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-   -   Linux and migrating from HDD to SSD... (http://www.customerssuck.com/board/showthread.php?t=121314)

mjr 02-20-2019 01:09 PM

Quote:

Quoth csquared (Post 1377361)
I wouldn't bother with a 1TB SSD. That will get expensive.

Terabyte SSDs are getting relatively cheap. HuevoNuevo has 1TB SSDs starting at $102. If you want them sold through but not by HuevoNuevo, they start at $63.

Of course, I don't know how good they are...

csquared 02-21-2019 01:20 AM

Wow. They have come down in price. I paid that for my 126GB SSD a few years ago. I checked NewEgg, and saw the high end brands at under $150 for a 1TB SSD.

I withdraw my early statements.

I would recommend that you mirror the data to another SSD or make backups every night. SSDs are not as forgiving as HDDs when they fail.

mjr 02-21-2019 11:23 AM

Quote:

Quoth csquared (Post 1377419)
I would recommend that you mirror the data to another SSD or make backups every night. SSDs are not as forgiving as HDDs when they fail.

Your last sentence here makes me think I should stick with the HDD instead of moving to a SSD -- at least for now.

Buzzard 02-21-2019 05:32 PM

SSDs are usually pretty stable. They DO eventually ...wear out. The individual memory locations can handle unlimited READs, but only so many WRITEs. Memory locations typically only fail during a write operation, which gets noticed by the drive. As each portion starts failing, the drive will remap to spares as available, then start shrinking in size reported to the system. When a drive starts shrinking, it's time to get the replacement.
With traditional HDDs, everything is on a spinning magnetic-coated platter. Any physical defect/damage can start creeping out from that point. Information can be lost from any point, regardless of being used or not.

Now as to keeping the SSD healthy, as above, they are great for FAST operations, and can read unlimited times. Most normal operation is just fine. What WILL eat a SSD early is write-heavy operations. Putting virtual memory (swap file, for some of us older hands) on a SSD isn't such a good thing, and defragging an SSD is not needed, period.
Traditional HDDs don't really wear out on read/write operations, so putting the virtual memory THERE would be the good thing.

Nightly backups... ??? Is this for a major business with critical daily transactions running through it?

EricKei 02-22-2019 02:57 AM

Quote:

Quoth lordlundar (Post 1377359)
For the first question, I'm not sure. I have not dealt with mirroring on Linux myself though reading through the procedure is the same.

Mkay. Note that I'm talking about a direct "ghost" from one drive to the other -- NOT setting up partitions, OS, etc ahead of time, but a literal, old-fashioned bit-for-bit clone of the drive directly from OldDrive:> to NewDrive:> ... It seems this is not being done here, so *whew* ^_^

Quote:

Quoth csquared (Post 1377419)
Wow. They have come down in price. I paid that for my 126GB SSD a few years ago.

Same here. Good to hear they're getting down to reasonable prices.

TheSHAD0W 02-22-2019 11:59 AM

Did you get it transferred over?

The way you should do it is download the bootable version of Gparted. First, resize the partitions on your HD down so they'll fit on the SSD. (May not be applicable if you get a big SSD. You may need to move data off the drive too.) Then you can copy the partitions over to the SSD, and make the boot partition bootable.

Naaman 02-23-2019 06:11 PM

Quote:

Quoth Buzzard (Post 1377445)
SSDs are usually pretty stable. They DO eventually ...wear out. The individual memory locations can handle unlimited READs, but only so many WRITEs. Memory locations typically only fail during a write operation, which gets noticed by the drive. As each portion starts failing, the drive will remap to spares as available, then start shrinking in size reported to the system. When a drive starts shrinking, it's time to get the replacement.
With traditional HDDs, everything is on a spinning magnetic-coated platter. Any physical defect/damage can start creeping out from that point. Information can be lost from any point, regardless of being used or not.

Now as to keeping the SSD healthy, as above, they are great for FAST operations, and can read unlimited times. Most normal operation is just fine. What WILL eat a SSD early is write-heavy operations. Putting virtual memory (swap file, for some of us older hands) on a SSD isn't such a good thing, and defragging an SSD is not needed, period.
Traditional HDDs don't really wear out on read/write operations, so putting the virtual memory THERE would be the good thing.

Nightly backups... ??? Is this for a major business with critical daily transactions running through it?

When I get asked;

SSD (or NVMe if you want insanly fast) is for your OS and any software that you use often and want to ensure it runs fast as well. Get one that's larger than you need because a) Crap expands b) You have more room for the write levelling to use, prolonging the life of the 'disc'
It's worth thinking about a fresdh OS install and use you HDD as a second drive (that will still have all your data on it)
HDD is for everything else, Window can be set up to point all Library folders to this one. Obviously if you're using Linux you should be fine remembering to install and save stuff to here.
Backup your critical files to the cloud, there's tons of free options that you can use
You can also pick up large external HDDs cheap (or HDD & a caddy) for on-site backups.

As I'm the default tech support for my family I dropped 30 on a 'toaster' disk cloner as it's nice & easy. Drop both disk in and press button then walk away, just need to fiddle with the partitions once it's done.

SteeleDragon78 02-27-2019 03:39 AM

Quote:

Quoth Naaman (Post 1377515)
As I'm the default tech support for my family I dropped 30 on a 'toaster' disk cloner as it's nice & easy. Drop both disk in and press button then walk away, just need to fiddle with the partitions once it's done.

i recently used one of the toaster style disc cloners and had issues going from HDD to SSD, after the clone windows believed that the new SSD was actually the HDD, as did my defrag program. i dont beileve there would be a problem doing a HDD to HDD clone or a SSD to SSD clone. just my :2cents:

Naaman 02-28-2019 05:02 PM

Quote:

Quoth SteeleDragon78 (Post 1377622)
i recently used one of the toaster style disc cloners and had issues going from HDD to SSD, after the clone windows believed that the new SSD was actually the HDD, as did my defrag program. i dont beileve there would be a problem doing a HDD to HDD clone or a SSD to SSD clone. just my :2cents:

Yeah, the amusingly translated documentation was pretty clear that the source (original) disk has to be smaller than the clone (new), although it's very clear which slot is which and that it only works one way. It did come with some software so you could manage it all on Windows but it's not very good, I can only speak for the one I have though (and bit of a derail for a one-off upgrade)

My go-to site for utilities I'm going to use once a blue moon is EaseUS, you're able to do most things with the free versions, they ahve an nice GUI and it doesn't nag you to upgrade

lordlundar 02-28-2019 05:32 PM

If the manufacturer of both the HDD and the SSD are the same, you might to check their website for a drive management app. Western Digital for example has a free, albeit reduced functionality of Arconis TrueImage on their website. I had just a couple days ago used it to clone my HDD to a higher capacity one with no issues.


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