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Help with how to handle a resignation.
  #1  
Old 06-23-2019, 12:24 AM
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mjr mjr is offline
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Default Help with how to handle a resignation.

Ok, here's the situation:

Back in March, I was let go from a job. In my job search, there came a position I was extremely interested in, and they were extremely interested in me.

Unfortunately, that position came down to a "timing issue" and the guy doing the hiring told me that they would call me when the position opened back up, but he didn't know when that would be, if at all. He said it could be two weeks, or six months, or two years. He just didn't know.

So I kept searching for a job. I started a new one about a month ago.

Now this other position (the above one that I am extremely interested in) has opened back up. And they offered it to me. I verbally accepted, but haven't gotten a formal offer or "welcome aboard" email, so I haven't submitted my official resignation yet. It would also be a $10,000 jump over my current salary.

The problems are twofold:

1. I feel kind of bad only being there a month. But the tech stack that they're using is VERY old.

2. Both of my bosses (or, probably more correctly, my boss and his boss, I'm not quite sure of the hierarchy) are out of town for two weeks this coming week. One is actually based in the out-of-town city, the other is in the major city where I work.

So if I get my "welcome aboard" email on, say, Monday, how should I handle turning in my resignation? I was thinking about a simple email, but I'm having trouble with coming up with some good wording, too. But neither of my bosses are in the office, and I don't want to put the other job "on hold" (i.e. make them wait) until the boss that's out of town (not the one based in the out-of-town city) gets back.

Advice? Thoughts?
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  #2  
Old 06-23-2019, 01:39 AM
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csquared csquared is offline
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Let's hope you get the official "Welcome aboard" and congrats!

Couple of questions:
Is local boss on vacation or working.
If working, how reachable is he?
Who is in charge while he is out?
Do you have an HR department?
Are you at HQ or a remote office?
If remote, who is the top dog in the office?
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  #3  
Old 06-23-2019, 02:12 AM
TheSHAD0W TheSHAD0W is offline
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The resignation letter itself should be simple and straightforward, not giving excuses, etc. You might want to speak with other people personally, or leave unofficial notes. I still wouldn't give excuses, just say that you enjoyed working there and were sorry you had to leave so abruptly.

  #4  
Old 06-23-2019, 10:20 AM
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Quote:
Quoth csquared View Post
Let's hope you get the official "Welcome aboard" and congrats!

Couple of questions:
Is local boss on vacation or working.
If working, how reachable is he?
Who is in charge while he is out?
Do you have an HR department?
Are you at HQ or a remote office?
If remote, who is the top dog in the office?
Good questions. Let me answer.

1. local boss is working.
2. Unknown. He has email, I don't know his cell #, and I don't know what his calendar looks like.
3. Unknown. I would assume the guy who is based in out-of-town city.
4. Yes.
5. I'm at their office in Local Big City.

Quote:
Quoth TheSHAD0W View Post
The resignation letter itself should be simple and straightforward, not giving excuses, etc. You might want to speak with other people personally, or leave unofficial notes. I still wouldn't give excuses, just say that you enjoyed working there and were sorry you had to leave so abruptly.
This is solid, too. Although I was thinking of using one sentence that basically said, "I've been made an offer that I don't want to pass on." or something like that. Something like:

Late last week, I was made an offer that I don't want to pass on. Therefore, I am resigning my position as <position> effective at the end of the workday on <date>. I have enjoyed my brief time here, and wish you all success.
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Last edited by EricKei; 06-23-2019 at 11:42 PM. Reason: merged consecutive posts

  #5  
Old 06-23-2019, 12:15 PM
TheSHAD0W TheSHAD0W is offline
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Quote:
Quoth mjr View Post
This is solid, too. Although I was thinking of using one sentence that basically said, "I've been made an offer that I don't want to pass on."
I don't recommend it. This is something that might be passed to future employers, and might sabotage any remaining chances you might get to rejoin the firm in case this new job doesn't work out.

  #6  
Old 06-23-2019, 03:28 PM
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Shadow is right. Remember, anything you say can and will be used against you.

Your letter of resignation should read;

[Boss]

I here by tender me resignation as [position] with [Company] effective end of business on [future date].

MJR
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  #7  
Old 06-24-2019, 02:13 AM
Pixelated Pixelated is offline
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Some good advice here. Just to play devil's advocate, I remember working on a little (two editorial people) newspaper, and my editor was moving on to a slightly larger weekly (I later followed him, but that's neither here nor there for this story ).

He hired a new editor, a young guy not long out of school.

Either the day the young guy was to start, or very near it, he walked in, all suited up, and looking very nervous. He'd gotten a similar job offer from a small daily, and had been facing the same decision you are. He opted for the daily. He came in person to let the departing editor know. The departing editor was very understanding and wished him all the best.

It's hard to say whether such honesty will haunt you (I know this particular editor would NOT have passed it along as a "warning" or anything of the sort; he considered it the sensible decision). I would probably let them know why I was quitting so abruptly, but that doesn't mean it's the right thing to do.
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  #8  
Old 07-01-2019, 03:16 PM
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Well, one of the managers here has expressed "be honest" and "be a good person".

So that's a plus.

Anyway, I don't have to do this until next week, I believe. I had some paperwork for the new job I had to complete, and there's other things like that going on. They have a tentative start date for me of July 22nd.

So I'm probably going to go relatively straightforward.

Something like:

I am resigning my position of <position>, effective <Date>.
I am providing 2 weeks notice, so my last day will be <Date>
Thank you for the opportunity to work with ABC Industries, Inc.
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