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View Full Version : A Humbling Couple of Weeks....


Jester
01-29-2012, 02:29 AM
...but in the best possible way!

PART ONE: Last week I was featured in a story about the magic shop I work in. Even though I only work there one day a week, that was the day the people with one of the local free papers (that highlights, ironically, Key West's history) showed up, intent on doing a story on said magic shop. Purely by chance, as I had no idea this was going to be happening, I wore very nice clothes...the type I typically wear at the restaurant on Wednesday nights to do magic (business casual), whereas at the magic shop I'll typically just wear shorts and an amusing t-shirt or magic-themed shirt. For whatever reason, that day I decided to just dress once. Which was good luck on my part, as the story did feature a prominent photograph of me doing said magic.

PART TWO: Sunday was the five year anniversary of my first day at The Bar. (There is only one bartender who's been there longer than me, and three front of the house people total, and they all opened the damn place!) I don't work Sundays, but on Monday the GM came up to me and told me he had a present for me. My immediate response was "Uh oh!" figuring it was some extra side project or something. (And I do enough of those, let me tell you.) It wasn't. It was an actual present for my five years of service. So I'm thinking a card or something, nothing major, maybe a little bottle of rum.

Nope.

It was a GORGEOUS framed print, about the size of my tv, depicting the evolution of the Oakland Raiders jerseys over their history. To a lot of people that would be a "so what?" thing. To me, a Raiders diehard fan, this was AWESOME! And it was a good thing I drove to work that day, rather than ride my bike, as there was no way I was getting that thing home on my bike!

PART THREE: Yesterday at work, my boss surprised me yet again, letting me know that The Bar would be sponsoring myself and another of our bartenders for a prestigious mixology course. The course involves several weeks online and then one live seminar in Miami in May. The liquor company sponsoring it pays all but a small amount that the participants pay, but my boss told me that The Bar would be picking that fee up, along with gas money to get there and one night's hotel stay. (I will probably stay two nights and have fun...what the hell, right? I need to talk to the other bartender and see if she wants to commute together and spend the extra night, but she may want to go up separately and do other things, possibly bringing her boyfriend along, etc.)

I should point out that there are hundreds of bars in this town, and so there are a LOT of bartenders...and the liquor company sponsoring this had only allocated ten slots for all of Key West. And our bar got two of them. And one of them was ME.

I know this has a bit to do with my years of service, and my extra work as the Rum Guy at the bar, but I have to think I helped myself just a little bit last Friday. Kind of a dead shift, and the boss man calls on the phone from the upstairs office. Tells me he needs me to come up with a cocktail for each of the three Barbancourt rums we carry.

JESTER: "Sure, no problem. When do you want them by?
BOSS: "I was thinking the end of the shift?"
JESTER: "Say WHAT?" :eek:
BOSS: "End of the weekend? The Barbancourt people are going to be here next week, and I need this done."
JESTER: "Okay...I'll see what I can do."

And I'm thinking to myself, how in the flying fuck am I going to pull this off? I'm not even that big a fan of Barbancourt, as it is Haitian, and I tend to not be a fan of any rums that are made in the French style, as Haitian rum (or more accurately, "rhum") is.

Fifteen minutes later, I knocked on the office door and handed him a slip of paper.

BOSS: "What's this?"
JESTER: "The three drinks you wanted. Hope you like them."
BOSS: :jawdrop:

He emailed the Barbancourt people, and not only did they love the drinks, they loved the names I came up for them:

For the rum Manhattan made with the Barbancourt Reserve 15 year: "Haitian Sensation."
For the rum margarita made with the Barbancourt 5 Star 8 year: "Barb & Rita."
And the consensus favorite, for the tropical cooler type drink made with the Barbancourt Pango, their flavored rum: "Banana Hammock."

Yeah....good start to the year! :cool:

fireheart
01-29-2012, 04:56 AM
Banana Hammock sounds like an American term for budgie-smugglers :lol:

But good call on the drinks and congrats on your very awesome start to the year! :yourock:

Mishi
01-29-2012, 05:52 AM
It's actually QLD one! :roll:

Congrats Jester, I hope your year keeps running along like this.

antlan87
01-29-2012, 12:34 PM
Hope you don't get stuck with the feeling that the highlight of your year is already. That can lessen your enjoyment of future events.

Jester
01-29-2012, 05:12 PM
Banana Hammock sounds like an American term for budgie-smugglers...

I think so...if budgie-smugglers are guys wearing Speedo type bottoms that leave pretty much nothing to the imagination. Which is what banana hammocks are.

Yeah, I hope the year continues along this path as well....now I just have to get in better shape and get a date at some point. Preferably with a female. With a pulse.

Yeah, I'm picky, I know.

fireheart
01-29-2012, 07:45 PM
I think so...if budgie-smugglers are guys wearing Speedo type bottoms that leave pretty much nothing to the imagination. Which is what banana hammocks are.


Down here it can refer to that or just to the briefs themselves.

Down here, it's a lot more common to see them on younger boys because a lot of swim schools do not allow students to wear boardies for swim lessons.

Jester
01-29-2012, 08:01 PM
Swim schools MAKE the kids wear banana hammocks? Oh, that is just SO wrong....I would have drowned first! :lol:

Jester
01-29-2012, 08:04 PM
Back on topic, just remembered something I had forgotten to put in my original post. I did mention that the people from Barbancourt loved the drinks and the drink names, but what I forgot to say was that they also asked if it would be alright if they used those drinks, with those names, credited to me, in other printed promotional material they'd be using, not just in Key West, but elsewhere.

Duh. What do you think I said? Of course! And make sure you spell my name right.... :lol:

Victory Sabre
01-29-2012, 08:15 PM
That is, all, wonderful news.

Now for the girl, well, the pulse is optional.:p

Jester
01-29-2012, 09:02 PM
The pulse is NOT optional. I do have standards, you know.

Amusingly, Barbancourt is NOT the first rum company to use one of my drinks on their promotional material (table tents, etc.). Pyrat was. If you ever see a Pyrat Rum table tent or promotional material listing a drink called the Keys Breeze, it's mine, and it's the drink I created to win my first ever bartending contest about 6 years ago.

Appleton Estate did use some of my creations on table tents a while back, but only within my bar, so I don't really count that.

That being said, Barbancourt is the first rum company to say they'll use THREE of my drinks on promotional material outside of my bar, and the first ever to say they'll attach my name to it as well.

Rum, thy name is Jester. :cheers:
EDITED TO ADD: Damn it! Despite many promises from Pyrat that they would have my Keys Breeze on their website, it is not their....still....all these years later. Worse, a different recipe by me, which is FAR INFERIOR, is there. The drink listed is more of a pain in the ass to make, with less accessible ingredients, and would be ordered by far fewer people. Damn it, Pyrat.....why do you torture me so?

Victory Sabre
01-29-2012, 11:07 PM
Well, it's just like Yuengling beer for me. They have to torture me with their awesomeness, but I can't get it often because I live in Minnesota. Though, I did get some from people who went to Florida for vaca.

You can imagine what I'm doing when I get home from work tonight.

Jester
01-29-2012, 11:25 PM
People are often surprised to see Yuengling down here, and in Florida in general, as it is very prevalent throughout the state. What a lot of them don't realize is that, about 20 years ago, Yuengling took over an old Stroh's brewery in the Tampa area and made it into their second brewery, which explains the Yuengling availability down here, and technically makes Yuengling a local beer for us. :lol:

wolfie
01-31-2012, 03:04 AM
And I'm thinking to myself, how in the flying fuck am I going to pull this off? I'm not even that big a fan of Barbancourt, as it is Haitian, and I tend to not be a fan of any rums that are made in the French style, as Haitian rum (or more accurately, "rhum") is.

Just curious, but what are the differences (both process and results) between rum made in the French style and rum made in the British/Jamaican/Cuban style?

Jester
01-31-2012, 12:40 PM
Oh, wow. That is one large question. And one I don't have time to fully answer at the moment, but I will come back to it tonight or tomorrow.

In other news, found out that one of the other ten Key West bartenders attending the aforementioned mixology class is my buddy Popcorn, which is rather cool. We may just roadtrip up to Miami together, which works for him, since he doesn't have a car. :lol:

dalesys
01-31-2012, 01:16 PM
Just curious, but what are the differences (both process and results) between rum made in the French style and rum made in the British/Jamaican/Cuban style?
Build fire under rotted cane juice. Curse in local language for flavour. Lick condensation off tin roof until it tastes good. Sell to gringos.

MoonCat
02-01-2012, 01:22 AM
Jester, this sounds pretty cool. I think I have to go out and buy some rum, and have a glass in your honor. Maybe that vanilla one you mentioned once before.

Akasa
02-01-2012, 02:37 AM
Banana Hammock cracks me up. I'm glad your year is off to a good start.

Jester
02-01-2012, 02:57 PM
Jester, this sounds pretty cool. I think I have to go out and buy some rum, and have a glass in your honor. Maybe that vanilla one you mentioned once before.

Brinley Gold Vanilla, from St. Kitts. Liquid candy. Greatest flavored rum ever. Accept no imitations. All other vanilla rums are clear...this one is the color of vanilla (dark brown) because it is MADE with real vanilla beans.

Will answer the Spanish/French thing later....my hangover is the size of Haiti right now.

wolfie
02-13-2012, 04:18 AM
Will answer the Spanish/French thing later....my hangover is the size of Haiti right now.

Recovered from your hangover yet? I'm still interested in knowing the differences (method and result) between French-style rum, and British/Jamaican/Cuban style (the latter may be more than one style, but those are the non-French rums I've heard of). Thanks.

Jester
02-13-2012, 05:00 AM
Crap. Forgot about this. But I will get to it....soon. (No, really.)

wolfie
03-11-2012, 10:44 PM
Jester, any updates?

Jester
03-12-2012, 05:00 AM
Nothing major, really. Finally got the literature from the liquor rep, which allowed me to sign in online to the mixology program, and order my package, which my bar paid the difference for, as I said they would. Now just waiting on said package to arrive in the mail so that I can begin the online course.

Current plan, since my buddy Popcorn is also in the program, is to get a hotel room in Miami for two nights, the night before the program and the night of the program. Day before, I will drive up to Miami, and either pick Popcorn up at the airport that night (he is flying in from Jazz Fest in New Orleans) or have him cab it to whatever bar I am at, at which point we will party, though somewhat responsibly, so that we can pay attention at the seminar the following day.

Next day, we shall do the seminar. We plan on smoking it, of course.

After the seminar, we plan on talking about the seminar with each other...over several drinks, as we will be back at the bars again, without any reason to be responsible.

Next day, hangovers in tow, we shall hop in the ever-reliable Jestermobile and return to the Keys.

Not a bad way to spend a Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, huh? :cheers:

Akasa
03-13-2012, 07:57 AM
Sounds like a good time Jester!

wolfie
03-16-2012, 10:09 PM
Any idea when you'll be able to post about the differences between French-style rum and British/Jamaican/Cuban style?

Jester
03-17-2012, 02:55 PM
Ah, crap. I did promise that, didn't I?

Try to hit me up tomorrow for that. Today, as you may have noticed, is a holiday, and to me one of my favorites. But I WILL get that info to you shortly. I promise, damn it!

wolfie
04-01-2012, 04:02 PM
Any updates on the differences between French and other rums?

houdini
04-01-2012, 04:31 PM
Jester, you gotta get onto this. If Wolfie has been taking lessons from Lupo about how to bully, you're in serious trouble.

Jester
04-01-2012, 09:16 PM
Damn it! I knew I was forgetting something....especially since the last time you asked me that, I said I would get right on it that night.

Well, enough procrastinating, damn it.

Ready for a quick lesson? Well, here we go!

Now, dividing rum into meaningful groupings is complicated by the fact that there is no single standard for what constitutes rum. Instead, rum is defined by the varying rules and laws of the nations that produce the spirit. The differences in definitions include issues such as spirit proof, minimum aging, and even naming standards. Basically, just as rum has the most variety of tastes and styles of all the spirits, it also has the most variety of production methods and standards. Hell, it could be argued that the former is due to the latter.

An example of the above is Colombia, where rum is required to possess a minimum alcohol content of 50 ABV (alcohol by volume), while Chilean and Venezuelan rums are only required to be a minimum of 40 ABV. Mexico requires rum to be aged no less than 8 months, the Dominican Republic requires a year, and Venezuela mandates a minimum of 2 years. Naming standards also vary, with Argentina definite rums as White, Gold, Light, and Extra Light. Barbados uses the terms White, Overproof, and Matured, while the good ole U.S. of A. defines the variations as Rum, Rum Liqueur, and Flavored Rum.

Despite the differences in standards and labels, the style of rum production can generally be grouped according to the language that is traditionally spoken in the country of origin, which generally will be Spanish, English, or French.

Spanish-speaking countries traditionally produce light rums with a fairly clean taste. Rums from Cuba and Puerto Rico are typical of this style.

English-speaking nations are known for darker rums with a fuller taste that retain a greater amount of the underlying molasses flavor. Rums from Jamaica and the Demerara region of South American are typical of this style.

French-speaking countries are best known for their agricultural rums (Rhum Agricole). These rums, being produced exclusively from sugar cane juice, retain a greater amount of the original flavor of the sugar cane. Rums from Martinique, Guadeloupe, and Haiti are great examples. Personally, I think the French style rums are generally a bit harsher than the other styles, or as might be more diplomatically put, "more robust." I am not generally a huge fan of the French style, but of course, your individual rum mileage may vary.

As a side note, many countries produce spirits similar to rum. Cachaca, for example, is a spirit similar to rum that is produced in Brazil, and is the base spirit for that country's national drink, the caipirinha. The Indonesian spirit Batavia Arrack, or Arrack, is a spirit similar to rum that includes rice in its production. Aguardiete is produced in Central American and northern South America, and is distilled from molasses infused with anise, with additional sugar cane juice added after distillation. Other than cachaca, though, I have never personally experienced any of these rum-like liquors.

Seraph
04-02-2012, 01:13 AM
Jester, you gotta get onto this. If Wolfie has been taking lessons from Lupo about how to bully, you're in serious trouble.

I can second that, at least Jester managed to avoid it, LMAO.

AccountingDrone
04-02-2012, 08:06 PM
. Damn it, Pyrat.....why do you torture me so?
Because everybody needs a hobby?

In other news, found out that one of the other ten Key West bartenders attending the aforementioned mixology class is my buddy Popcorn, which is rather cool. We may just roadtrip up to Miami together, which works for him, since he doesn't have a car. :lol:

Popcorn is the Tony Bahama Rum mixologist at that other bar?

Jester
04-03-2012, 03:30 AM
Popcorn is the Tony Bahama Rum mixologist at that other bar?

No. Popcorn is the TOMMY Bahama Rumologist at another bar in Key West, the very same friend I promoted and supported for that position many months ago.

tech_monkey
04-03-2012, 07:17 PM
*snip*
Aguardiete is produced in Central American and northern South America, and is distilled from molasses infused with anise, with additional sugar cane juice added after distillation.

Ummmm... brands you might recommend of this...? Please? Availability in the states or linky for online purchase.

I should not be thinking of booze while at work. I really don't :drink: that much.

AccountingDrone
04-03-2012, 08:02 PM
No. Popcorn is the TOMMY Bahama Rumologist at another bar in Key West, the very same friend I promoted and supported for that position many months ago.

My bad ... told you I pretty much didn't drink any more :cry:

Jester
04-04-2012, 03:08 PM
Ummmm... brands you might recommend of this...? Please? Availability in the states or linky for online purchase.

I know absolutely nothing about aguardiente, other than that it exists, is a cousin of rum, and is produced in Central America, as I stated. I am not familiar with any brands, good or bad, and have no idea where any such spirits might be available for purchase in the States, nor for how much, nor how good any are.

Basically, I don't know diddly about aguardiente beyond its existence, so I'm afraid on this item you are going to have to look elsewhere for help.

Treasure
04-04-2012, 08:14 PM
Jester, you gotta get onto this. If Wolfie has been taking lessons from Lupo about how to bully, you're in serious trouble.

Fortunately for Jester, it was wolfie, not xx_wolfie_xx asking; the second one is the one dating Lupo, and then he would've had cause to "shake his pinkie toe in his sock" :D

tech_monkey
04-04-2012, 08:49 PM
I know absolutely nothing about aguardiente, other than that it exists, is a cousin of rum, and is produced in Central America, as I stated. I am not familiar with any brands, good or bad, and have no idea where any such spirits might be available for purchase in the States, nor for how much, nor how good any are.

Basically, I don't know diddly about aguardiente beyond its existence, so I'm afraid on this item you are going to have to look elsewhere for help.

Darn. Thanks anyway.

wolfie
04-06-2012, 06:24 AM
Thanks for the explanation. Bit of trivia - the various flavoured vodkas (pepper, lemon, etc.) couldn't have been sold as such in Napoleonic-era Britain. Why? Because British law at the time classed all flavoured spirits as gin.

Jester
04-06-2012, 07:49 AM
Bit more trivia....for all intents and purposes, gin actually IS just flavored vodka.

Not that really affects me all that much, as I loathe gin, and only drink vodka when it's surrounded by a bloody mary.

Jester
04-22-2012, 11:14 PM
Just finished the online portion of the mixology course, passing all the sections necessary.

Now I just need to learn and commit to memory the 25 classic cocktails they discuss and present, as at the live seminar in Miami, we will be tested on these. As in, we are going to have to make them. And of the few of them that I know, not a one is made in the way I was taught or that I make it.

Should be fun. But as long as I can get those 25 down (and I have both the booklet and the online videos to review to help me with that), Miami should be a blast.

Oh, did I mention that the Miami seminar is next Tuesday, May 1st? Yeah, I have barely a week to learn these cocktails.

Oh, it feels good to be at this point...and yet, I am going to have to study my ass off. And since I have not taken a class that involved this much studying since the early NINETIES, this is going to be amusing. (My magic lessons, by contrast, involved a lot of practice, but not so much studying or memorizing.)

But that is the rest of the week. Today, however, after about 5 hours or so of working my way through the last online section, I am DONE. I am celebrating my completion of this part of things with a lovely beer (reviewed elsewhere on this site), and I am taking the rest of the day OFF.

Beer, food, rum, beer, food, tv, and the net...that is the sum total of the rest of my Sunday, thank you very much.

AccountingDrone
04-23-2012, 12:06 AM
Sounds good, and I have no doubt that you will be able to memorize 25 drinks.:D

dalesys
04-23-2012, 01:32 AM
... the Miami seminar is next Tuesday, May 1st?
Mayday, Jest Robinson! Mayday!:p

Jester
05-10-2012, 04:33 AM
PART THREE: Yesterday at work, my boss surprised me yet again, letting me know that The Bar would be sponsoring myself and another of our bartenders for a prestigious mixology course. The course involves several weeks online and then one live seminar in Miami in May.

NOTE: I tend to ramble on, and this post is no different. So, if you want to skip to the last paragraph to find out the result, knock yourself out. Or, if you prefer, muddle through my random mental musings below as I take you through my experience at the course in Miami.

The online course was tough, but doable. In addition to a workbook, we also had many online videos to watch to help us, and had to take four online tests. All of which I passed, though one I had to take twice (different questions each time, of course). But I wish I had started sooner.

Studying to learn the 25+ "classic" cocktails was tough, and I should have studied more. Especially since, in addition to a written exam and a blind taste test of spirits, we each would receive a practical exam, involving making some of those cocktails.

Once we got to Miami, the lecture portion of the seminar was fun, entertaining, hilariously funny, and informational. Yeah, it went over a lot of the online course stuff, but it was still far different in person, and a far greater experience, especially seeing the passion and love that the lecturers, themselves famous "cocktailians," had for my chosen profession. Also, I was impressed with the turnout, which I guessed to be 70-100 people, who were not just from Florida, but from around the nation, including New York, Indianapolis, etc....people who had flown in just for this course, because, despite my beliefs that this was a regional thing, this course actually only happens a few times a year, in different spots.

During the tasting portion of the lecture (not blind taste test...that would come later with the written exam), we tasted five different spirits, as our hosts walked us through the various tastes, flavors, aromas, textures, and every other sensory input we could get from each one. Just my luck the first two were gin and vodka, one of which I loathe, the other I hate. But I followed instructions, as I was there to learn, and dutifully tasted each, keeping each in my mouth to fully absorb the various complexities and flavors, again, as instructed. Though midway through the vodka portion, I turned to my buddy Popcorn and said, "I'm in hell right now." :lol:

After the lecture, we had a lunch break (they not only fed us lunch, they had fed us breakfast before the lecture, which was split into two parts to give us a chance to stretch our legs), and then it was time for the exams. All of us were stressing over the practical portion of the exam, though my compatriots were stressing more than I was. I wish I had taken things a bit more seriously.

The Key Westers were among a small portion to take the practical test before the written exam, which I thought was great, due to everyone's stress about that. Our task was simple: make three classic cocktails, chosen by the presenter or staff member who would be judging us, in eight minutes. My judge was one of the more amusing presenters, and he told me that as long as I started the third cocktail by the end of the eight minutes, I'd be able to finish it. I wasn't worried about the time, though perhaps I should have been....many of these were cocktails I had never made, and I was not at my own bar, where I could quickly reach for whatever I needed blindly, knowing, after five years, where just about everything is. However, since they were only judging us on our knowledge of how to make the cocktail, the judges were very helpful in helping us locate something, as long as we identified what we needed. "Um, where's the gin?" "Right here." They never told us if we were grabbing the RIGHT ingredients, but they helped us along as best they could without giving away any information. The three cocktails I had to make were an Aviation Cocktail (which I had never made, nor heard of before this course), a Negroni (which I had never made before this course) and a Mojito (which I have made so many of that I used to boast I could make one blindfolded...and one day proved it!). So I did get one softball, although we had to make the cocktails, even the familiar ones, in the Classic way, not necessarily the way we make them at our own bars. Still, the Mojito was a welcome old friend to have in my corner.

As it turned out, I was right about the time being fine....just a moment after I set the third drink down for my judge to taste, I heard "Time!" Sweet! Later on, the only mistake I could think of that I had definitely made was shaking the Negroni, rather than stirring it. Whoops! I really wish I had studied the Classic Cocktails more, though.

After we finished the practical, we joined our fellow bartenders in the lecture room to take the written exam, and both Popcorn and I basically flew through it, though both of us found it far tougher than we had anticipated. Especially the blind tasting....which accounted for 15 of the 100 questions. It was really tough, actually, though the few rum questions I saw were welcome relief, as I knew the answers to those before I had ever even heard of this course. Still, I wish I had studied more than I did. Studying, or lack thereof, was always my biggest weakness as a student, both in high school and college.

After we finished, most of us retired to the hotel bar, some to celebrate, some to wash the pain away. Popcorn was convinced he had gone down in flames. So too was my coworker, and her boyfriend. I wasn't sure how I had done, though I thought I had passed....but I was worried. And at the bar the seminar staff informed us that we would not get the results of our tests for about TWO WEEKS! Man, that sucked....we all wanted to know how we had done!

The rest of the stay in Miami was pleasant enough, both the day before the seminar (Diamondbacks-Marlins baseball game with some friends and their kids; D-backs won!), and afterwards, which as mentioned, found us drinking at the hotel bar and then other bars in downtown Miami, though Popcorn got hammered early and was done by 9. Myself, I went to more bars, including one that had hosted a pre-seminar party the night before (Popcorn and I had not attended), which had Classic Cocktailian drinks, including drinks made with egg whites or whole eggs! Having read about such things in drinks, I was shocked at how much I enjoyed them, not just watching them be made, but actually the taste of them. (I even tried the Aviation, though my loathing of gin still made itself quite known.) And the awesome bartender there even made me one of his own creations, with muddle fresh jalapeno, tequila, and other goodies, making for an amazingly fresh yet spicy cocktail. I loved it! And at that bar, I met up with a guy I had met at the seminar, and his girlfriend, and had a lovely time with the two of them, drinking, talking, and just generally having fun. They both live in Miami, and are coming to Key West for some kind of special event here in a couple weekends. Naturally, just my luck, it's a gin event. Yay...not. But I look forward to hanging out with them! But, honestly, with all the fun I had, I really wish I had prepared more for this course.

I got the results today. I passed! As did Popcorn, my coworker, her boyfriend, and the guy from Miami. So now I can put on my resume that I am not merely a bartender, but an officially certified Mixologist. Do I wish I had prepared more? Hell yes. Absolutely. I should have taken this far more seriously, considering how much my employer had invested in me to do so. But that being said, I would not trade this experience for anything, and look forward to future challenges and learning experiences as a Mixologist. This course has opened up my eyes to so many possibilities for cocktails and drink ingredients.

fireheart
05-10-2012, 02:37 PM
what the hell is in a "Negroni?" :confused:

Dilorenzo
05-10-2012, 03:48 PM
what the hell is in a "Negroni?" :confused:

Apparently, this (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negroni).

It does not seems like something I would want to try...

But anyway, congrats Jester! You now need to make up business cards with "Professional Mixologist, Magician." Maybe add "Curser," too. Cause everything's better with cursing.

Jester
05-11-2012, 04:47 AM
what the hell is in a "Negroni?" :confused:

The way I was taught by the mixology course, a Negroni is a drink made up of 1 ounce gin, 1 ounce sweet vermouth, and 1 ounce Campari, stirred over ice (not shaken as I did at the practical), and strained into a chilled cocktail glass. While I have no problem with Campari or sweet vermouth, I wonder if they would hide the taste of gin enough for me to stomach this cocktail. Because, while I HAVE made one, I have never actually TASTED one. (Though of course I WOULD try it, as I am willing to try pretty much anything, even if I am pretty sure I won't like it...just like what happened with the Aviataion Cocktail I tried in Miami.)

Quasi-related....as I was finishing my shift today, a customer tried to order a Negroni from my coworker, the mid-shift bartender. Who asked me, "What is Negroni gin?" To which I explained to him what a Negroni was, though at the time I was blanking on the third ingredient (the Campari), though the customer tried to incorrectly explain that the third ingredient was bitters. While Campari is an apertif and may be classified as bitters, when people typically ask for bitters, they are asking for Angostura bitters or the like, which you usually just get a few dashes of from a small bottle. A full ounce of Angostura bitters would be overpowering, to say the least. And Angostura does not taste at all like Campari.

The difference would have made no difference to the customer, though, as he left in a huff when my coworker would not include the Negroni as part of the two for one happy hour deal...which it clearly wasn't, not being a single liquor well drink in any sense of the term. But of course, it's our fault that we are not willing to violate policy, break the rules, and risk termination of employment simply to satisfy the whims of idiot customers. :rolleyes:

Cause everything's better with cursing.

I thought everything was better with bacon? Or was it beer? :headscratch:

Dilorenzo
05-11-2012, 12:54 PM
Beer, Bacon and Cursing.

Oh my god. This should totally be a thing. A lifestyle webpage for things people actually want.

dalesys
05-11-2012, 10:01 PM
Beer, Bacon and Cursing Blasphemy.
Being alliterate is better than ill...:p

AccountingDrone
05-12-2012, 12:13 AM
Grats!

Next time down you will have to make me a blindfolded mojito :lol:

Jester
05-12-2012, 05:56 AM
Next time down you will have to make me a blindfolded mojito :lol:

Um, no. As I've said many times when describing that stunt, while it proved that I could do it (and do it well), that was the first AND THE LAST time I ever do it. It was amusing, it was hilarious, it was impressive....and it was a one time deal.

AccountingDrone
05-12-2012, 12:04 PM
Um, no. As I've said many times when describing that stunt, while it proved that I could do it (and do it well), that was the first AND THE LAST time I ever do it. It was amusing, it was hilarious, it was impressive....and it was a one time deal.

OK, then how about a mojito with splenda :devil:

[just a regular one will be fine, I happen to like them. Well, also the white wine sangria made in the recently closed Brassas in Hartford.]

Jester
05-13-2012, 11:09 PM
I have made several mojitos with Splenda. While I HATE doing it due to my personal views, on a professional level, I want my guests to be happy, and if that involves making a mojito with Splenda, then that's just what I'll do, damn it!

That....being....said.....when a woman last week asked me to add some coke to her wonderful rum cocktail, I handed her a separate cup of coke, telling her she could do it if she wanted, but I was just unable to do it without crying.

Her friends, and even her, laughed. Of course, I wasn't joking, but that's besides the point. (And no, that was not the first time I've done something like that, if you're wondering.)