PDA

View Full Version : Pick Up The Toy!


laundryhater
08-29-2008, 12:32 AM
My part-time job is working as a switchboard operator at a hospital.

The hospital has long hallways, most of them carpeted but there's a couple that are just tile.

I was walking in one of the long tiled hallways.

A mom pushing a stroller and her friend and friend's young son were walking toward me in the other hallway "lane".

The son was I'd say about 5 years old and scooting on the floor on his hands and knees pushing a toy car. Suddenly the boy pushes the toy as hard as he can sending it in my direction.

I saw the car coming my way and jumped out of the way to avoid tripping over it and gave the women a glare.

I'm 14 weeks pregnant and don't wish to trip and fall and hurt my baby.

It took all the restraint I had not to tell those women off!!

Who in their right mind lets their kid race cars down a hospital hallway where other people and possibly PATIENTS walk!!!

They said a weak "Sorry" but continued to let him race the car down the hall. Weren't too sorry or they would've picked up the toy!

I didn't acknowlege their weak apologies and continued to glare at them.

Seriously people!!! This is not your living room, go play with your toys somewhere else!

When I was little my mom taught me that you walk quietly in a hospital. If you must talk outside of the exam room, you whisper and you certainly don't run or play with toys in the hallway. Epic fail on that "mom's" part (I use the word "mom" loosely here because she wasn't acting like one).

Aethian
08-29-2008, 12:40 AM
And in six years your going to remember to have your child pick up the toy after who knows who is in the hospital?

Kudos to you if you can, but they might have had a bit more on their mind then a child who is being happy.

IEatCustomers4Breakfast
08-29-2008, 01:42 AM
And in six years your going to remember to have your child pick up the toy after who knows who is in the hospital?

Kudos to you if you can, but they might have had a bit more on their mind then a child who is being happy.

Good point, but people ARE still capable of having manners and instilling them in their children in the height of hospital turmoil.

Not parenting your children because grandpa is sick and mommy is sad could possibly teach them that it's okay to act like a little asshole if you can explain it away.

Or not... who's to say.

Also, having a little bit of manners could keep you from getting in trouble. What if laundryhater had fallen and something had happened to her baby? She'd have every right to sue that mom for not keeping a leash on her kid.

Peppergirl
08-29-2008, 01:44 AM
And in six years your going to remember to have your child pick up the toy after who knows who is in the hospital?

Kudos to you if you can, but they might have had a bit more on their mind then a child who is being happy.


:jawdrop: Are you saying this makes it ok? Because the mom may have been preoccupied?

I've been in hospital situations when my kids were that age, serious ones and was not always fortunate enough to always have a sitter. They would NEVER have been allowed to do that in a hospital, regardless of the situation. There are just too many things that can happen, as demostrated by the OP.

Granted, the kid was just being a kid but the parent or the adult should have had better control of the situation.

I personally don't blame the OP for not accepting the half-assed apology offered, especially when the child wasn't corrected or picked up.

The only place my kids were allowed a bit of freedom were in the designated, carpeted waiting areas for kids where they had toys.

Aethian
08-29-2008, 02:05 AM
I'm not saying it's okay but I am saying that the OP should have said something if it bothered her that much. Maybe a little "Could you not have him do that? I don't want to trip." Sure the Mom could have acted sucky but it could have also brought her out of whatever mindset she was in and realize the kid was acting outside of set boundaries.

I'm not saying she should have accepted the appology but if the parent was truly out of it they may not have known the full situation and only seeing her kid playing with a truck, not that the kid could have caused harm to another.

People aren't going to know what bothers another person unless that person brings it up.

Peppergirl
08-29-2008, 02:12 AM
I'm not saying it's okay but I am saying that the OP should have said something if it bothered her that much. Maybe a little "Could you not have him do that?

No disrespect, but the way you made it sound in your original post made it sound like you excused it, not that she should have spoken up. If I misunderstood, I apologize.

For what it's worht, I completely agree about saying something at that time. I certainly would have spoken up.

Aethian
08-29-2008, 02:16 AM
No disrespect, but the way you made it sound in your original post made it sound like you excused it, not that she should have spoken up. If I misunderstood, I apologize.

For what it's worth, I completely agree about saying something at that time. I certainly would have spoken up.


I didn't word it clearly enough, no harm done as misunderstanding on your end and lack of clarity on my own.

RetailWorkhorse
08-29-2008, 05:04 PM
I'm a horrible person.

Because I'd have kicked the toy out of the way and told that "Mom" to keep a closer rein on the kid and Kid's toys because if I found them out in the hall using it as a playpen again I'd have them ejected from the hospital.

But then I really rather hate kids currently (stop screaming in my store you brat). Dammit, who keeps taking my cheerios?? I didn't eat them all already......did I?

tollbaby
08-29-2008, 06:22 PM
I don't see a whole lot of suck here. I see a distracted parent and a passive aggressive OP. Yeah, maybe the kid shouldn't have been playing with his car in the hallways, but mom was probably just grateful he was behaving. They did at least apologize, and it doesn't sound like this was in the bustle of the ER or Intensive Care units.

Quite frankly, I think the OP was ruder than the parents by simply glaring at strangers instead of speaking up for herself, and from the tone of the post, I think her anger was way out of proportion to the situation. OKay, so you're 14 months pregnant. You saw the car coming from a good ways and there was no danger of tripping over it. It was a kid being a kid. Going down the "What if this had happened" road isn't going to change anything, and not speaking up ensures that the parents see nothing wrong with what happened.

CorDarei
08-29-2008, 09:56 PM
... OKay, so you're 14 months pregnant.....

i think you meant weeks... ;) and looking at a quick google image search, being 3.5 months pregnant doesn't necessarliy mean you don't have the mobility to get out of the way of something quickly (don't most ppl just start showing @ 3 months?)

I take this post as more of a hormonal thing than true anger..

how big was the car btw?

laundryhater
09-02-2008, 11:48 PM
The reason I didn't say what was on my mind at the time was because I didn't want to get fired*. If that's passive agressive so be it...I still have my job.

*People's definition of the word "rude" has been skewed so much over the years that it doesn't even come close to the true meaning . Often times when I am stating the obvious to customers they tell me I'm being "rude" and threaten to report me. I wish they'd get a frickin dictionary already!!

I may have overreacted a bit but my protective mom instints just took over. Besides I have 2 close friends who recently miscarried and so I'm trying to be extra careful not to put baby at risk.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
09-04-2008, 06:38 PM
I'm dismayed there are people here who think the OP somehow did wrong and are making excuses for the parent.

A hospital hallway is not an appropriate place to play with a car like that, IMO. Not with nurses and patients and visitors being out and about.

If the kid wants to play with his toy, he can wait until he's in those lounge-like areas.

Aethian
09-04-2008, 06:43 PM
I beleive she did wrong by not saying something like, "Mam could you have your son pick up the car?" Or "This really isn't a good place for him to be playing with that, someone might trip."

In turn to someone at least trying to say 'Sorry' she gave them the old cold shoulder and turned up her nose. She acted IMO very badly and if she was worried about her job could have at least said it nicely. What if someone down the hallway didn't see the car because their nose was in a chart and they got hurt. It could have come back to her and she could have lost her job anyways because of not stopping a dangerous situation before it become one more then what it was.

Sure she is worried about her three month old fetus (I say fetus because I don't beleive we were given a sex) but as a impending new Mother she could have done better. THAT is what I'm irked about.

Irving Patrick Freleigh
09-04-2008, 06:56 PM
She could have handled it worse too. Her "protective mother" instinct could've caused her to tear the mother a new one verbally.

Plus, as she mentioned, some people equate being told "no" or asked to do something as "rude" and will make a federal case about it. Besides, it shouldn't be her job to make sure somebody else's kid picks his toy up.

Regardless, she handled the situation in her own way and I don't particularly see a problem with it. At least not one worthy of calling her rude or hormonal.

protege
09-04-2008, 08:52 PM
The only place my kids were allowed a bit of freedom were in the designated, carpeted waiting areas for kids where they had toys.

When I was that age, I was in the hospital for some minor surgery. One of the play rooms, was literally in the hallway. If I remember correctly, the floor we were on was being remodeled, but not all of it was finished. There wasn't any construction equipment around, but the elevators in that little "lobby" weren't working (they were there, but didn't go anywhere). Floor was carpeted, TV's hanging from the ceiling, etc. but we were allowed to play there.

Dips
09-08-2008, 06:43 PM
Am I the only one who is thinking that letting one's child play with a toy on the floor of a busy hospital corridor is a bad thing for the child's health?

You've got all kinds of people walking all over that floor and you don't know where their feet have been.

Emrld
09-08-2008, 07:07 PM
note I did see the parts by the poster that she was "at work" at the time of incident so she has an extra set of don't piss others off to deal with . . .and current mobility may have prevented what I would do.

If I see a kid doing something like pushing a car down a hall keeping the hand on the car and staying with adults they are with . . .then I am ok with it.
Sounds like the kid let go of the car and had it zoom toward our poster. If that were me and I was able to bend that day . . .I would have picked up the car and handed it to the parent. If it was a day I couldn't bend I would have spoken to the parent. something along the lines of "I have a hard enough time being mobile . . .I know I don't need moving objects in the hall way and I am sure in a hospital I am not the only one with mobility issues"

laundryhater
09-08-2008, 11:29 PM
There are signs everywhere that say "Keep Your Head Up" with a picture of someone reading a chart while walking with an X over it and a picture of someone carrying the chart while walking upright and looking straight ahead and watching where they're going.

So no, I would not have lost my job if someone else was reading a chart not looking where they were going and tripped over the car. More likely the person reading the chart while walking would lose their job for not following hospital policy. That's a huge no, no that not only puts them at risk but others as well. This policy is also covered in our twice a year safety test everyone must pass.

Lace Neil Singer
09-09-2008, 08:50 PM
I would have done like Retailworkhorse and kicked the car, but then I'm a total bitch and I don't like kids.

For the record, I don't buy the bleeding heart "Oh, the mother was obviously worried about someone so had better things to do!" and "The kid was just being a kid!" Would that still apply had the child thrown his car at the OP or torn someone's chart off the end of their bed or something mega distructive? I'm pretty sick of people trying to excuse things by saying that a kid is being a kid. There's a time and place for a kid to be a kid and it's not in a hospital corridor. The mother should have corrected her child and taken the toy from him if he couldn't carry it without sending it rolling towards other people.

Sheldonrs
09-09-2008, 10:30 PM
I would have done like Retailworkhorse and kicked the car, but then I'm a total bitch and I don't like kids.

For the record, I don't buy the bleeding heart "Oh, the mother was obviously worried about someone so had better things to do!" and "The kid was just being a kid!" Would that still apply had the child thrown his car at the OP or torn someone's chart off the end of their bed or something mega distructive? I'm pretty sick of people trying to excuse things by saying that a kid is being a kid. There's a time and place for a kid to be a kid and it's not in a hospital corridor. The mother should have corrected her child and taken the toy from him if he couldn't carry it without sending it rolling towards other people.

I agree with this. I know parents get distracted and all that but, much like freedom, the price of parenthood is eternal vigilance. In my opinion, when you decide to have a kid, you give up the right to be too tired, too distracted or too lazy to be able to control your kid.

auntiem
09-09-2008, 11:39 PM
Am I the only one who is thinking that letting one's child play with a toy on the floor of a busy hospital corridor is a bad thing for the child's health?

You've got all kinds of people walking all over that floor and you don't know where their feet have been.

That is exactly what I was thinking - I got a smack for crawling around on the floor of an airport or grocery - a crawl on the floor of a hospital probably would have gotten me autoclaved!