldest chartered volunteer fire department in continuous existence in the United States."

my state:
"Connecticut is home to the oldest U.S. newspaper still being published: The Hartford Courant, established in 1764. "
"Connecticut is home to the first hamburger (1895), Polaroid camera (1934), helicopter (1939), and color television (1948). "
"PEZ® Candy is made in the city of Orange. "

MoonCat
12-18-2011, 02:43 AM
my town:
is the oldest in the state. (suck it windsor)
is the setting for The Witch of Blackbird Pond


Love that book! :D

Jester
12-18-2011, 04:14 AM
Oh, where to begin? I mean, I live in one state, but am from another, both with rather impressive history.

I guess I'll start with my home state of Arizona, and go from there.

It is the 48th State, and in just a few weeks, will be celebrating the 100th anniversary of its entry into the Union, on February 14, 1912. People often think I'm joking with them when I ignore the other holiday on that date and simply refer to it as "Arizona Day," but if you look it up (as some have done), you will notice that it is, in fact, Arizona Day, for that very reason.

For those keeping score, you'll realize that Arizona was the last of the contiguous States to be brought into the Union. It was SUPPOSED to enter the Union at the same time as New Mexico (the 47th State), but many of the other State Legislatures objected to some of the things included in the proposed Arizona State Constitution--specifically, referendum, initiative, and recall. So there was a delay. Arizonans stuck to their guns (so to speak), and eventually were given Statehood, with all three political processes still included in the Constitution.

It seems to almost always have the hottest point in the country on any given day, but especially during the warm season (which is basically February to November).

Site of one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World, the Grand Canyon. What's so grand about a great big hole in the ground? I used to wonder the same thing...until I finally got there. Pictures and words simply can NOT do it justice.

The only State of the 50 that has all 7 of he world's climates within its borders...at least according to my high school State History teacher. I have no idea if this is true....

Frank Lloyd Wright's winter home. His retreat, Taliesin West, located just outside of Scottsdale, is simply astounding. And I'm not into architecture! Speaking of architecture though, I would be remiss as a proud Sun Devil if I did not mention that two of the buildings at Arizona State University were designed by him. (I also happen to share a birthday with him, though that has nothing to do with the State. Last I checked, he was the most famous person with our birthday, June 8.)

One of the four States that border Mexico, and I believe the one with the longest border with Mexico.

Some famous people to come from Arizona include Steven Spielberg, Stevie Nicks, Kerri Strug (the gymnast made famous by the whole ankle thing), and David Spade, though if you ever hear Spade comment on it, it's clear he hates the place. Considering he's from Casa Grande, it's kind of understandable.

Some famous people who have made Arizona their home include Erma Bombeck, the columnist and Rob Halford, the lead singer of Judas Priest. I am sure there are other famous people from or in Arizona, but this is all off the top of my head.

Old Tucson Studios were responsible for the vast majority of Westerns back in the day. As I like to remind all those proud Texans, just about every Western that takes place in Texas was actually filmed in Arizona. :lol: Also, large portions of "Bill and Ted's Great Adventure" were filmed in Arizona, along with "Campus Man" and "The Getaway" (the 1994 remake with Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger).

Another great tidbit I learned in high school is that Arizona is the "other" citrus state, producing more citrus than any other State not named Florida or California.

I have, in fact, stood on a corner in Winslow, Arizona, just like in the Eagles song. If you ever get to Winslow you will understand that that is pretty much the most exciting thing you can do there.

Home of the oldest trophy for a college football rivalry game in the U.S., the Territorial Cup, which goes to the winner of the annual Arizona State-University of Arizona game. The cup was made for the very first game between these two, back in 1899. Sadly, this year, the Territorial Cup has been claimed by that....other school. Grrrr....

While there is much to say about Florida, where I live now, most of what I know that is interesting about where I live is about Key West. Don't really know that much interesting trivia about the State as a whole.

So, Key West. Interesting place. Also called Key Weird, The Conch Republic, the Southernmost City, Bone Island, and Cayo Hueso. It's original name was Cayo Hueso, which literally means "Island of Bones." It was called that by the pirates that first got here because, while there were no living residents, there were tons of skeletons. While there are many theories as to who those skeletons were, no one really knows for sure. In any case, as they often do, English speakers came along along and butchered the name, making "Cayo Hueso" (pronounced KI-o WAY-so) into "Key West." Which is, of course, how the rest of the Keys in Florida got their names.

Also, as I mentioned, it is the Southernmost City, being the southernmost point of the contiguous U.S. (Hawaii is further south.) Which means, when people ask if you're from up north, the answer is usually "duh." Since everything is north of here.

At various points in its history, Key West has been the cigar-producing capital of the U.S., the sponge-producing capital of the U.S., and the richest city per capita in the U.S. (If you watch the movie "Tombstone," at the point where the Earps meet Holliday in the streets for the first time in Tombstone, behind the Earps you can see a storefront sign that reads "Key West Cigars," which would have been perfectly accurate for that time period.)

Key West is the place where Key Lime Pie was invented. If you get Key Lime Pie and it's green, it ain't the real deal. Key Lime pie should be almost white, with a yellowish greenish tinge to it. Never great. And it is not called Key Lime Pie merely because of where it was invented. It is made using Key Limes, which are different than the regular limes most people are used to. They are far smaller, being about the size of ping pong balls, and somewhat tarter.

David Robinson, the basketball legend, was born in Key West. Famous residents have included Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, Harry S Truman, and Jimmy Buffett.

The Green Parrot Bar, one of the oldest bars in Florida, was declared by Playboy Magazine to be one of the 20 coolest bars in the entire country. It also happens to be where we had our Christmas party this year. :cheers:

Highest speed limit in Key West: 35 mph. Considering it's a tiny 2 by four mile island, with the nearest freeway over 100 miles away, this is not all that surprising.

Monroe County, where the Florida Keys are, is the longest and narrowest county in the U.S. Check a map to understand why.

Closest major city to Key West: Havana, Cuba, only 90 miles away, whereas Miami, the closest major American city, is 150 miles away.

Bars can be open till 4 am, and can open as early as 7 am. It also has the most liquor licenses per capita of anywhere in the U.S. In other words, a great place to be a drunk. :cheers:

The Florida Keys, as the Conch Republic, in a dispute with the federal government, seceded from the Union in 1983, then declared war on the U.S., and then immediately surrendered and asked for foreign aid. It's a rather amusing story that you can all look up online. (Or read in the book "The Conch That Roared.) While many people refer to Key West as the Conch Republic, in reality the KEYS are the Conch Republic, with Key West as its capital city.

Many movies have been shot in or took place in Key West or the Keys. Most recently, the movie "Fool's Gold" was set in Key West, but clearly was not shot here. I know this to be true even though I have never seen the movie. How? Well, in the movie, the island of "Key West" has a huge mountain in the middle of it. Not only are there no mountains in FLORIDA, there aren't even all that many hills, and the highest natural point in Key West is a whopping 17 feet above sea level.

What IS at the center of Key West is quite different: its cemetery. With some lovely graves and a few humorous ones, including the very famous "I told you I was sick," and the not as famous but still amusing "I'm just resting my eyes."

Rumor has it that one of the duties of the janitor at the original Sloppy Joe's (located where Captain Tony's is now) was to, if Hemingway got too drunk, put him in a wheelbarrow and wheel him down Whitehead Street to his home. Considering the size of Hemingway (not a small man) and the distance of the trip (about a half mile, I think), that was no mean feat.

Fully half of the island didn't exist a few decades ago. Back when they did the dredging to create the harbor (or "Bight" as they call it here), they used the land removed from under the water to increase the size of the island, thus creating "New Town," where a lot of residents live. The downtown, original area is generally referred to as "Old Town."

While I have a lot of trivia in my pointy little head from having lived here for 12 years, my friend Photo Dude is virtually an encyclopedia of Key West trivia. He knows far more than I do, some of it even interesting (though much of it quite dull).

Coldest recorded temperature in Key West: 41F. Highest: 98F. I've seen temps close to both in my 12 years here. But no, the only snow you'll find here comes in cones. Which makes the question my friend once got even stupider than most: "The roads here are pretty narrow...how do they get the snowplows down them?" :lol:

STATE: motto - Keep (city) Wierd!

While I loved my short time in your city, I have to tell you, they are hardly the only ones with that slogan. We have it here in Key West, and I have seen similar ones from Aspen, Colorado. Not that there's anything wrong with that....we need MORE weird places, if you ask me.

We're also the only state where the Armed Forces have been used against the citizens.

Not true, though of course the government won't admit it. Armed forces have been used in many instances in operations against its own instances in the War on Drugs, among other things. I won't go into detail on that, as that is the kind of thing that should be in fratching.

Although I have been informed that my future hometown is the lightning capital of the world or something, so I guess I won't be racing foil boats in the streets during rainstorms.

Then you must be moving to Tampa, Florida. One of the few bits of trivia I know about the REST of Florida is that Tampa is, indeed, the Lightning Capital of the World. Hey, they even named their hockey team the Tampa Lightning!

Has a local "city" accent that has more than once been described as "Brooklynese on qualuudes"

The month I spent there, I was truck by how similar the accent was to New Yawk....though with a decidedly different twist to it.

HOLY CRAP! I know way too much trivia about Key West and Arizona!

protege
12-18-2011, 04:20 AM
Quite a few movies have been shot in and around Pittsburgh--Dogma, Wonder Boys, Sudden Death, and Gung Ho (some scenes were done at the county airport...less than 2 miles from me), to name a few.

1. We have the first museum of modern art--the Carnegie, which opened in 1895.
2. The first smiley :-) was at Carnegie Mellon University, in 1982.
3. First polio vaccine, 1953.
4. First US commercial radio station (KDKA), 1920
5. First baseball stadium (Forbes Field), 1909
6. First simultaneous heart, liver, and kidney transplant, 1989.
7. First public TV station (WQED), 1954

Other local inventions include the Ferris wheel (1892/93), alternating current (1885), the air brake for trains (1860s), the Klondike ice cream bar (1929), bingo (1920),

Let's not forget the celebrities either...a few include Gene Kelly, Henry Mancini, George Benson, Perry Como, Rachel Carson, Michael Keaton, The Vogues, Rusted Root, Tony Dorsett, Joe Montana, Johnny Unitas, Joe Namath, Dan Marino, Jim Kelly...all had roots here.

Jester
12-18-2011, 04:28 AM
Protege, wasn't "Striking Distance" with Bruce Willis shot there as well?

And thanks for reminding me about bands....The Tubes and The Refreshments were from Arizona, and the Gin Blossoms were the house band at an awesome bar in my home town of Tempe. If you've ever heard their song "Mrs. Rita," it's about a fortune teller's on University Drive. I used to pass it almost daily when I was in college.

And since we are talking music, let's not forget some of the great musicians that came from Florida, including Tom Petty, .38 Special, The Outlaws, and the band that made "Sweet Home Alabama" famous, Lynyrd Skynyrd, along with many other "Southern Rock" bands that I forget at the moment. And yeah, Miami Sound Machine, which made Gloria Estefan famous.

And while the only famous musician from Key West actually grew up in Mississippi (Jimmy Buffett), we can rightfully claim that the very first Margaritaville Cafe opened up here in 1985. I still go there from time to time, though never during Parrothead week. *shudder*

firecat88
12-18-2011, 05:12 AM
The Refreshments were from Arizona, and the Gin Blossoms were the house band at an awesome bar in my home town of Tempe.

I love both of these bands. My sister introduced me to their music (and she's met Roger Clyne)

Eisa
12-18-2011, 05:18 AM
Idaho is the Gem State...even though everyone knows us only for potatoes, it seems. :p You can get huckleberries here. :D And huckleberry-flavored things. -drools- I love all things huckleberry, if you couldn't tell.

Um....there's a law in Idaho that says you can't fish for trout from the back of a giraffe. And here, it was illegal not to smile, so in 1987, we were declared the "U.S. Smile Capital."

I think Napoleon Dynamite was filmed in/near Shelley?

For some reason, people tend to find it hard to pronounce our capital. Or...well, a lot of cities in Idaho.

Where I live is mentioned in a song sung by Judy Garland...and later, in a song sung by John Fogerty.

Billie Bird was born here.

ShadowBall
12-18-2011, 06:10 AM
Man, there is nothing interesting about either my hometown or even the county! I guess the only thing that comes to mind is the host of a paranormal investigation show on A&E is a local (and since it's not Ghost Hunters, I don't care).

And we're also known for the extremely large human skeletons found at a local landmark (not specifically my town, but a little ways away).We used to be known for our massive production of meth too, but I guess that stopped being cool after about two years.

BeenThereDoneThat
12-18-2011, 07:46 AM
I'll start with my hometown in New Jersey. It's also the hometown of Jon Bon Jovi and teenage/young adult home of Greg Evigan. Some early silent films were shot there, before the movie industry made its big move to Hollywood. One of the duPont Company's largest plants is located there.

The city where I live now is the birthplace of Jim Morrison of The Doors, though his family didn't live here long (his dad was military). Darrell Hammond of SNL fame is also from my city. Harris Corporation has its headquarters here, and yes, our city was named after the much larger one in Australia. :p

I think Jester already covered Florida pretty well!!

protege
12-18-2011, 06:56 PM
Protege, wasn't "Striking Distance" with Bruce Willis shot there as well?

I think so, but it's been awhile since I've seen that one. Quite a few movies get shot in and around Pittsburgh, because many of the neighborhoods haven't changed much. They can easily represent other areas--for example, the Temptations miniseries (which was set in Detroit)...was filmed in the Oakland section of Pittsburgh.

fireheart
12-18-2011, 09:32 PM
A new fun fact I discovered this morning while on chat:

This is arguably more website-related, but the local paper's website has a "frizz factor" in its weather :p

ETA: Another film I discovered that was filmed in Adelaide (about 1/2 of it was), which may not have been released overseas, is Hey Hey It's Esther Blueberger. Three high schools were used to shoot the film: an all-girls private school (which has since become a co-ed primary school), an all-boys private school and a public high school. The whole film is centred around a girl stuck at a private school who has a tough life at home, she meets a girl from a public school and goes there under the pretense of being a Swedish exchange student.

Maria
12-18-2011, 10:03 PM
I have, in fact, stood on a corner in Winslow, Arizona, just like in the Eagles song. If you ever get to Winslow you will understand that that is pretty much the most exciting thing you can do there.

There's also a festival every summer! The Standing on a Corner festival... which is about the same level of excitement as standing on the corner the rest of the time, except that they play that song on an endless loop for the entire three or four days. But you can stand on the corner with my aunt's killer-awesome pizza in your hand, so that almost makes up for it. I do feel slightly humbled, though, that after living in AZ for 20 years, I didn't know half of the stuff you mentioned!

I do know, however, that the westernmost conflict of the Civil War occurred at Picacho Peak, between Phoenix and Tucson. And if you have a thing for reenactments, or cannons with entirely too much powder put into them, you can go watch the battle sometime in March each year.

Then you must be moving to Tampa, Florida. One of the few bits of trivia I know about the REST of Florida is that Tampa is, indeed, the Lightning Capital of the World. Hey, they even named their hockey team the Tampa Lightning!

Fort Lauderdale, actually, although in the past two days, I've heard the same thing said about Orlando and Pensacola, too. I'm hoping they're just exaggerating the lightning situation, but somehow I think I can find ways to entertain myself without getting struck, anyhow. And after reading about Key West, I'm hoping to have time to get over that way, when the spouse and I go on our house-hunting excursion next September. Meant to make it there in Sept, when I was back east but... er... well there was this guy teaching alligator wrestling, and I'd never even seen a gator before, and it really went downhill from there.

Oh, and since I just thought of it, the city where I grew up, Fresno, CA, has the only university campus in the U.S. that has a licensed commercial winery. It's pretty good stuff, too.

And I've never been able to independently verify this story, but my family tells this one every couple of holidays or so. Back in about 85 or so, one of the ice cream companies had this habit of rolling out one new flavor a year, and that year, they had selected from some choices, including one that was vanilla ice cream with crushed-up Oreo cookies in it. But they thought it was too simple and childish, and wouldn't appeal to their adult buyers, so they selected a peach ice cream recipe. And then Fresno had a massive storm (which is the only part of the story I'm 100% on, because to this day, I remember THAT storm!) that wiped out the peach crops. So they fell back on cookies n' cream, which became one of their most popular flavors.

Mytical
12-18-2011, 11:24 PM
Not exactly a fun fact, but my home town was only put on the map of ohio after an easter riot at our maximum security prison. Which (random bit of trivia here) is within a foot ball field length from our Elementary and High School.

Jester
12-19-2011, 01:06 AM
I think so, but it's been awhile since I've seen that one. Quite a few movies get shot in and around Pittsburgh, because many of the neighborhoods haven't changed much. They can easily represent other areas--for example, the Temptations miniseries (which was set in Detroit)...was filmed in the Oakland section of Pittsburgh.

Well, this film was set in Pittsburgh, and I believe it was also SHOT primarily in PiIttsburgh, but I figured you would know more than I would....

I do feel slightly humbled, though, that after living in AZ for 20 years, I didn't know half of the stuff you mentioned!

You need to study your state history more. All of this was stuff I knew off the top of my head, to be honest.

do know, however, that the westernmost conflict of the Civil War occurred at Picacho Peak, between Phoenix and Tucson.

I knew that, but didn't mention it. Arizona has one Civil War casualty, total.

Fort Lauderdale, actually, although in the past two days, I've heard the same thing said about Orlando and Pensacola, too.

Fort Lauderdale, Orlando, Pensacola....all lovely places. But the FACT remains that Tampa is the Lightning Capital of the World. And I don't say that from any bias or personal opinion, but simply from the fact of the matter that it's TRUE.

MoonCat
12-19-2011, 02:44 AM
Hey Jester, I rode through Winslow, AZ once on a Greyhound bus! Of course that song went through my head at the time. Have to say I agree with you, didn't see much reason to hang around.

Always wanted to see the Grand Canyon...from the ground. Flying west, I went over it. It was a long time ago and I still have that picture in my head. There really are no words for it.

And FYI, the bars up here are open until 4 AM too.:p

AccountingDrone
12-19-2011, 03:15 AM
Oh, and since I just thought of it, the city where I grew up, Fresno, CA, has the only university campus in the U.S. that has a licensed commercial winery. It's pretty good stuff, too.



Hubby's mom lives in Fresno, though he was born and lived for 4 years in Bakersfield, Mafia capital of California; he spent the next 14 years in Kerman. His mom used to live across the street from Sonny Barger's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sonny_Barger) second in command until she moved to the Tower (http://www.towerdistrict.org/) district.


Fresno is apparently known for an amazingly high proportion of millionaires, who knew. It has one of the oldest organized fire departments (http://www.fresno.gov/Government/DepartmentDirectory/Fire/AboutFresnoFire/default.htm) in the US.

mikoyan29
12-19-2011, 04:21 AM
I took the train through Winslow....

Anyways...My State...Where to start:
We are called the Wolverine State although there hasn't been a naturally occuring wolverine for over 200 years (there were a couple a few years ago but they died).

We have the country's only floating Zip Code (48222)

We had the first sunken urban expressway (The Davision)

We had the first traffic light (of some form)

We fought a war with Ohio over Toledo....lost it and got the Upper Peninsula.

The only US state in the 48 where you can look south to Canada.

Jester
12-19-2011, 05:46 AM
And FYI, the bars up here are open until 4 AM too.:p

Oh, I know that there are other places where the bars are open till 4. But down here, with the combination of the great weather and large number of bars, it just adds to the drunken insanity.

Just out of curiousity, where is "here"?

drunkenwildmage
12-19-2011, 01:36 PM
oh..lets see.

A 'non-fighting' war between 2 states were fought over this city.. The only 'casualty' I believe was a horse.

We are considered 'Home of the Jeep' and it's still manufacturered here.

We are located on swampland that was drained in the 1800s to make way for farming.

Despite the fact that we are located in the US 'Midwest' we do have some sand dunes around here.

An Ex-Mayor is famous for (among things) for suggesting that 'We move all the deaf people to the Airport' :doh:

The Flight Director for Apollo 13 was born and raised here.

CloserToSane
12-19-2011, 09:32 PM
It's a port city, among other things it's called the "Birthplace of America" as John Cabot sailed from Bristol to North America in 1497.

It's also called "City of Spires". This can explain why it was so heavily bombed during the Blitz.

We have the oldest Methodist church in the city centre.

Blackbeard once had a hideaway cave under St. Mary Redcliffe church. His original birthplace and childhood home are still on the harbourside. Oh and the pub he drank in.

St Mary Redcliffe was described by Queen Elizabeth I as, "the fairest, goodliest, and most famous parish church in England.".

Aardman animations (Wallace and Gromit, among others) are based in Bristol.

We've got, and I quote a local charity single "a really big bridge". The Cilfton Suspension Bridge, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel.

We used to run on "Bristol time", about five minutes behind everyone else.

The world’s first commercially produced chocolate bar was made in Union Street Bristol by Fry’s in 1847.

The town wasn't meant to be called Bristol, it was Brigstow. However the dialect lends to the "L" at the end, and thus, Bristol.

Plenty of programmes have been filmed in Bristol (lots of BBC): Casualty, Holby City, Mistreses, Skins, Deal or No Deal, Teachers, Only Fools and Horses, House of Elliott, Being Human. We've also had a couple of films shot in the immediate area this year.

EyeTeaGuy
12-20-2011, 05:46 PM
I'm a rarity - a Colorado NATIVE.

1. Over 75% of all land in the entire United States with an elevation above 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) is in Colorado.

2. All 54ish peaks in the Rocky Mountains above 14,000 feet are in Colorado - the Fourteeners.

3. Every square inch of Colorado is at least 3,000 feet above sea level. (914m)

4. The lowest point in Colorado (on Kansas border) is higher than the highest point in Pennsylvania.

5. Leadville, CO once was the richest city in the USA, if not the world, due to silver strikes. It is also the highest elevation incorporated city in the world.

6. Eisenhower Tunnel on I-70 is the world's highest vehicle tunnel.

7. Denver claims to be the birthplace of the Cheesburger. The guy who invented it first tried chocolate as a topping.

8. The cliff dwellings at Mesa Verde are some of the oldest permanent structure residences on the American continents. Nobody really knows what happened to the Anasazi, who built them.

9. In south-central Colorado lies the remnants of an ancient super-mega-hyper-duper volcano (La Garita Caldera) which went KABLOOEY about 25 million years ago. Only one eruption since the time of the dinosaurs MAY have been larger. Mt St Helens let loose 1/5000th of the material that La Garita did. Ash likely fell on the eastern seaboard and the Carribean. (And for you non US-types, Colorado a couple thousand miles away from places like NYC/DC.) 100,000 times larger (energy wise) than the Tsar Bomba, largest nuke ever detonated. Most energetic event since the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs.

10. Frozen Dead Guy Days in Nederland, CO celebrate a person who was kept on dry ice in a shed by his family/sons, in hopes of being resurrected. Coffin races, that kind of thing.

11. Boulder, CO is probably the most liberal city in existence outside of San Francisco or Cal-Berkley, and even then it is a tossup.

12. Pueblo, CO has the highest amount of living Medal Of Honor recipients anywhere.

13. Mosquito Pass, in the mountains of Colorado, was named because the settlers couldn't settle on a name, then shut their book - and where they would have written said name, they squashed a mosquito.

14. To build Denver International Airport, they moved 1/3rd the volume of earth moved to build the flippin' PANAMA CANAL.

15. DIA's land area is larger than the island of Manhattan.

16. Had the aliens in Independence Day had brains, Colorado would have been hit first - the "Golf Balls" on Buckley AFB in Aurora are radar dishes that relay information to NORAD for missle defense. Yes, the NORAD that was in Cheyeanne Mountain, and now at an AFB down in Colorado Springs.

17. The makers of Die Hard 2 freaked pretty much the entire city OUT - that plane crash in the movie? Yeah, that was filmed at our airport at the time, which was about 6 blocks north of my house. Seemingly half of the city called 911.

18. Look up "The Sleeper House" - a really weird house on I-70 a bit into the mountains, that looks a bit like a soft taco on its side. Was where Woody Allen filmed a movie. I've been in it - my cousin was the one who purchased it a few years ago and renovated/added on to it. It is JUST as weird and futuristic-y and Jetson-y on the inside. On a clear day, you can see the new airport from it, which is somewhere between 40 and 50 miles away. (64-80 km away)

For some absolutely fascinating reading, try and get a copy of "Colorado" by John Fielder - an awesome photographer, he went around re-creating exactly some shots from a photographer that was around 100 years before his shots, and it is fascinating how the places change and some stay the same.

Treasure
12-20-2011, 07:48 PM
One of the four States that border Mexico, and I believe the one with the longest border with Mexico.


Sorry to disappoint you sir, but that distinction does in fact belong to Texas, we call it the Rio Grande, its a river, maybe you've heard of it?

the AZ/ Mex border is only 389 miles long, whereas the TX/Mex border is 1254 miles long....

reimero
12-20-2011, 09:21 PM
My hometown:
1. Was the former headquarters for Studebaker.
2. Is the (current) home of the College Football Hall of Fame.
3. Is the hometown of actress Vivica Fox, women's basketball player Skylar Diggins and NASCAR driver Ryan Newman.

Jester
12-21-2011, 06:56 AM
4. The lowest point in Colorado (on Kansas border) is higher than the highest point in Pennsylvania.

And higher than the highest point in Florida. Easily. I didn't look this up, mind you. I just know how flat and low Florida is. There is just no way that any part of Colorado is lower than any part of Florida.

7. Denver claims to be the birthplace of the Cheesburger. The guy who invented it first tried chocolate as a topping.

So does Buffalo, New York. Seems like we have an East-West battle heating up....

Sorry to disappoint you sir, but that distinction does in fact belong to Texas, we call it the Rio Grande, its a river, maybe you've heard of it?

the AZ/ Mex border is only 389 miles long, whereas the TX/Mex border is 1254 miles long....

I did say that I believed that to be the case. I have also been known to say, repeatedly on this site, that I reserve the right to be horribly and even embarrassingly wrong.

Such as at moments like, say...this.

morgana
12-21-2011, 02:22 PM
My home town is the only town of its name in the world.

Plattsmouth, Nebraska, is named for its location at the point where the Platte River meets the Missouri River. Platte's Mouth.

Only significant fact about my hometown. *shrug*

dalesys
12-21-2011, 07:55 PM
I knew that, but didn't mention it. Arizona has one Civil War casualty, total.
It may be more now.

A fellow I've worked with was in the Arizona Highway Patrol 70s/80s working 3 days on / 4 off (12 hour shifts).

On his off days he and his buddy would research old mining claims and then go out exploring and try to find them.

He got far enough into one tunnel to need his headlamp, turned it on... and he warn't alone!:eek:

There was a Union courier, apparently wounded by Indians, still holed up in there.

His uniform (wool) in in a museum and Mr. D has the soldier's revolver plus a commendation from the DOD because they were able notify the soldier's next-of-kin after 110 or so years.

bhskittykatt
12-21-2011, 08:18 PM
The only US state in the 48 where you can look south to Canada.

Hate to burst your bubble but....here in WA state we can look south to Canada, too. Victoria is the only provincial capital south of the 49th, I believe. It's actually SW of where I'm at right now, in the US. So...one of two states in the 48 where you can look south to Canada. :p (In Point Roberts, you can look directly south on the Gulf Islands.)

dawnfire
12-21-2011, 10:22 PM
I live in Whittlesea, just outside Melbourne.

We have our own country music festival and host the victorian country music awards.

We have a show (kind a like a fair) that is 150+ years old.

We were the hub for alot of the relief efforts after black saturday (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_Victorian_bushfires). A lot of the relief centers were outside my street (i didn't live there at the time).

slightly further afield

we have the oldiest water supply for melbourne (yan yean reservoir, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yan_Yean_Reservoir )

parts of mad max was filmed locally

a roadhouse which is up pretty sally just outside wallan (http://www.madmaxmovies.com/making/madmax/PrettySallyRoadhouse/index.html)

where Goose rolls the UTE which is on Bridge Inn Road (ttp://www.madmaxmovies.com/making/madmax/BridgeInnRoad/index.html)

Jester
12-21-2011, 10:28 PM
It may be more now.

A fellow I've worked with was in the Arizona Highway Patrol 70s/80s working 3 days on / 4 off (12 hour shifts).

There was a Union courier, apparently wounded by Indians, still holed up in there.

Well, since I had to take State History my senior year of high school (1987-1988), and they only ever mentioned one casualty, I am going to guess that he was not considered a Civil War casualty.

Then again, by casualty they meant "killed in battle." This guy apparently was not. Though I am sure there were plenty of non-battle casualties like this in any war, including the CW.

Linda
12-21-2011, 10:49 PM
My city is the capital of Wales.
Roald Dahl was born here and his childhood home is part of my old high school -the same school attended by Charlotte Church albeit a couple of years after me.
Doctor Who, Torchwood, Sherlock and (now) Casualty are filmed here.
The pirate Captain Morgan was born in my suburb in a hall which still stands. It's now a pub. It's said that Llywelyn Ein Llyw Olaf, the last Welsh Prince of Wales is buried at the site of the hall.
We have the world oldest record store
We have more parks and open spaces per head than any other town or city in the UK
The local accent is AWFUL. :D

Salted Grump
12-22-2011, 12:56 AM
From Canada.

My city has...

The World's largest Skating rink (Rideau Canal), running nearly 8 kilometres in length of 'cleared' ice, including the entirety of Dow's Lake.

The distinction of being a compromise choice that wasn't even on the ballot when we chose a capital city; before then it was a logging village called Bytown, (after Colonel By, whose brainchild is mentioned above)

Our National War Museum was deliberately designed to look like an overgrown world war 2 bunker, and is built into the Lebreton Flats to the west of the Capital buildings.

The University of Ottawa's technical studies buildings, from 1970-something until 1985-90ish , were powered by a single 'slowpoke' nuclear reactor in the basement, around half the size of a conventional 'boiler'; saved the UO nearly 45K a year by powering four (BIG) buildings.

The Hogsback Waterfall, right next to the Headquarters of the Post Office, is actually an upthrust faultline; we get earthquakes as powerful as 5.5 every ten or so years.

The World's longest Highway passes through the Downtown core of Ottawa, and is known as the 'Queensway' within the city's metropolitan district.

Nortel, Corel, Mitel, Cognos and JDS Uniphase were all founded within Ottawa, though only Corel has maintained its market presence with its graphics programs.

Winterlude is the largest festival in Canada, taking over nearly a third of the city's downtown core, and has as a major focal point, the Rideau skateway, and 'beaver tail' pastries, which, yes, was founded in Ottawa.

The Tulip Festival is, arguably, the largest tulip festival in the world, and every tulip planted for the festival, though only 20,000 actually come from the Netherlands every year, is considered a gift from the Dutch Royal Family in gratitude for Canada's sheltering of the family during World War 2. In fact, Princess Margriet was born in the Ottawa Civic Hospital, with the maternity ward at the time being legally defined as international soil for the occasion, allowing the newly-born princess to gain Dutch citizenship through her mother, instead of gaining canadian citizenship due to being born in a claimed territory.

We have, arguably, the worst statue for arachnophobes to tolerate standing next to the national Gallery; 'Maman', a 30-foot tall bronze cast of a spider carrying an egg sac. It has 'siblings', physically identical in nearly every way, in London, Des Moines, Tokyo, Seoul, St. Petersburg, Bilbao, Kansas City, and Doha.

The Rideau Canal is also a UNESCO World heritage site.

We have six 'sister' Cities; Beijing, Seoul, Buenos Aires, Catania, Palermo, and Campobasso.

IMAX is canadian, and one of its first useable screens were installed in the Museum of Civilization, which is the most-visited museum in Ottawa.

During Remembrance Day, it became impromptu tradition that, everyone participating in the ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier would remove the poppy customarily worn as a symbol and place it on the raised capstone of the tomb, sometimes with pictures or letters to loved ones lost; this tradition has extended to Canada day, where people leave miniature canadian flags atop the tomb as a symbol of respect.

AnaKhouri
12-22-2011, 01:33 AM
I saw the one in Tokyo, in Roppongi. SO GROSS! :eek:

Sapphire Silk
12-22-2011, 02:06 AM
Wow! What a great thread. As usual I seem to be late to the party, but I have a few to include:

My hometown, Waldorf MD, is well known for the slot machines it used to have in the 60's (not anymore, though--illegal since the 70's). Often, when I tell people in other parts of the country where I'm from, the slot machines are the first thing to pop up.

I grew up a hop skip and a jump from the family farm of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who was imprisoned in the Dry Tortugas prison for setting the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth after he assassinated President Abraham Lincoln. My best friend in high school was a descendant of Dr. Mudd, who had 9 kids . . . five of whom were born AFTER he was released from prison for his efforts combating yellow fever among the guards and prisoners.

The phrase "your name is mud" comes from the trial of Dr. Mudd.

The British marched through where my housing development is on their way to burn Washington DC during the War of 1812. Local legend has it a British soldier died on the march and haunts the local area.

Maryland has two rivers with the same name: Wicomico (pronounced Why-com-i-co). One is in Charles County, where I grew up. The other is in Wicomico County and runs through the city of Salisbury, where I lived for about 10 years.

There is a Hollywood, Maryland and a California, Maryland in Southern Maryland.

I also lived in Delaware for about a year. There is a border town called Delmar, that bills itself "the town too big for one state." Delaware has 3 counties: Sussex, Kent, and Newcastle. The inhabitants are very different from one another, leading to the joke that Delaware is 3 states in search of a county.

Bandit
12-22-2011, 02:53 AM
Hometown:

Until Hurricane Katrina, it held the record of the largest peacetime evacuation of a city. It was because of a train wreck - and I remember that one.

Current:

Capitol of the country.

B

Immortal1982
12-22-2011, 03:35 AM
I live in a town called olyphant. One of our most famous citizens was a baseball hall of fame umpire named Nestor Chylak. He most famously handled 3 forfeit games in the 1970's including the infamous 10 cent beer night and disco demolition night.

jnd4rusty
12-22-2011, 03:49 AM
I live in South Dakota and I have a decent list of interesting facts..
1. South Dakota has one of the largest Native American populations, with nine official tribes and some 60,000 people.

2. Home of the internationally known Sturgis Rally and Races, which now spans approximately 15 days and hosts people from all over the world, the city of Sturgis and surrounding area becomes a motorcyclists playground.

3. Carrie Ingalls lived most of her adult life in Keystone. Her family lived in DeSmet, South Dakota where they still hold Laura Ingalls Wilder days. Rose Wilder Lane was born in DeSmet.

4. The Black Hills of South Dakota holds two national caves, Wind Cave National Park and Jewel Cave National Monument, Jewel Cave is the fourth largest cave in the world.

5. The name "Black Hills" comes from the Lakota words "Paha Sapa" which means "hills that are black".

6. Belle Fourche is the geographical center of the United States, designated in 1959.

7. Mitchell is the home of the world's only Corn Palace, built with 3,000 bushels of ear corn.

8. Home of Mount Rushmore, drilling began on the four faces of Mount Rushmore National Memorial in 1927, the work stopped shortly after Gutzom Borglum died in 1941 and cost over $1 million, it was never completed as Borglum wanted to do a Hall of Records. It is called the "Shrine of Democracy" and brings in at least 2 million visitors a year.

9. Harney Peak, at an elevation of 7,242 feet is the highest point east of the Rocky Mountains.

10. South Dakota is the home of the Dakota, Lakota, and Nakota tribes which make up the Sioux Nation.

11.Wind Cave contains the world's largest display of a rare formation called "boxwork".

12. The USS South Dakota was the most decorated battleship during WWII

13. It has been estimated that 90% of the women living in Deadwood SD in 1876 were prostitutes.

14. Sioux/Dakotah Indian greeting is "How Kola" which means "Hello Friend".

15.Spearfish SD holds the worlds record for the fastest temperature change. It happened in 1943 and the temp went from -4 degrees to 45 degrees in two minutes.

16. Famous South Dakotans: Tom Brokaw, Cheryl Ladd, Hubert Humphrey, Crazy Horse, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Catherine Bach, Sitting Bull, Red Cloud, Russell Means, George McGovern, Tom Daschle, Mary Hart and Adam Vinatieri, there are more but I am too tired to list them.

That is all for now, there are more interesting facts but I will post those another time because this is long enough!!

Jester
12-22-2011, 06:11 AM
I grew up a hop skip and a jump from the family farm of Dr. Samuel Mudd, who was imprisoned in the Dry Tortugas prison for setting the broken leg of John Wilkes Booth after he assassinated President Abraham Lincoln.

Tie in here....Dr. Mudd was imprisoned at Fort Jefferson in the Dry Tortugas, which are 70 miles off of Key West. And to get there, you basically have to come here. We have a couple of boat companies that will take you out to the Tortugas on any given day, and some people camp there for a couple days. And, while I have done much that there is to do in Key West, I have yet to go to the Tortugas.

7. Mitchell is the home of the world's only Corn Palace, built with 3,000 bushels of ear corn.

I have actually been there (as well as Rapid City), and the Corn Palace is....interesting. Very, very interesting.

Greenday
12-22-2011, 07:08 AM
The movie Annie was mostly filmed at our local college (now Monmouth University). They have mansions that were used in the movies for filming.

New Jersey: It is the greatest Jersey (Suck it, England). More cars are stolen in Newark, NJ than any other city (You could combine NYC and LA and they still can't compete with Newark). New Jersey is home to the oldest seashore resort in the country (Cape May). Has more diners than anywhere else in the world. NJ is home to the largest seaport in the US (Elizabeth). All the properties in Monopoly were based off of Atlantic City.

Seshat
12-22-2011, 07:23 AM
I grew up in Brisbane, Queensland (Australia):

* One of the modern Seven Wonders of the World: the Great Barrier Reef. As with the Grand Canyon, you don't really 'get it' until you see it. And like the Canyon, it's too large for a human to see from any single location - except space.
It's 2,600km (1,600m) long, stretching from Cape York to just north of Brisbane.

* It's a city built on a floodplain in a zone that gets occasionally hit by cyclones. (cyclone/typhoon/hurricane - similar or identical events). Unlike New Orleans, we are above sea level - mostly. But my parents very wisely chose to live on the side of a hill, and outside the main part of the river delta.
Traditional buildings in Queensland are built on stilts, both for this reason, and for cooling.

* Home of the 'Queenslander' architectural style: built on stilts, verandahs (covered porches?) on three or four sides of the house (east, north and west, and sometimes south - remember, to us, the sun is north in the sky); and a pyramid roof with the top of the pyramid chopped off, and a smaller pyramid above it. The roof design allows the heat to escape through the vent space created by the double-peak.
I can't find examples of the roof online (in a quick search): all the ones I'm seeing are the expensive, fancy houses, not the working class houses.
If you don't have electricity and need cooling but not much heating, this style works wonderfully!

* Coronation Drive in Brisbane (http://maps.google.com.au/maps?q=google+maps+coronation+drive+brisbane&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x6b9150a35d549b27:0xd76e63c45afc5e0,Coronat ion+Dr,+Brisbane+QLD&gl=au&ei=KtbyToibMeK0iQf-pKHDAQ&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CCcQ8gEwAA) is along the river itself. It earned its name because the Queen did a procession along there after her - gasp - Coronation. During her Australian visit.
If you look at the google-maps link I put up, near the Wesley Hospital and a small park is Land Street. Part of Coronation drive fell into the water one year, and Land Street is where they had to put the detour.

* World War II trivia:
- There's a building in Brisbane City called MacArthur Chambers. I've been told that this was the General's headquarters for part of the Pacific Theatre fighting during WWII.
- There's a notorious line called the 'Brisbane line': if all went poorly during WWII, the plan was to fall back to the Brisbane line and only defend the parts of Australia south-east of it. The line went from Brisbane to Adelaide, using the Murray/Darling and the Great Dividing Range as terrain advantage.

* Origins Trivia
- Moreton Bay (which the Brisbane River empties into) wasn't seen by Captain Cook, nor by most other white explorers, until there was a search for missing prisoners. Why anyone bothered to search this hard for them, I don't know!
Anyway, the prisoners had found what the explorers missed: that Fraser and Stradbroke islands are (a) separate from each other, and (b) islands. And behind them was a bay, and a river, and a thriving Aboriginal community.
- The area then became the Moreton Bay prison colony, a 'hard time' colony. Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) was for the toughest of tough cases, Moreton Bay (Brisbane) got the ones too tough for Botany Bay (Sydney) but not hard enough for Van Diemen's Land.
- Once the Moreton Bay colony was opened up for immigration, we got a lot of German immigrants. There are a lot of Lutheran churches or former Lutheran churches in Brisbane, though not as many as in Adelaide (the first Australian colony that was never a prison colony).



Possibly more later.....

Eisa
12-22-2011, 10:13 AM
The city where I was born is known as The City of the Crosses. And has White Sands Missile Range. It's also mentioned in The Red Pyramid by Rick Riordan, which I found awesome. :D

Seshat
12-22-2011, 11:12 AM
The place I live now is Melbourne, Victoria, Australia:

* In the Goldfields (north and a bit west of Melbourne), we have one of Australia's only two serious civil 'wars': the Eureka Stockade. The Eureka Flag (http://wheelercentre.com/static/files/assets/20f43270/original-eureka_flag_size8.gif) is one of the candidates brought up every time we consider changing our flag to one that doesn't have the Union Jack.
(The other was the Rum Rebellion, which poor Captain/Governor Bligh - yes, the Mutiny on the Bounty Captain Bligh - was our Governor during. Poor chap got mutinied on, sent to Australia to be Governor, and got stuck with a rebellion.)

* Ned Kelly was hanged in Melbourne.

* Hrm. For Famous People - well, I (briefly) had a Wikipedia page. Does that count? (It got removed for insignificance. Waaah.) (I do still have two distinct mentions in Wikipedia. Yay!)

* I used to have a doctor (specialist in CFS, Fibro etc) who worked in Moonee Ponds, where 'Dame Edna Everage' famously came from.

* At one point, Melbourne was one of the largest cities in the world: population wise. Of course, this was when world population in general was much, much smaller. (Australia cannot support a population like modern 'population-high cities' - we don't have the arable land, and it costs too much to ship high-tonnage or high-volume stuff like food.)

Seshat
12-22-2011, 11:21 AM
Fun facts about Australia:

* Driest continent in the world. Or largest island, depending on which you prefer to call it.

* Tiny, tiny amount of arable land compared to the size of the continent. (or island.)

* Oldest continent in the world: as in, our surface land hasn't been refreshed by volcanic or tectonic activity in more aeons than anyone else's. We don't even get much in the way of ashfall from other continents' volcanoes.

* That contributes to our lack of arable land: our topsoil's main renewal process is erosion; which is slower than vulcanism. So (in general) we have poor topsoil. (We do have pockets of good topsoil, but fewer and smaller than the other continents.)

* First/oldest provable use of human-grade communication is the migration across the Malay peninsula, the Indonesian island chain and the Torres Strait islands to the tip of Queensland. All earlier migrations were land migrations, and did not absolutely require boats. This migration did, which meant it required organisation and cooperation.

* We may have cave paintings and rock paintings older than Lascaux. (Dating is in progress; but since the Aboriginals continued to paint in the same caves as part of their culture until my ancestors came along and decimated them, dating of our paintings is a matter of some dispute.)

* We DO have the longest known upkept tradition of cave paintings: there are still tribes in the less European-accessible areas of Australia whose cave-painting culture survives to this day.

* Ayer's Rock/Uluru is ours.

* The first Europeans to find Australia were NOT the British, but the Dutch. They found the west coast, declared it uninhabitable, and ignored it.

* Perth is closer to the Indian cities than to any of the other Australian cities.

BeenThereDoneThat
12-23-2011, 01:10 AM
And higher than the highest point in Florida. Easily. I didn't look this up, mind you. I just know how flat and low Florida is.

Britton Hill (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Britton_Hill) is the highest point in Florida, and paradoxically the lowest of any state's highest points. It stands at 345 feet/106 meters above sea level. It's only 2 miles south of the Alabama border up in the Panhandle. :)

Sapphire Silk
12-23-2011, 09:34 PM
6. Belle Fourche is the geographical center of the United States, designated in 1959.

I lived for a couple of years in Minot, ND (Why not Minot? Cuz Freezin's the reason!).

North Dakota has the geographical center of North America in Rugby ND (which has been mentioned in 2 Law and Order Episodes). I worked briefly at the Heart of America Medical Center in Rugby.

Salted Grump
12-24-2011, 02:47 AM
General Trivia about Canada:

-We have nearly 20% of the world's oil and natural gas reserves, a large margin of which is in the Oil Sands.

-The Canadian shield is, arguably, the largest slab of Precambrian rock known to exist, with its only real competition being all of Australia.

-Sudbury, known as the 'nickel' of Ontario, is partially built into the second-largest impact crater in the world, with the Chicxulub crater (alleged to have killed the dinosaurs) being roughly 10% smaller.

- The Geographic and Magnetic north Poles are both in Canadian territory (Geographic pole is disputed with Russia).

-Alert, Nunavut, is the Northernmost settlement in the world; it has a permanent population of five (down from nearly 75 when it was an active part of the DEW system), and is less than 900 kilometers from the Geographic North Pole.

-Canada has 'samples' of practically every biome known, barring tropical biomes. Yes, British Columbia has rainforests.

-Approximately 20% of the world's Uranium supply is Canadian, which has the highest natural density of the isotope in the raw ore. (Average of 23% uranium per ton of ore in Canada, while most other uranium mines hover between 0.5 and 2%) Canadal also produces nearly 30% of the world's refined uranium. (the US produces 2.5%)

EricKei
12-25-2011, 05:24 PM
More from me for da Big Easy...

Presumably due to the constantly-shifting, rich water-soaked earth underfoot, some plants thrive here that really have no business growing in this climate at all; I wanna say that palms, bananas and plaintains are among them.

When you go to a relative's house to "visit" for more than an hour or two, there is a decent chance that you will be sent home with a paper grocery bag full of excess food (deli meats, drinks, pints of gumbo or red beans, random leftovers, etc). This chance rises with each passing hour, and goes up exponentially if it's actually a party or a situation where you brought food to begin with. The food you take home is not necessarily related to what you bring. Case in point - the haul from last night's XMAS party: 3 2-liters of cokes, some fried chicken, and a bunch of mini-muffalettas. I brought them...brownies.

We do not think it is at all odd to have musicians (especially local bands) performing in retail establishments. E.g., yesterday, Benny Grunch an' da Bunch (http://www.bennygrunch.com/) were playing live in Walgreens, of all places, to a (politely) packed house, tho they made sure to leave room for shoppers to pass easily.

Many people here, especially in da'Burbs, are very hidebound. Or, to use the local version, they are of the "Laissez Faire" (lit, "Let It Be") persuasion. The notion of "change for the sake of change", aka "Progress when what we have works just fine", is entirely alien. They bank heavily on Tradition-with-a-capital-T.

We also tend to be somewhat xenophobic, even towards other Louisianians, to an extent. One of the most damning things a "local" can say about another person is that "he's not from here". In both politics and business, that one thing can be the one deciding factor in a choice between two candidates or potential business partners.

Zaiida
12-28-2011, 05:47 AM
Apparently my little rural town is the largest producer of olive oil in Australia and makes up 40-50% of the olive oil exports as well. It's won numerous interational awards as well over 150 of them. Really amazing since the company has only been around since 1996 and started selling in 2001.

Colour me surprised I only saw it in my supermarket last year and I though it was a quaint little company. Made my eyebrows meet my hairline when I found it how big this local company was and our local population is under 6,500 people.

We also have a lot of grapevines and local wineries and an absurd amount of cockatoos.

Cat
12-28-2011, 01:42 PM
I should visit CO. I find I'm happiest when I am above 3000'. Odd, since I was born in Tampa :)

Ok, fun fact about my old home town in CT...if you live near the Green, you cannot have colored Christmas lights, only white. A few people broke the rule this year.

Sapphire Silk
12-28-2011, 02:35 PM
I should visit CO. I find I'm happiest when I am above 3000'. Odd, since I was born in Tampa :)

Ok, fun fact about my old home town in CT...if you live near the Green, you cannot have colored Christmas lights, only white. A few people broke the rule this year.

Seems like an odd rule, and unenforceable.

kansasgal
12-28-2011, 07:00 PM
Where I am originally from is Portland, Or., also known as "Stumptown". That was going to be it's name until they took a vote.

They don't have sales tax in Oregon, and you can't pump your own gas (which really gets me confused when I go back there)

Oregon votes by mail. You get your ballot, decide who to vote for and mail it back (or drop it off). There are no polling places

Portland is known as the "City of Roses" and has the Rose Festival every year, also known to the single girls as "YIPPEE" as all of the Navy and Coast Guard boats come to town for a two week liberty. You can call "Dial a Sailor" and actually request one ....

Where I live now:

Junction City, Kansas is home of Fort Riley, home of the "Big Red 1"

Timothy McVeigh stayed here the night before he bombed Oklahoma City, and rented the U-Haul truck at one of our stores

dawnfire
12-28-2011, 10:26 PM
Apparently my little rural town is the largest producer of We also have a lot of grapevines and local wineries and an absurd amount of cockatoos.

We have an absurd amount of cockatoos too. At our last property we had a chicken coop and made the mistake of leaving the feeders out in the pen. now these feeders (it looked like this http://www.poultry.allotment.org.uk/poultry-equipment/poultry-117.html )held a lot of feed (about a few kgs worth). The following morning we came to a sight of cockatoos (50 or so) shoulder to shoulder on the coop fences eating all the chicken feed. needless to say we moved the feeders into the hen house.

Cat
12-28-2011, 10:27 PM
Seems like an odd rule, and unenforceable.


It is odd, but the Green is in the historical district...so they want to keep it quaint, lol

BlaqueKatt
12-29-2011, 12:05 AM
we have an official city flag-it can be found here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Madison_Wisconsin_Flag.svg)

Canihelpurass
12-29-2011, 06:30 PM
My city has a to Scale model of the solar system spread through the city

Cat
12-30-2011, 01:39 PM
My city has a to Scale model of the solar system spread through the city


I've heard of this :). Did they boot poor Pluto? (I still claim its a planet!)

Kanalah
12-30-2011, 02:06 PM
my city installed the first parking meter. (sorry guys)

Chuck Norris was born in my state, so you know it's awesome.

We have a glass botanical garden downtown that was designed by I M Pei

Bart Conner and Nadia Comaneci live here :)

EyeTeaGuy
01-27-2012, 01:47 PM
Forgot one that is just too, too good to leave unsaid -

Denver is the only city in the history of the Olympics to be awarded the games, and then GIVE THEM BACK.

Denver was awarded the 76 winter games, since it would be the bicentennial for the country and the centennial for our state. (Our nickname IS the Centennial State, we got admitted in 1876)

In about 72 or so, the voters rejected some sales tax increases to pay for it. They were also concerned about what it would do to the "lifestyle" here, and thought everyone would want to come and live here, ruining it for the natives. Dumb, I know. Especially since the state population has more than doubled since 76, and is close to tripling....

Anyways, so CO has a bit to play in the Miracle On Ice from the 1980 Lake Placid Games - if the 76 games are played in Denver (They went to Innsbruck instead), there's no way the next games are in Lake Placid. Also, the tryout camp for that team was held down in Colorado Springs, since to this day the HQ for US Olympics is down there.

And Denver is thinking about bidding for the 2022 winter games....

Carina16
01-31-2012, 09:00 AM
Current town:

Has the first NASCAR sanctioned track.
Original home of Lowe's Food
Original home of Lowe's hardware
Parts of Days of Thunder filmed here
Hometown:

Daniel Boone's nephews started the first church in town
Tweetsie Railroad
Where the Lilys Bloom filmed here

barcode
02-02-2012, 09:58 AM
Hmmm... Let's see...

The City, river, county, bay, and the entire surrounding valley are named for "The Place of the Sauk"

We started in lumber, and moved to automotive production. We're so freaking good at the later, that we've had other competitors buying our products. No matter where in the world you are, if your car can turn left or right, there's an 80% chance that the steering gear was made here. If you bought a satellite dish back in the mid-to-late 80s, then we probably made the ball-screw gear assembly, too! I once had some gentlemen come into our toy store (a very big one - in fact, the "largest global" toy store at that time) looking for marbles. Why? They were celebrating the fact that they had just successfully cast sphere holes in a mold! (For those not up on metal casting, yes, that's pretty f#$%ing hard to do!)

The river that splits our city in twain is the only one in the US (or, possibly North America) that flows north along it's entire length. If you count the tributaries of the Shiawassee and Tittabawassee rivers, then they flow mostly northeast.

Birthplace of S. Epatha Merkerson (Law & Order), Theodore Roethke (poet), Serena Williams (tennis), Question Mark and the Mysterians ("96 Tears"), Dick Wagner (musician with Alice Cooper & Lou Reed), and Stevie Wonder (do I need to tell you who that is?). We happen to be just south of Madonna's birthplace, but the folks in that "smelly little town*", as she put it, are rather glad to get rid of her. (The smell comes from the production of sugar (from sugar beets) by the Monitor Sugar plant. I used to drive by it on my way to work, oddly enough, after leaving my home right next to... the Michigan Sugar plant (now closed down). From one odorous street to the other...)

Lefty Frizzell's only hit song was about a love he left, pined over, and married here (the lyrics claim his house was on the bay, but the city is a good 18 miles south of the bay, the bay is at -oddly enough- Bay City*/Essexville).

And if that wasn't enough music for you...

I personally know the guy who chauffeured a musical duo, calling themselves "Tom and Jerry", to appear live on a local radio show (kinda like a radio version of "American Bandstand"). In the waiting room, the tall guy (Tom) paced around, while the "little guy" (Jerry) sat in a corner, scribbling away in a notebook. He asked "Jerry" what he was doing. "Writing down some ideas for a song", replied Jerry. "Well", my friend joked to him, "you're in {city}, so the rules are if you write a song in {city}, you have to include it in your song!". Jerry nodded and said "Okay, I can do that.", and went back to writing. My friend thought the joke went sour.
As anyone with any knowledge of musical history has deduced, "Tom" was actually named Arthur Garfunkel, and "Jerry" was none other than Paul Simon. The song Paul was working on? "America". And, apparently, it took four days for them to hitchhike from here...

Our Ontario Hockey League team's mascot is named "Steagle Colbeagle" after the Comedy Central host. Colbert has never made a public appearance at, nor has he made any updates about, our team's progress in years. What's up with that, Steven?

On the show "Home Improvement", Tim's brother (in-law?) lived here. For Seinfeld fans, yes, our bottle/can deposit is $0.10 per item, the highest of the States.

On a per-capita basis, the FBI ranked us, for ten years running, as the most violent city in the US. We're now #3, behind "sister" cities Flint and Detroit. I... guess that's good?

Actually located just "off the Dixie" in Bridgeport, Amigo motor transports (motorized wheelchair/scooters you see in stores) got their start here (I almost got a job there).

A not-so-famous local celeb, Wally Stroebel. Who the hell is Wally? He's the guy standing next to General Dwight David Eisenhower as he's photographed saying his "good lucks" to the 101st Airborne before sending them over the Channel on 6Jun44 (D-Day: Normandy). When Ike learned where Wally was from, he replied, "I've been there - good fishing!" We like Ike!

Last I looked, we were one of only four cities in the US to have a Japanese Teahouse. Not "teashop", but teaHOUSE. Our sister city (Tokushima) sent over the wood, craftsmen, tools, and even some drummers (the "Awa Odori" troupe). These guys hand crafted, carved, and assembled the thing on the spot, and it is gorgeous! The cool thing? Not a single nail in it! All the joints interlock without help from braces and such. Amazing.

Morgana
Plattsmouth, Nebraska, is named for its location at the point where the Platte River meets the Missouri River. Platte's Mouth.
Only significant fact about my hometown. *shrug*
Hey! Allow me to add something for the good folks of Plattsmouth! The scout troop that I was a member of camped at a small stream just outside of the town. This can be verified by the couple... <ahem> "engaged in some activity"... in the back of their parked station wagon. If you were, or you happen to have heard/known, the couple that was startled by a group of boys hiking by, tapping the window, and exclaiming "Way to go!", then that was us. (This would've been Saturday morning, July 16, 1977.)
Note: The Platte isn't what one would call a "river". It's about a mile wide and an inch deep most of the time. I think the stream we camped next to had more flow than the Platte it drained into. Of course, that was during a drought - I'm sure it gets crazy during spring thaws and storms.

Eisa
You can get huckleberries here. And huckleberry-flavored things. -drools- I love all things huckleberry, if you couldn't tell.
I'll be your Huckleberry!
Don't forget to mention Idaho native Maj. Gregory "Pappy" Boyington, USMC! He was one of the top aces in the Pacific, and even had an NBC action series made about his outfit, VMF-214, titled "Baa Baa Black Sheep". Although played by Robert Conrad, Pappy looked more like the actor who played the General, Simon Oakland. Go figure.

Eisa
The city where I was born is known as The City of the Crosses.
Hey! I've been through there! When I was a kid, we passed through on our way to IL from CA. I remember stopping at a gas station for a while, and we met some Hopi (?) kids and played around for about an hour. Odd thing, that I remember that from when I was 5-6 years old, but don't remember much from the rest of the trip.

AnaKhouri
I live a couple miles from the Gate to Hell.
In our state, Hell is just down the road, near Ann Arbor. Yes, it does freeze over. If you want to go from Hell to Paradise, you'll need to head north about 276 miles, in the Upper Peninsula on Whitefish Bay. Yup, in Michigan, you can go to Hell from Paradise on one tank of gas...

Panacea
The phrase "your name is mud" comes from the trial of Dr. Mudd.
Richard Mudd, grandson of Samuel Mudd, lived here and kept up on the government to absolve his grandfather of the crime. His argument was that Dr. Mudd did not know Booth, and was obliged by his oath to attend to his wound, assassin or not. The counter argument was that "everybody and their Uncles knew Booth", and that the conspirators all named the Doc. In his defense, the Hiltons, Kardashians, all the "Housewives", and Lady Gaga (without makeup/costume) could all knock on my door, and I wouldn't be able to tell them from a troupe of very weird Jehovah's Witnesses...

Panacea
Maryland has two rivers with the same name: Wicomico
Michigan has two "Mackinaws". There's the Strait/Bridge/Island of "Mackinac", and just to the south of "Big Mac", the city, named "Mackinaw". No, that's not a typo. Both are pronounced "Mack-ih-naw", but only one is spelled "Mackinaw". If you pronounce it "Mack-ih-nack", Michiganders will shoot you. Ted Nugent will get the first shot. It's unlikely he will miss.

barcode

* To add, Bay City is the birthplace of Madonna, but also holds another peculiar musical connection: When a Scottish band had to choose a name for themselves, they just, in typical Scot fashion, threw a dart at a map of the US. It landed in Michigan's "Thumbpit", smack on Bay City. Hence the name, "Bay City Rollers". Anyone remember "Ess-Ay-Tee-You-Arr-Dee-Ay-Why...Night!" (Saturday Night)?

BeenThereDoneThat
02-02-2012, 07:01 PM
Nicely done, Barcode...I enjoyed reading that :)

MattW
02-03-2012, 11:19 PM
Norwich is famous for the production of mustard.

Apparently Norwich had the first council estate (project) in the UK...possible even Europe.

'The Canaries' is the nickname of the local soccer team. Currently in the FA Premier League. :)