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dalesys
01-28-2012, 02:10 PM
Non lysdexic people who use diffuse when they mean defuse.

De-Fuse: To remove the triggering mechanism from a bomb or explosive situation so it doesn't go BOOM!:rant:

Dif-Fuse: To spread out. As one of my daughter's students (7th grade) said: "So is that why when I fart, at first only I can smell it, then the people near me, and then the whole room?":fart:

BookstoreEscapee
01-28-2012, 06:55 PM
People who say "tenant" when they mean "tenet"...I see it a lot in religious discussions. Your religion doesn't have tenants, unless it owns rental property. I just saw this one used today (in a different context) and they didn't even spell tenant correctly. :headdesk:

fireheart
01-28-2012, 10:22 PM
One I see ALL the time online:

People who say "your" when they mean "you're" or "there" when they mean "their".

It's sad though that when I call people out on it, they chide me for being the "spelling police".

firecat88
01-28-2012, 11:14 PM
1) People who use the word 'literally' when they mean 'figuratively'.

2) Improper is/are and was/were usage. This one drives me even crazier than the first one.

Food Lady
01-28-2012, 11:40 PM
Would of: It's supposed to be would've, which is a contraction for would have. My others have been named already.

MoonCat
01-28-2012, 11:57 PM
Bare = naked or uncovered
Bear = as a verb, means to carry or hold; as a noun, the animal
Loose = opposite of tight
Lose = opposite of win
too = also (not spelled "to")
discrete = separate
discreet = with restraint

And the your/you're thing drives me nuts, too.

No one uses "comprise" correctly, either. Something is not "comprised of," it just "comprises". I see this in news stories all the time; you'd think professional journalists would know better.

I generally don't bother pointing these out online as long as I can tell what the person meant. But some of those letters on PFB or M3C are difficult to understand because of all the spelling and grammar errors.

flybye023
01-29-2012, 12:00 AM
mute/moot

You mute the sound on TV
Your point is moot if the underlying argument no longer exists. (the dictionary said "obsolete")

bear/bare
Bare is to uncover
Bear has many different meanings depending on context but does not mean bare.

dalesys
01-29-2012, 12:05 AM
Let's go bare hunting.:eyewaggle:

Cookie
01-29-2012, 01:20 AM
My peeve is people who correct everyone else's grammar while spelling it "grammer". :doh:

chikenlady
01-29-2012, 02:05 AM
Using more with superlative adjectives ( more bigger)

blas
01-29-2012, 02:11 AM
I HATE would of could of should of.

Seriously, people at work think I'm boobs for brains, yet I at least can say it and write it correctly. These geniuses also think that when you say "Go get 'em", it's spelled "Um".

Every time I get a text from this person, asking me if I've "cooked um" yet, I just want to kill them, or that they "could of" gone home.

It's more important to me that they can't even get it right. Um is a substitute filler word for when you are drawing a blank, or some people are just addicted to "um". 'Em is a cut off word short for "them".

I never said I was smart. I said they say I'm boobs for brains. But at least I have a few up on them. Namely, I don't text people "Your really getting on my nerves, I should of went home earlier!"

Irving Patrick Freleigh
01-29-2012, 02:36 AM
Overuse of the word "literally." Every time I hear this, I think "your parents should literally have their privates ripped off just for bringing you into this world."

Here's some pretty (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/misspelling) pictures (http://theoatmeal.com/comics/semicolon) for y'all. I take pride in being one of those people who has his shit together when it comes to semicolons.

Jester
01-29-2012, 02:52 AM
"Axe" instead of "ask." This is used by either uneducated people, or people trying to act more badass than they actually are (such as white suburban kids trying to be "ghetto").

There is a huge difference between "ask" and "axe" as words, and we are not simply talking about regional dialect here.

THEM: "Let me ask you something."
ME: "Sure!"

THEM: "Let me axe you--"
ME: "AAAAAAAHHHHHHHH!!!! RUN FOR YOUR LIVES! CALL THE POLICE! HELP!" :runaway:

An inquisitive person ASKS.
A psycho killer AXES.

I take pride in being one of those people who has his shit together when it comes to semicolons.

My father actually wrote a letter to the editor of our local newspaper in the late Seventies lamenting the fact that the semi-colon was becoming endangered. And yes, they printed it, too! I'll see if I can have my Mom dig it up for me....

antlan87
01-29-2012, 02:54 AM
I take issue to people who seem to think teh is a proper word. I also hate text speech, such as C U l8r. I partially blame my Philosophy and Religions (two different classes) teacher, as he was an English teacher, so correct spelling and grammar was a must on final copies of essays. Made reading my English translated copy of Romance of the Three Kingdoms a nightmare. I swear they had 20 different errors for "the" in it, among many other errors. As a reprint, you would think they would correct the errors this time, they had 50 years to find them. Avoid the C.H. Brewitt-Taylor translation.

BrenDAnn
01-29-2012, 03:24 AM
They're/there/their has been covered...your/you're is also a big one for me. Another is when someone says they "could care less" when they actually mean that they "COULDN'T care less" about something. There IS a difference, people. Learn it. Oh, and unnecessary apostrophes annoy the fuck out of me! Example: Banana's for sale! or I like bike's! Gah...stop doing that! Also seen/saw. Don't tell me that you "seen" a movie last night. You SAW a movie, fucktard. While we're on the subject, here's a fun and useful linky for you all: Common Errors In English Usage (http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html). I keep it bookmarked, as it's a great reference for my writing.

ETA: I thought of another one. "Supposeably"...Is. Not. A word! The word is supposedly. I grit my teeth and fight telling whoever says that non-word off every time I hear it.

blas
01-29-2012, 03:36 AM
There's some words (midwesterners will get it) that I don't think people realize are wrong, they just grew up hearing them and will always say them.

Supposeably, like Brenn noted, is one of them. Taters is another. Crick is another. We've just been upriver stupid for too long :)

BrenDAnn
01-29-2012, 03:49 AM
Too true, blas. A couple of others are warsh and ambliance (ambulance). Upriver stupid made me laugh, by the way. :lol:

blas
01-29-2012, 04:16 AM
It's ambuhlance around here :)

Jester
01-29-2012, 04:19 AM
Crick is another.
Obviously crick is not a body of water smaller than a stream, but I have no problem with people who, due to their regional accent, PRONOUNCE the word creek as crick, as long as they WRITE it correctly. Hell, being a Westerner, I drop a lot of g's off the ends of my words when speaking, but I don't do it so much when typin', if y'all are gettin' my meanin'.


AND, I forgot my number one grammar peeve: my MOTHER.

Seriously.

It's because of her that whenever I hear someone speaking incorrectly, I feel a compulsive urge to correct them. Why? Because I hear my mother's voice IN MY HEAD, telling me the CORRECT way. Whether it's me or someone else doing it, my mom's voice is ALWAYS THERE!

Damn it, Mom--stop that!

(My revenge is sweet and simple, happens frequently, and goes something like this:
ME: "So me and Little Red were hanging out at the bar--"
MOM: "Little Red and *I*."
ME: "No, you weren't there. I would have remembered."
MOM: "..."

Food Lady
01-29-2012, 05:22 AM
Hee hee--nice pwnage on your mom, Jester. :lol: Also, irregardless is not a word. The word is regardless. Irregardless would mean without without regard--a double negative.

BlaqueKatt
01-29-2012, 09:58 PM
While we're on the subject, here's a fun and useful linky for you all: Common Errors In English Usage (http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html).

sharing with my "grammar nazis" FB group.....

Eireann
01-29-2012, 10:12 PM
Improper use of apostrophes. My freshman English teacher in high school taught me many valuable things, such as the fact that the apostrophe TAKES THE PLACE of the missing letter in a word. Hence, "could not" becomes "couldn't". The apostrophe takes the place of the "o".

When someone refers to a time period - say, the 1920s - the apostrophe is NOT used, because no letters are missing. You wouldn't write "the nineteen-twentie's". It's "the 1920s", "the 1930s", etc. Or, to shorten it, you would write, "the '20s", or "the '30s". Again, the apostrophe takes the place of the missing text (in this case, numbers rather than letters). Plural nouns do not use an apostrophe.

He also taught us that when in doubt as to which personal pronoun to use when speaking of yourself and another person or a group of people, think of the form you would use if speaking only of yourself. Thus, "he and I went to the store", or "she and I saw a movie."

MoonCat
01-29-2012, 10:20 PM
ETA: I thought of another one. "Supposeably"...Is. Not. A word! The word is supposedly. I grit my teeth and fight telling whoever says that non-word off every time I hear it.

Oh God, THIS ONE. My co-worker "Wilma" uses this all the time. This woman has a degree! What's really weird is that she writes "supposedly" but always, always SAYS "supposeably." I don't get it.

And forget trying to convince anyone that "weird" is the correct spelling. It doesn't fit the "I before E" rule so people insist that "wierd" is correct.

Oh..here's another. People who believe they must use a capital letter on words like black, blue, green, etc.; or with things like oak, cherry, pine, etc. "Black" is only capped when referring to people and even then, I don't think it's considered proper all the time. I once told a co-worker that things like "blue" or "oak" don't get capped because they are not proper nouns, such as names. His response: "Blue is the name of the color." I gave up at that point. :rolleyes:

Jester
01-29-2012, 10:22 PM
Hee hee--nice pwnage on your mom, Jester.

Not really pwnage so much as bad grammar drives her NUTS, so whenever I do that (which is all the time....one of my worst grammatical habits, to be honest), she can't help herself but to comment. And I, of course, can't help myself but to poke fun at her. This has only been going on for, oh, the last 30 years or so.

SongsOfDragons
01-30-2012, 02:24 PM
Everything thus far mentioned in this thread, plus a couple more...

Affect and effect. "The effect of the rollercoaster affected my stomach." Small peeve, it's tricky, but the whole sentence screws up if the vowel at the beginning is wrong...

Faze and phase. "I was not fazed by Kitty phasing through the wall." GAH THIS ONE. I know it looks like a silly word but faze is real!! Though I believe a well-known American author - Twain IIRC, I might be wrong - got it wrong too, so they're in good company...

BrenDAnn
01-30-2012, 03:28 PM
Ha you're welcome BlaqueKatt! Hope your FB group enjoys that. :D Mooncat, sorry you have to deal with "Wilma". Eireann I am so glad to see that at least ONE professor taught the proper use of the apostrophe! If only more people understood it!

MaggieTheCat
01-30-2012, 04:46 PM
When "that" is used to refer to a person instead of "who."

Jane is the one WHO used the blue pencil. I'm the one WHO made that pie. A lot of people like to use "that" in place of "who" in those instances.

Also, people who (see what I did there? not "people that...") think that when referring to yourself and another person, you ALWAYS use "and I." Not true in every situation. To know whether to use "I" or "me", take out the other person's name and see how it sounds:

Jane and I are going to go to the store. That's correct, because if you took out Jane, you'd say "I am going to go to the store."

Would you like to come to the store with Jane and me? That's correct, because if you took out Jane, you'd have, "Would you like to come to the store with me?" You would not say, "Would you like to come to the store with I?"

Eireann
01-30-2012, 08:51 PM
"Sherbert" instead of the proper word, sherbet.

Bet bet bet bet bet. NOT bert. Bet. Sure, Burt. No.

Sherbet. Sherbet. Sherbet.

Probably. NOT "prolly". Probably.

Presumably, NOT "presumedly".

Then there's the improper use of the adverb "hopefully". You do something hopefully - look at another person, for example. Yet almost everyone says, for example, "Hopefully, this will happen." What? Where's the verb? This will happen [verb] hopefully?

MoonCat
01-31-2012, 01:47 AM
"Sherbert" instead of the proper word, sherbet.

Bet bet bet bet bet. NOT bert. Bet. Sure, Burt. No.

Sherbet. Sherbet. Sherbet.

YES. YES. YES.

Our friends had a beautiful orange/white cat named....Bert. Short for....Sherbert. Arrgh.

Oh here's one...How do you pronounce the word "mauve"?

It rhymes with "cove." Most people say "mawve". Makes me grit my teeth when I get customers saying that. :D

chikenlady
01-31-2012, 01:56 AM
Another misuse I detest is the wrong use of ground/floor and roof/ceiling.
The ground is outside and the roof is on the outside of the house.

Severen13
01-31-2012, 02:20 AM
your/you're
lose/loose
there/their/they're
principle/principal

I cannot believe how many people do not know how to use those words correctly.

And "a lot" is two words!

Food Lady
01-31-2012, 02:35 AM
All of the above.

Sapphire Silk
01-31-2012, 02:37 AM
Improper use of apostrophes.

In addition to your examples, the apostrophe also indicates possession and can be used with either the singular or the plural form.

Panacea's= belongs to Panacea.

Panaceas= more than one Panacea [plural form of Panacea]

Panaceas'= belongs to more than one Panacea or to a group of Panaceas.

Strunk and White's Elements of Style was required reading for me in my BA program in History. I still own my copy; it is the best book on writing I have ever read.

ArcticChicken
01-31-2012, 02:56 AM
1) People who use the word 'literally' when they mean 'figuratively'.

I used to think that 'literally' meant 'figuratively' because I'd only heard it misused.

telecom_goddess
01-31-2012, 06:04 PM
I hate all of the above listed...lose/loose being my number one hate. I'm soooo sick of people saying "I don't want to loose that thing".....GAHHHHHH. I also hate when people don't call things by their correct names...taters being an example.

But another one I hate that I see/hear all the time ...in JOURNALISM! is when they say "this movie/book/whatever is entitled blah blah blah" The correct usage, which I learned in journalism class, is "this movie is titled blah" Entitled means something completely different, as in entitlement whore :lol::lol:

Chanlin
01-31-2012, 07:18 PM
"Sherbert" instead of the proper word, sherbet.

Bet bet bet bet bet. NOT bert. Bet. Sure, Burt. No.

Sherbet. Sherbet. Sherbet.


I'd be willing to bet the mispronunciation came first (though I've never found any etymological evidence of it) since the word was originally Arabic before it entered English. It shares the same roots with words like Syrup and Shrub (which all com from Arabic) and are all types of drinks. Since it is rare for English to not repeat consonant sounds the insert happens since our brains just want to put it in there even though it's not there.

Interestingly enough the OED and many many other dictionaries list the -bert ending as an acceptable alternative spelling.

Food Lady
01-31-2012, 07:23 PM
I hate all of the above listed...lose/loose being my number one hate. I'm soooo sick of people saying "I don't want to loose that thing".....GAHHHHHH. I also hate when people don't call things by their correct names...taters being an example. But another one I hate that I see/hear all the time ...in JOURNALISM! is when they say "this movie/book/whatever is entitled blah blah blah" The correct usage, which I learned in journalism class, is "this movie is titled blah" Entitled means something completely different, as in entitlement whore :lol::lol: The lose/loose thing drives me nuts. And as for entitled books: maybe they want to be put on a higher shelf than all the other books?

Lady Legira
01-31-2012, 08:40 PM
Mine comes from WoW - when you are looking to build a group, you are looking for a Rogue not a Rouge. I'm sure you would look lovely in blusher but it won't help you take down that boss.

Eireann
01-31-2012, 08:45 PM
Much to my surprise, it is "just deserts", NOT "just desserts". In other words, you are getting what you deserve. I discovered that one a few years ago, and just happened to think of it now.

protege
02-01-2012, 01:38 AM
Around here, we have the tools who insist on ending every sentence with "you know what I'm sayin'?" No asshole, I *don't* know what you're saying. You sound like you have marbles in your mouth. Oh, and quit calling the city "Picksburg" while you're at it. Mainly, because the city's name is "Pittsburgh." Do you see a fucking C or K in it?

What can I say...other than I went to a Catholic grade school, and proper spelling and speech was drilled into us.

telecom_goddess
02-01-2012, 02:49 AM
The lose/loose thing drives me nuts. And as for entitled books: maybe they want to be put on a higher shelf than all the other books?

:lol::lol: I hadn't thought of that!

Speaking of pronunciations it drives me crazy when someone calls a picture a "pitcher". Yes there are pitchers to hold liquids...but pictures are what go in frames, on the wall etc.

Or when jewelry gets pronounced "joolery" or nuclear is pronounced "nukular"

paxillated
02-01-2012, 04:13 AM
To slow or stop a car, one steps on the brakes, not the "breaks." If I was "breaking hard" during an accident, it would mean multiple fractures!

Those who... overuse... ellipses... or... substitute them... for punctuation...

Someone has already mentioned the delightful "Nome-zayn?"

"Seriously" and "really" used as expletives. I'd rather hear the f-bomb. (see below)

The overuse of the f-bomb. (I include myself, here.) It shows such a lack of creativity, and such a lack of class. We can do better. DIAF has a lot more punch than FOAD.

If you can't be bothered to use capitalization or punctuation when you write, please please please please (you should be picturing the Godfather of Soul*) double space between your sentences. That way the rest of us have some chance of understanding it.

*[URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgyotG1mtN4"]

Jester
02-01-2012, 03:14 PM
Our friends had a beautiful orange/white cat named....Bert. Short for....Sherbert. Arrgh.

To be fair, when it comes to NAMES, there is no correct or incorrect, as you can name something or someone whatever the hell you want to. Which is why two of my nieces have very novel spellings of their names.

That being said, it was only very recently (a few years ago) that I realized that the ice cream-like dessert in question was NOT spelled with two r's. This despite my very first job, at the age of 16, being in an ice cream parlor, where we sold loads of sherbet.

You'd think I might have noticed....

Much to my surprise, it is "just deserts", NOT "just desserts". In other words, you are getting what you deserve. I discovered that one a few years ago, and just happened to think of it now.

Are you sure about this? Because honestly, that makes no sense. "Just deserts" with only one s would be pronounced differently, and would make it sound like you were talking about an arid climate (as in where I'm from), rather than the way we all pronounce it, as in a tasty dish following a meal.

I don't get it.

The overuse of the f-bomb.

FUCK AN A!

Sorry, couldn't resist! :lol:

MaggieTheCat
02-01-2012, 03:30 PM
Are you sure about this? Because honestly, that makes no sense. "Just deserts" with only one s would be pronounced differently, and would make it sound like you were talking about an arid climate (as in where I'm from), rather than the way we all pronounce it, as in a tasty dish following a meal.

I don't get it.


I was curious about this too, so I did a little research. Turns out "desert" has multiple meanings; it can mean an arid climate, as you were describing, but it can also mean "deserving." Thus, "Just Deserts" means "justly deserving (a reward or punishment)" or, in other words, a reward or punishment that someone deserves based on their actions. When used in this context, "deserts" is pronounced the same as "desserts."

strawbabies
02-01-2012, 11:02 PM
I worked with a woman who didn't know the difference between "when" and "whenever." For example, she'd say something like, "Whenever I was born..." Really? You were born more than once?

Irving Patrick Freleigh
02-01-2012, 11:06 PM
Around here, we have the tools who insist on ending every sentence with "you know what I'm sayin'?" No asshole, I *don't* know what you're saying. You sound like you have marbles in your mouth. Oh, and quit calling the city "Picksburg" while you're at it. Mainly, because the city's name is "Pittsburgh." Do you see a fucking C or K in it?


Hmmm. I thought one would be far more likely to mis-pronounce it "Pissburgh." :angel:

Eireann
02-01-2012, 11:19 PM
Maggie got there ahead of me - yes, it is as she said. "Desert", in this context, is pronounced as "deserve", only without the final "ve".

Oh, and one that I just HATE:

"I'm, like, ..."

This is only appropriate when you are comparing yourself to someone or something else.

BookstoreEscapee
02-02-2012, 12:15 AM
Was just skimming the last 5 pages so I don't know if anyone's mentioned this: People who use "whom" because they clearly think it makes them sound smart...they almost invariably use it wrong.

MoonCat
02-02-2012, 01:43 AM
Using the word "repeat" with the word "again." As in, "please repeat that again." Arrghhh.....

If you repeat something, you are by definition saying it again.

Also, I hate when people say "3 AM in the morning...." Well, DUH, there's no 3 AM in the afternoon or the evening, is there??

MaggieTheCat
02-02-2012, 01:58 AM
Oh, and one that I just HATE:

"I'm, like, ..."

This is only appropriate when you are comparing yourself to someone or something else.

I will admit to being guilty of this. :o I probably use "like" way more than is appropriate when I'm actually speaking. I don't think it's quite valley-girl level, but it's probably still inappropriate.

ArcticChicken
02-02-2012, 03:50 AM
"PIN number" hate hate hate hate hate

firecat88
02-02-2012, 04:52 AM
Was just skimming the last 5 pages so I don't know if anyone's mentioned this: People who use "whom" because they clearly think it makes them sound smart...they almost invariably use it wrong.

Don't forget the people who use 'wherefore' to try to sound smart, but ultimately end up using it wrong. I've seen it happen, and it's annoying. For the last fracking time, people, wherefore =/= where.

BrenDAnn
02-02-2012, 05:40 AM
"PIN number" hate hate hate hate hate
On a related and equally aggravating note: ATM machine. Why? Automatic teller machine machine? It doesn't make sense!

Don't forget the people who use 'wherefore' to try to sound smart, but ultimately end up using it wrong. I've seen it happen, and it's annoying. For the last fracking time, people, wherefore =/= where.

You're right. Wherefore actually means why, if I recall my Shakespearean language correctly. When Juliet said, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" she was not asking where he was. She was lamenting over WHY he had to be a Montague. She was lamenting the fact that he was from the one family that her family hated more than any other. So yeas, firecat88, I agree with you. Whoever uses wherefore as where needs to stop. Now.

Eireann
02-02-2012, 11:12 AM
"I have a friend of mine..."

Oh, really? You don't have a friend who really belongs to someone else?

And MoonCat, the song "Moonlight Shadow" commits that error. "4 a.m. in the morning..." I want to write to Mike Oldfield and point it out, but I'm sure many other people have done it already.

Ree
02-02-2012, 11:17 AM
Also, people who (see what I did there? not "people that...") think that when referring to yourself and another person, you ALWAYS use "and I." Not true in every situation. To know whether to use "I" or "me", take out the other person's name and see how it sounds:

Jane and I are going to go to the store. That's correct, because if you took out Jane, you'd say "I am going to go to the store."Along with that one, misuse of the words "myself" and "yourself".

There is nothing wrong with saying "me" and "you".

I don't know where this trend started, but it's really out of hand. When someone uses a "self" pronoun where a simple pronoun is called for, it is almost always because he mistakenly thinks the reflexive form sounds more intelligent or classy. It doesn't.

I hear interviews on TV with supposedly intelligent people and they will say something like, "...between the committee and myself..." instead of just saying, "...between the committee and me..."

My boss uses it all the time.
"If you have any questions about this new sales promo, see Mary or myself."
"I have cut back the schedule so that the only people here to close will be John and yourself."

He wouldn't say, "See myself about this," or "Yourself will be closing."

I will hear someone ask, "How are you?" and the answer will be, "I'm fine, and yourself?"
You wouldn't ask, "How are yourself?" which is pretty much what the person is asking in reply.

"Myself" is a reflexive pronoun, as are "himself", "herself", "yourself", "itself", "ourselves", and "themselves".
That means it is used when the subject and object of the sentence are the same.

"I prefer coffee, myself."
"I did it for myself."

Cookie
02-02-2012, 05:52 PM
Just thought of another one. The use of "There's" when it should be "There are" because what you're dealing with it plural.

Examples:

There's some oranges. = wrong
There are some oranges. = right

You wouldn't say "There is some oranges."

Food Lady
02-02-2012, 07:14 PM
You wouldn't say, "There is some oranges." Some people would.... :p

Ree
02-02-2012, 07:24 PM
Some people would.... :p:spew:
I laughed right out loud at that.
It struck me as funny. (I work with people who say that, actually.)

Food Lady
02-02-2012, 07:44 PM
Hee--that was the point of it. :D

FormerCallingCardRep
02-02-2012, 07:49 PM
One I hear a lot and gets to me all the time is MSDS Sheets.

firecat88
02-02-2012, 09:06 PM
One I hear a lot and gets to me all the time is MSDS Sheets.

That reminds me of CSS sheets. Lost count of how many times I heard that in class today.

Ree
02-02-2012, 09:17 PM
I get "RGA authorization" which means "Return Goods Authorization authorization."

Another work related one that bugs me. They spell "throw" or "threw" as "through".

I am often asked to claim a leaky bottle of something or broken glass that has been disposed of, and I am told they "through it out", or if something has to be saved for a sales rep to look at for credit, the note says, "Do not through out."

Cookie
02-02-2012, 10:26 PM
Some people would.... :p

:lol: Ok, yeah. I knew better. I would like to THINK people wouldn't say that. Leave my fantasy world alone! I'm having tea with the tooth fairy!

MoonCat
02-02-2012, 11:33 PM
Oh, let's not forget, "So I thought to myself..."

If you can think to someone else, you are telepathic.

Food Lady
02-03-2012, 03:29 AM
My friend just did this one: isle/aisle. She posted on facebook that she was in the grocery isle. Really? Is Gilligan there, too?

sms001
02-03-2012, 09:35 AM
All of the above!

Jester, you're not alone in hearing Mom's voice urging you to correct misuse. Mine continues to do it from beyond the grave.

One of my favorite gentle corrections (which I DO try to not give in to too often) is to exaggerate the offense. If someone says "I seen him go by with his friend." I'll say "I think you mean 'I seended him go by...' there Bill."

Having said that, I really am of mixed feelings on correcting. On the one hand, I realize that misuse of one's native language is often seen as an indicator of laziness or poor education.
On the other hand, one of the wonderful things about English is its incredible flexibility. We all often look to Shakespeare as a role model for writing, but he made stuff up all the friggin' time. :) Why shouldn't the language continue to evolve? My favorite example of this is "guys." In fifty to a hundred years, I have no doubt that almost no one will have a clue that it started as a gender specific word. The number of women I see who object to being referred to as one has declined steadily over the years.
On the gripping hand, I really think radio and television announcers (journalists, presenters, etc.) should be held to a higher standard than others, just so we have some sort of baseline to look toward. The U.S., at least, is so large that regionalisms could easily let us branch further and further from being mutually understood.

I saw literally mentioned a few times, but my biggest pet peeve lately is the modification of unique. Even the supposed "pros" do it often. I don't think it's just me though, as it was a Jeopardy answer within the last two weeks or so.

Thanks for the "just deserts" lesson folks. I didn't know, or even suspect, that one. I think I always assumed it was something along the lines of just=fair + desserts=substitute for reward. :lol:

There's a local radio ad that goes above and beyond "ATM machine" and "PIN number" for redundancy. In it they refer to "custom LASIK laser eye surgery." Leaving aside the fact that every human is unique, and therefore the surgery would HAVE to be "custom", LASER and EYE (because where else would the cornea on which you're performing keratomileusis be?) are built right into the damn acronym!

dalesys
02-03-2012, 02:20 PM
You wouldn't say "There is some oranges."
"There is some melons!" is normal, though.:devil:

MoonCat
02-04-2012, 02:18 AM
This one makes me cringe: "Spaded" instead of "spayed." Arrgh...

Ree
02-04-2012, 02:33 AM
Not really a grammar peeve, but I thought it was funny.

I found a note on one of the returns on my desk saying that the "customer was not sadisfided'. :lol:

fireheart
02-04-2012, 07:11 AM
One of the things I may or may not encourage with a teaching placement is the idea of an "Oops board". The idea is that students would be encouraged to bring in newspaper articles, catalogues, fliers, notices, photos of notices etc. where there's a spelling or grammar bungle and put them up on said "Oops Board."

MoonCat
02-04-2012, 11:30 PM
One of the things I may or may not encourage with a teaching placement is the idea of an "Oops board". The idea is that students would be encouraged to bring in newspaper articles, catalogues, fliers, notices, photos of notices etc. where there's a spelling or grammar bungle and put them up on said "Oops Board."

That would be fun. One of our smaller local supermarkets had a pic of dandelion greens in its flyer, labeled, "Dendelods." How they managed to spell it THAT wrong is beyond me.

BrenDAnn
02-05-2012, 08:39 PM
Not really a grammar peeve, but I thought it was funny.

I found a note on one of the returns on my desk saying that the "customer was not sadisfided'. :lol:

How long did it take you to stop laughing? Oh lord...One a co-worker of mine does, since we're on the subject is "We ain't got no <Xitem>" or "We don't have no <X item>!" Double negatives like that drive me insane! Have we forgotten the word 'any'?

fireheart
02-06-2012, 02:20 AM
That would be fun.

That's what I thought. It'd put their English skills into practice and also prove that you can't rely on spellcheck.
The only thing I'd have to take into consideration though is whether to allow "Engrish" things to go up on the board.

By the way, a little website to interest you all: www.engrish.com

:lol:

Ree
02-07-2012, 03:35 AM
Was just listening to the news a moment ago where they reported on a very bad accident.

The reporter said, "Out of 11 deaths, there were only 3 survivors." :eek::confused::lol:

I'm thinking they need to think that one out again.

BrenDAnn
02-07-2012, 03:52 AM
Or three turned into Zombies or Vampires. I know, it's horrible to joke like that, but when stupidity lends itself to it...

Mytical
02-07-2012, 09:35 PM
*laughs* I must have many people on here picturing me being pulled apart by horses...my grammar is atrocious, as is my spelling. While my vocabulary is actually extensive, English (the school class) was always the subject I struggled with. Love reading, love writing, but I know that I struggle with grammar and spelling.

dalesys
02-07-2012, 10:10 PM
Mytical, as I started the original post with, and is hopefully true of most of us, we accept that a significant (and appreciated) minority strugle with the grammar and spelling of the "Angluish" language. My beef is with capable people falsely claiming to be handicapped.

With my love of transobliterating concepts I enjoy the frameshifts given by the dyslexic members of the communities I interact with. And in any sustained interaction, it becomes reasonably clear roughly where a person is on the continuum between a person who is unable to and one who refuses to.:highfive:

Ree
02-07-2012, 10:22 PM
There's a huge difference between someone making a post on a message board and a professional, either in the workplace or the media, who makes these types of errors.

I totally understand that some people do have dyslexia or other learning challenges, and I'm not looking for perfection.

I just want to be able to read a post and understand it.

I downloaded a spellchecker for my browser, and before I post, I look for all the red squiggly lines and right click to correct them.

I don't always catch them all, so I would be the last person to point the finger at someone's spelling or grammar errors.

(I do laugh at people who complain about other people's errors, though, when their own posts are filled with major errors.)

taurinejunkie
02-07-2012, 10:50 PM
I've noticed and become annoyed at one of my coworkers making a recurrent mistake. In her defence (defense?), English is her second language; I may also be the one making a mistake.

When she explains the service to a new user, she always says, "Please address yourself directly to the customer" where she should, I believe, say something like "Please address the customer directly"** because of how the verb "address" works in English vs. in French. And, possibly because she has a good quarter of a century on me, she refuses to even consider the possibility that she's wrong. Iny my opinion, she makes the company look bad (or simply, not as good as it could) to our anglophone hearing users.

** Please correct me if I'm wrong.

MoonCat
02-08-2012, 12:29 AM
Well, according to thefreedictionary.com, it is correct to say "address yourself to", but she could use your phrase, "address the customer directly," too. They both say the same thing.

BookstoreEscapee
02-08-2012, 12:36 AM
One of the things I may or may not encourage with a teaching placement is the idea of an "Oops board". The idea is that students would be encouraged to bring in newspaper articles, catalogues, fliers, notices, photos of notices etc. where there's a spelling or grammar bungle and put them up on said "Oops Board."

I think that's a great idea!

I will admit to saying "me and Colleen" when talking about my best friend...but I only say it to my mom because it drives her crazy. I did it as a kid and she would correct me so I started doing it on purpose. :devil:

Food Lady
02-08-2012, 02:04 AM
I heard one at work today: "I seen it at [forget what store she mentioned]...." It's either "I saw" or "I've seen". That error is sooooo common here.

Iris Kojiro
02-10-2012, 07:42 AM
YES. YES. YES.

Our friends had a beautiful orange/white cat named....Bert. Short for....Sherbert. Arrgh.

Oh here's one...How do you pronounce the word "mauve"?

It rhymes with "cove." Most people say "mawve". Makes me grit my teeth when I get customers saying that. :D

I've made those two mistakes my whole life, but... (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pele5vptVgc)

HappyFun Ball
02-10-2012, 08:02 AM
I'll admit I make a lot of grammar mistakes, I didn't do well in English.

My peeves:

I've got some meat unthawing (You mean you are freezing/refreezing it?) If you are defrosting meat you are thawing it.

"For all intensive purposes."

MoonCat
02-11-2012, 03:33 AM
"One in the same" - It's one and the same.
"Irregardless" - there's no such word. It's just "regardless."
Oh and my favorite one to hate. "I really miss not going there." No - you miss going there. Or whatever phrase..."I miss not doing that" or something similar...

Chazzie
02-11-2012, 08:37 PM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned this already, but I have a serious issue with "than"/"then" swaps. I know a certain CS poster that drives me nuts with this one :lol:

Oh, and when customers say they NEED something when really, they only WANT it. You don't NEED a donut, people!

MoonCat
02-12-2012, 01:16 AM
Oh, and when customers say they NEED something when really, they only WANT it. You don't NEED a donut, people!

Well, that's debatable. :p

Merriweather
02-12-2012, 10:48 AM
Context is everything. While I wouldn't think twice about spelling or grammar errors in a casual email from a friend, errors in the newspaper drive me up a wall. I definitely don't always speak perfectly, and I do take a few liberties with the English language in quick emails to someone close. However, I would take great pains to be as near perfect as I could on a resume or company report.

I admit I'm far from perfect, and have dangled many a participle with no shame whatsoever, not to mention splitting infinitives with abandon.
It's those errors that wouldn't have made it past a sixth grade teacher that feel like fingernails on a chalkboard to me.

I definitely have a few personal pet peeves that have me searching for the largest most compehensive grammar book I can find - in order to use it as a weapon :devil: Some have already been mentioned.


unnecessary apostrophes annoy the fuck out of me!

Couldn't have said it better myself. Why is it, no one can use an "S" to pluralize a word without adding an apostrophe? It's getting to the point I notice more when they actually get it right than when they get it wrong, simply because I so rarely see it used correctly.


Also, people who think that when referring to yourself and another person, you ALWAYS use "and I." Not true in every situation. To know whether to use "I" or "me", take out the other person's name and see how it sounds:


Applause! Yaay. That's such an easy one to figure out, no complicated rules to remember or anything, yet SO many people don't get it.


I'm actually quite tolerant of regional pronunciations - having lived so many places, and seen such a wide variance of what is "correct" depending on where you live. Such as Car Mel (emphasis on Mel, as in Flo's boss at the diner) and Car Mull (emphasis on the car), depending on whether you're in a town of that name (both spelled Carmel) in California or Indiana.

British place names especially can be pronounced oddly - after you repeat a name for a thousand years or so, it often ends up in a kind of verbal shorthand. Living near Cambridge, it took me a while to catch on that when someone said what sounded like Mawdlin college, they were actually referring to Magdelene college.

As someone posted, talk about wading thru the crick all you want, as long as you know to spell it creek :lol:

Oh, and my all time pet peeve - please be sure that the term you have heard used, but never seen written, is actually what you think it is before posting it for hundreds or thousands of people to read, such as on Craig's List.
My all time favourite example of this was the woman who posted for a garage sale, with directions that included the fact that she lived not on a through street, but on a "cuddle sack". :roll:
Second place goes to the person who posted a real estate ad for an older house, the dining room still had it's original beautiful "Wayne's coating" on the walls.

And to those who struggle but still try, please don't take offence. All comments are aimed at those who either know proper grammar and refuse to use it at all, or those who don't know it, don't want to know it, and yet still expect to be taken as seriously as those who do make an effort.

Eireann
02-12-2012, 11:20 AM
Merriweather, your post reminded me of something I saw on another site. A woman knew the term "faux pas", but didn't know how to spell it; she wrote about a "fo-pa" occurring at an event.

Last year, I read an article online that was deplorable. The apostrophes were misused everywhere; the article lacked many details; the grammar was bad. Yet the "author" (and I use the term VERY loosely) has a job working for a news station. When I pointed out the errors, there were many heated comments opposing mine (from the "author's" friends and family, I suspect). One guy went so far as to say that he didn't read the news for proper grammar and punctuation.

Sad.

SongsOfDragons
02-12-2012, 02:00 PM
British place names especially can be pronounced oddly - after you repeat a name for a thousand years or so, it often ends up in a kind of verbal shorthand. Living near Cambridge, it took me a while to catch on that when someone said what sounded like Mawdlin college, they were actually referring to Magdelene college.



Oh HOLY HELL. This.

We were watching 'Dogs 101' a while back, and it was talking about the Norwich Terrier. Pronouncing it 'Norr-which'.

@.@

AUUUUGH. I couldn't watch it, it sounded DREADFUL. I suppose it's all right, it's just I'm used to the home saying. I posted on FB afterwards, giving the correct pronounciation - 'Norritch'. A Yank friend of mine commented '*has pronounced it wrong his entire life* XP' and a Brit friend commented 'People from Norfolk say it as Narrch, so... :D '

XD It was amusing. I just wonder how some folk pronounce some of the odder names in the UK...we went through Housemate's big book of Cathedrals recently, having a giggle at awful potential pronounciations of some settlements...

sms001
02-12-2012, 05:34 PM
"I was not fazed by Kitty phasing through the wall."

....Pixel!

dalesys
02-12-2012, 06:48 PM
....Pixel!
RAH! RAH! RAH! -- Spider

Cookie
02-12-2012, 06:53 PM
Yeah, I can relate to names being shortened like that. ugh. I grew up near a place called "Shelbyvile", but the locals all called it "Shevville". With a southern accent, it sounds like a lot like "shovel".

Merriweather
02-13-2012, 08:41 PM
Oh HOLY HELL. This.

We were watching 'Dogs 101' a while back, and it was talking about the Norwich Terrier. Pronouncing it 'Norr-which'.

@.@

AUUUUGH. I couldn't watch it, it sounded DREADFUL. I suppose it's all right, it's just I'm used to the home saying. I posted on FB afterwards, giving the correct pronounciation - 'Norritch'. A Yank friend of mine commented '*has pronounced it wrong his entire life* XP' and a Brit friend commented 'People from Norfolk say it as Narrch, so... :D '

XD It was amusing. I just wonder how some folk pronounce some of the odder names in the UK...we went through Housemate's big book of Cathedrals recently, having a giggle at awful potential pronounciations of some settlements...

I tried to make it a point to find out how to pronounce the place names, especially local places. We did get a chuckle out of some American pronunciations, and to be fair, the odd chuckle at a British news anouncer or someone on TV mis-pronouncing American place names as well.

Of course it's impossible to always get it right, so I made many mistakes, and am pretty tolerant of others as well. What did drive me up the wall were some of the people my husband worked with, who had no interest in knowing the correct pronunciation, and even would complain and insist that the local pronunciations were "stupid" :eek: This was in Wales, where local name were, gee, WELSH ! Yet they would argue that they should be pronounced as they would be in English (and American English at that). :confused: After a few conversations where I found myself being less than polite (in fact, I was looking for something heavy to smack them with :devil: ) I finally had to just refuse to be in the same room with a few of them, since my sightseeing plans did not include the inside of a British gaol.:lol:

Eireann
02-13-2012, 08:52 PM
AD does NOT mean "After Death". It stands for "Anno Domini", and it goes before the date, not after. BC goes after the date.

AD 2012, 1500 BC.

The past tense of "sneak" is "sneaked", not "snuck", just as the past tense of "leak" is "leaked", not "luck".