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Ree
12-18-2011, 01:57 PM
I wanted to make a dessert recipe that my Mom made years ago, but I just discovered it called for raw eggs.

The eggs get beaten together with butter and icing sugar to make a creamy filling.
It's meant to be refrigerated,and I don't recall any of us getting sick whenever my Mom made it, but still, with all the talk of salmonella etc from raw egg, I really don't want to take a chance.

Does anyone know what I can use as a substitute?

Dave1982
12-18-2011, 02:03 PM
Well, they do make pasteurized eggs that are safe to eat raw. In the US those have to be marked as "egg products" beause of FDA regulations. Not sure what they'd be called in Canada.

Trouble is....I have no clue where to find them.

I've also heard anecdotally that free-range eggs are less prone to salmonella contamination but have no idea if that's true or not.

MaggieTheCat
12-18-2011, 02:07 PM
You can buy pasteurized eggs and egg products (eggs removed from the shell) for use in recipes that call for raw eggs. They should be sold near the rest of the eggs. I have used pasteurized raw eggs to make eggnog before. I think pasteurized egg products are considered the safest since they're removed from the shell.

lupo pazzesco
12-18-2011, 02:14 PM
have you considered tempering the eggs?

I do that when I'm making eggnog. beat the eggs and sugar together until fluffy, add warm milk then heat on low heat for about 3 minutes. Stays creamy, but warms up enough to kill any germs.

Other than that, yes, I'd go with pasteurized eggs and egg products, which can probably be found in a health food store or higher end grocer's.

42_42_42
12-18-2011, 04:53 PM
Generally speaking, the chances of getting salmonella from eating raw egg is so small* it's not really worth worrying about.


The risk of an egg being contaminated with Salmonella bacteria is very low, about 1 in 20,000 eggs. So, the likelihood that an egg might contain salmonella is extremely small – 0.005% (five one-thousandths of one percent). At this rate, if you’re an average consumer, you might encounter a contaminated egg once every 84 years. (http://www.incredibleegg.org/egg-facts/egg-safety/eggs-and-food-safety)

Ree
12-18-2011, 04:55 PM
Well, I was planning to take it to work for our Christmas pot luck on Tuesday, so I guess, if I do end up using the raw eggs, that I should make sure it stays refrigerated.
Some of that stuff sits out for several hours over the lunch periods, and nobody thinks to check the fridges.

(Will check at the store for pasteurized, just in case.)

taxguykarl
12-18-2011, 05:08 PM
I found pasteurized eggs in the dairy section of my favorite megamart, FWIW.

RecoveringKinkoid
12-18-2011, 08:08 PM
Even I don't eat raw eggs anymore, and it's hard as I do love me some raw cookie dough. I dont' even eat my eggs with runny yolks anymore, which breaks my heart as that's my favorite way to eat them.

The food industry has changed since we were younger, and some of the pathogens have gotten more virulent over the years due to the way food is mass processed. Me, I wouldn't risk it. There are salmonella strains out there that are killing people. You could eat raw eggs all the time when we were kids, and it was fine. Things are different now.

I'd go with the pasteurized eggs or I wouldn't do it.

iradney
12-18-2011, 08:19 PM
I dunno, I've never had any issues with eating raw eggs. And yep, I have gulped a few raw ones down. And raw cookie dough, cake dough etc.

However, it's been fresh or right out of the fridge...Something that's been sitting out on a buffet could get a bit dodgy...if you want, Ree, I'm willing to share a super awesome South African dessert that is as rich as sin and goes well with cream, custard or icecream, and is actually better if it sits for a few hours coz of the syrup you pour over it...

Ree
12-18-2011, 10:30 PM
That sounds yummy, iradney.

BlaqueKatt
12-19-2011, 01:54 AM
beat the eggs and sugar together until fluffy, add warm milk then heat on low heat for about 3 minutes. Stays creamy, but warms up enough to kill any germs.

heat lysis* of salmonella strains does not occur at any temperature under 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Heating salmonella to between 80-100 will cause the cellular metabolism to increase and they will flourish, not die. We incubate salmonella to grow it in the lab at 37C or 98.6F, yes the optimal temperature for salmonella to flourish is human body temperature, it's a fascinating bacterial strain, from a scientific standpoint.


Lysis=death by disintegration of the cellular structure.

emt_cookies
12-19-2011, 02:33 AM
I've seen the egg products usually by the butter/cheese or by the creamers. Not right next to the eggs, but in the general location.

Food Lady
12-19-2011, 05:24 AM
So I guess my 145 degree, runny-yolk eggs are not ok.

iradney
12-19-2011, 05:30 AM
Ok, here's the recipe: Malva pudding

Ingredients:
1 cup flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 tsp heaped baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
1 cup milk
1 tsp bicarb of soda
1 large egg
1 tbsp vinegar
2 tbsp apricot jam

Mix the milk and the bicarb. Mix the remaining ingredients in a seperate bowl, then add the milk (allow some space for the inevitable vinegar/bicarb reaction). Preheat oven to 160 degrees celcius and bake for 30 minutes. There will be some rising and collapsing, it's supposed to happen. Put a baking sheet beneath it in case it overflows.

Syrup:

1 cup sugar
1 cup milk
1/2 cup boiling water
1/4 cup butter
1 tsp vanilla

Boil all ingredients together. Pour over the pudding the second it comes out of the oven - pouring from the middle to the outside.

Works well hot or cold :)

lupo pazzesco
12-19-2011, 10:41 AM
heat lysis* of salmonella strains does not occur at any temperature under 165 degrees Fahrenheit. Heating salmonella to between 80-100 will cause the cellular metabolism to increase and they will flourish, not die. We incubate salmonella to grow it in the lab at 37C or 98.6F, yes the optimal temperature for salmonella to flourish is human body temperature, it's a fascinating bacterial strain, from a scientific standpoint.

I use a candy thermometer, and stir constantly until it gets close to 170, but stays liquid, and then strain it off to maintain the velvety liquid texture (and to strain out the cinnamon sticks and cloves, but that's beside the point :p)

Yeah, salmonella is a tenacious 'lil strain, from what I remember from microbiology lab. Kind of scary, because I think freezing cookie dough is a common food myth (I used to believe it myself) to make it "safe" to eat raw, but really, it does nothing, since salmonella can survive that, if I'm remembering right.

BlaqueKatt
12-22-2011, 11:57 PM
Kind of scary, because I think freezing cookie dough is a common food myth (I used to believe it myself) to make it "safe" to eat raw, but really, it does nothing, since salmonella can survive that, if I'm remembering right.

yup, most bacteria can, once we have a "stock" growth* we freeze it, it lives but is very inactive.


*stock growth is used for quality control, we have to test all media to ensure the stuff it's supposed to grow, grows on or in it.